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Central Park School For Children

Charter | K-5 | 297 students

 
 

Living in Durham

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $125,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $630.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 5 ratings
2012:
Based on 7 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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30 reviews of this school


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Posted December 21, 2013

Admin. more concerned with image than with effectiveness teaching. High EOG test scores more a reflection of the high socio-eco. status of students than of quality of education received here. No surprise that children with (non-school) enrichment opportunities score well on tests. This school is not producing high performing children so much as its collecting them out of a poorer Durham student population. School policies, such as not providing transportation, ensure school remains a safe haven for parents whose support for diversity is bumper-sticker thin. EC program- different director almost every year, high staff turnover, low training, little accountability. Durham parents of special needs kids choose the school for same reasons as non EC parents, they've prioritized social environment over education. Parents stridently trumpeting this school show how little understanding they have about how the environment they've created shuts out those different in terms of race, status, social ability or learning style. Read parent forum for open commentary by those who pulled their "non-conforming" kids out of the school. Great facade hides poor teaching, cliquishness, hypocrisy.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 1, 2013

My son received less than average education after kindergarten. Admittedly, he wasn't particularly motivated to please his teachers; preferred play to work. He's bright, funny, inquisitive... just not academically motivated. Administrators & some teachers responded by making it very unpleasant for him. He spent much time sitting in hall and was constantly reprimanded - even for slight offenses. He dreaded going. This had a significant impact on his self-image; he was the 'bad kid'. Once labeled, he didn't stand a chance there. (He's now a good, solid middle-school student; engaged & notably well-behaved.) In retrospect, I think CPSC discourages continued enrollment of poor or average students who are not particularly motivated (an effective technique for improving overall test scores). I agree with others: the School doesn't value diversity - they want one type of student. Not a place for happy-go-lucky, strong-willed little boys. Tends toward exclusivity, a place to send your compliant, high achievers. Yes, it should just publicly embrace their MO and go private.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 28, 2013

This school is phenomenal. The EC department is one of the best i've seen and we feel very fortunate to take part in it. You can really tell an amazing school by how many smiles you see on the parents and kids faces at pick-up and drop-off time...this is the place.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 8, 2013

CPSC is such an awesome school. My son loves it there so much. The teachers and staff are excellent and guide the children in a peaceful way and help them see their potential. It's a project based/hands on learning environment so the children are learning to learn, not just memorizing stuff. We feel so lucky to there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 5, 2013

In response to this: " In subtle and not so subtle ways the director has created an atmosphere that is hostile to diverse families, especially low-income and EC children, and as a result there has been a huge decrease in diversity (literally less than 3% of free and reduced lunch children" Low income children typically don't attend the school b/c their is no bus transportation. And diversity isn't only skin deep. There are a ton of kids that have same-sex parents, single parents and other a-typical family models. That is diversity too. In regards to the statement about EC children, this school has a great EC program and thats why so many parents of EC children chose to go here.


Posted August 10, 2012

I have two children at this school. Staff and teachers are superior and care about the success of the children. Project based learning has fostered curiosity and exploration in learning -- my children love going to school. After school program is excellent. Take time to visit the school, talk to the teachers, and observe the classrooms. No school is perfect for every child, but this school is keeper!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 8, 2012

We have loved the project-based focus of the schools and most of the teaching staff are talented and caring, and there is a dedicated core of parents. But as the reviewer has said, with the change in leadership a few years ago, there is no longer a commitment tto serve as a public school. In subtle and not so subtle ways the director has created an atmosphere that is hostile to diverse families, especially low-income and EC children, and as a result there has been a huge decrease in diversity (literally less than 3% of free and reduced lunch children). I feel the focus is more on making the school a "model" school to show off in public (and therefore being only open to "model" students) rather than serving as a public school that is open to and is dedicated to educating all of Durham's children and supporting families.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 8, 2012

I knew it the day I stumbled into that school when my son was a newborn..."wow" is what I thought to myself. "This school looks awesome! I wonder if I could get my son in here?" I was delivering something from a previous job and that stop was made to CPSC. It was something about the atmosphere that I fell in love with. When I received the phone call 3 years ago saying that my son's name was drawn from the raffle I was more relieved and excited than I ever thought possible. Central Park has to this day lived up to my expectations. They are imperfect, as any school. But I cannot find one issue that makes me wish or even for a second contemplate transferring my son to another school. I love the atmosphere, the friendly smiling faces, the parent involvement, the kind teachers, but what makes it the best school is the comradery between the students, they are really a peaceful school. You will find this in no other school around. We are truly the best school. There is no other school that I have ever heard of that comes close to what this school wants to accomplish and does accomplish.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 8, 2012

Our daughter attended a Durham Magnet School for Kindergarten. It was fine. We had no real complaints. Academically