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Research Triangle Charter Academy

Charter | K-8 | 636 students

 

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Living in Durham

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $169,300. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $820.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
Based on 4 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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42 reviews of this school


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Posted November 4, 2013

I don't want to knock this school, because academically, your child will thrive IF you work with them at home too. I had to confront the teacher about keeping me in the loop early on in the school year regarding my son's in class performance on assignments. If your child tends to be the "typical" very active boy this is not the school for your child. My son attended this school for kindergarten and the 1st 2 months of 1st grade. The school lacks teachers with experience dealing with very active students. When asked if my child could be transferred into a teacher with more years of experience my request was denied TWICE. If your child isn't one of those kids that stays focused ALL day, the teachers nick pick at EVERYTHING they do from talking to yelling answers out without raising their hand. If your child needs a program for being academically gifted, this school doesn't have it. I have switched to Durham Public Schools and I m so glad I did. DPS understand that kids will be kids and not discipline for everything they do. Three days out of school suspension of a 5 year old in one month is just RIDICULOUS!! The explanation the principal gave was "We had to do something!" No Thanks!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2013

This is our second year at rtca...I now have a kindergarten and 2nd grade student. I'm very pleased overall. The teachers are easy to communicate with, the administration is great and my kids are happy to go. The car pool line is crazy but will settle down as the year progresses. I love the way the school seeks out ways to Schiavo encourage students to be leaders and behave through positive incentives. The whole class may receive a punishment (usually walking laps) but they don't make the kids change their color for a class misbehavior...that is just an indicator of individual behavior. The homework loss is very appropriate..one page of math and one of penmanship/spelling and then reading. We are very happy overall with this school. My son is very advanced in reading and they are able to work with him at his level to constantly improve...They are not letting him slide because he is ahead.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 15, 2013

It's sad that the reviews for this school are being dragged down by reviews from years ago. I love this school and Dr. Carson will always be supported by my husband and I. The private school we wanted her to get into since she turned 2 years old sent us away last year. This year they would have accepted her ... but we declined. She's thriving, why move her? It's not perfect, but the teachers and staff are wonderful. They are honest and helpful. They tell you what is really going on with your child so that they can help find solutions and help them. What parent wants to be left in the dark about their child's true progress? Dr. Carson is doing a fantastic job.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 2, 2013

My daugther is in 1th grade and the teacher are amazing..always attenden my request the teacher are very friendly......everybody know everybody and I like that!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 27, 2012

I love the school. My kids were there for 3 years and it was an awesome experience. I left this school year and I missed the school so bad. The teachers at RTCA really care for each child and they want each one of them to succed. I volunteered as much as I could and the teacher were always nice.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 26, 2012

My child is in Kindergarten this school year. I am very impressed with his teacher. I am a very involved in my child's school life and I expect a lot of him. His teacher understands this and we email almost daily. My son lets me know daily what "my teacher said to do it this way". The principal is new, but seems to be making changes for the better. I highly recommend this school to parents seeking positive reinforcement and a sense of comfort within the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 28, 2012

This is by far the best school that my children have attended. We went to three schools in three years. Regular public schools have nothing on RTCA. All of the teachers are caring and dedicated. I do not see any difference in treatment between kids. I try to volunteer regularly and do so unexpectedly, and it is always a pleasant experience. Furthermore, their orchestra, band, and art programs are some of the best! My children will continue to attend until their time to move on to high school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 22, 2012

My daughter is in kindergarten at RTCA. So far, I am pleased with the school. She is learning well and getting plenty of homework, I can see her maturity since the beginning of the year. She went from not really reading to writing sentences and she works very well on her own. She gets along with the other students and loves her teacher. New Principal this year and seems to be still feeling his way through but has made a couple of changes for the better. I have not yet gotten involved with the Parent Association but would like to next year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 26, 2010

My son attended RTCA and was very unhappy. He was constantly having to defend himself against bullies. When I transfered him to Merrick Moore he was not only learning more but he had a great relationship with the teachers and staff there. Getting him out of RTCA was the best decision I could have ever made.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 3, 2010

this pst is right on target,im not sure how this schol is still open.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 29, 2010

I have to admit RTCA was a HUGE disappointment to say the least. I'm completely grieved with the overly crowded classroom size and the abundance of homework, (it seems the teachers are not teaching in the classrooms) the students bring home on a weekly basis. I have witnessed a lack of cultual compentency as well as great lack of classroom management skills. It's so easy for a child who is not an initiator, or leader to get lost and fall way behind in the classroom. Yes the kids don't talk in the hallway and are quiet during mornning meeting but the classrooms are chaotic to say the least and the lack of disciplining the students who bully are just heart wrenching. Some of the staff treat every child as though they are a behavioral problem and not with the respect that EACH child (regardless of parental involvment) deserves.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 2, 2009

hi im desmond, attended RTCA from the 4-8 grade and it was a good and bad experience. the teachers got on my nerves almost everyday and everything they said went in 1 ear and out the other, but now i regret not listening. the teachers are just trying to get you ready for high school
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 30, 2009

This is without question the worst school I have ever had the misfortune of being involved with. It is a total disaster. Never send your child here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 19, 2009

I submitted a review on this school yesterday and for some reason only the first 2 lines are showing. So I'm trying again... My daughter attended 8th grade at this school and our family loved everything about the school. It's a wonderful school. She has a handicap and I found the teacher very supportive. I visited the school often and found the staff was always polite and helpful. I'm not sure why one parent thinks the hallways are chaos but that was not my perception. I had my daughter in a private school before RTC and I found the experience between the 2 was about the same. Yes, there are more children in the classroom than a private school has but it's still much better than the regular public schools. And my daughter did stay in the upper level of her class.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 2, 2009

I went to this school for 3 years (middle school) and it was the worst school experience I've ever had. I feel like I learned nothing from this school and the misbehaved students were the main focus of all the teachers, rather than wanting to actually teach us. I feel like most of the good teachers left in a huge wave leaving the students to fend for themselves.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 15, 2009

I could say so much, but for right now I'll just say, if you love your child/children, please do not send them to this school. This is our first year here and it is horrible. I'm so sorry that I ever went this way.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 21, 2008

Hi, This is my first year dealing with RTCA. At the beginning of the shcool year I had problems with my childs teacher. It took too long for administration to address the problem with the teacher. Finally, they addressed the problem and the teacher now is doing great. I do believe that the school has a long way to go. For one, they need to address the cafe issue. There needs to be a breakfast and lunch menu provided for the kids in an actual lunch room. There seems to be no organization within the halls. Students are all over the place. I do agree that the white shirts are an issue. They could change to a more suitable and durable color. I am going to wait this year out and see how my son progress being here at RTCA, but there are several things I am concerned about.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 19, 2008

I have two children that attended private school before attending RTCA. I was very pleased with the transitioning process. The teachers and administrative staff were consistent in their respective areas. Both of my children excelled while attending RTCA. As for the behaviors, discilpline begins first in the home. Parents are childrens first teachers. Children only mimick what they learn at home. Thus far, I have been very satisfied with RTCA.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 8, 2008

I have a son a RTCA in the 7th grade. The kids are out of control. (but they are everywhere) I feel sorry for the teachers. The tolerance for misbehaved children is LOW. If their was a no tolerance rule the kids would get the message and so would the parents. We need that at RTCA. Send their butts home so others can learn. CONSISTANT no tolerance will work. Homework is not want I expected it to be. There is not enough of it. Vocab. never. Math homework is never what they went over in class they need reinforcing assignments. Uniforms GREAT but why white shirts they are so hard to keep clean and so many of the kids have stains or just plain dingy that its embarassing. Behavor needs to be a subject that requires an A to advance to your next grade level. Is RTCA better than other, NO.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 29, 2008

RTCA is a great school with concerned teachers and staff. Compared to public school, it has been great for our family to be able to be in one school together with a group of teachers and administrators who we feel are very concern for the students.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

71 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
24%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
62%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

71 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
55%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
74%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
25%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
55%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
11%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
65%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

62 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-5%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
50%

2010

 
 
56%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
62%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
56%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
61%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
53%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
55%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students24%
Female26%
Male21%
Black21%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged16%
Not economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students26%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English24%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant24%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students30%
Female37%
Male21%
Black25%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged23%
Not economically disadvantaged39%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students32%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English32%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant30%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students27%
Female18%
Male39%
Black25%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged21%
Not economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students31%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English30%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant27%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students25%
Female21%
Male31%
Black25%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged21%
Not economically disadvantaged32%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students31%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English26%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant25%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students11%
Female17%
Male-5%
Black8%
Asiann/a
Hispanic9%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged-5%
Not economically disadvantaged23%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students13%
Limited English proficiency18%
Proficient in English10%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant11%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students21%
Female26%
Male14%
Black19%
Asiann/a
Hispanic18%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged12%
Not economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students21%
Limited English proficiency27%
Proficient in English19%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant21%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students-5%
Female9%
Male-5%
Black-5%
Asiann/a
Hispanic-5%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged-5%
Not economically disadvantaged10%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students6%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English6%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-5%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students33%
Female40%
Male26%
Black32%
Asiann/a
Hispanic42%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged33%
Not economically disadvantaged32%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students39%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English31%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant33%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students37%
Female42%
Male31%
Black37%
Asiann/a
Hispanic25%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged26%
Not economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students44%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English39%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant37%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students21%
Female23%
Male19%
Black15%
Asiann/a
Hispanic24%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged19%
Not economically disadvantaged23%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students23%
Limited English proficiency23%
Proficient in English20%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant21%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students32%
Female31%
Male32%
Black28%
Asiann/a
Hispanic29%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged26%
Not economically disadvantaged40%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students35%
Limited English proficiency31%
Proficient in English32%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant32%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students30%
Female29%
Male31%
Black28%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged37%
Not economically disadvantaged22%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students31%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English30%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant30%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students40%
Female29%
Male48%
Black39%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged37%
Not economically disadvantaged44%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students42%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English40%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant40%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students40%
Female17%
Male59%
Black39%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged37%
Not economically disadvantaged44%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students42%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English42%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant40%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 73% 26%
Hispanic 16% 14%
White 6% 52%
Two or more races 4% 4%
American Indian 1% 1%
Asian 1% 3%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 49%N/A50%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Devon Carson
Fax number
  • (919) 957-9698

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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2418 Ellis Road
Durham, NC 27703
Website: Click here
Phone: (919) 957-7108

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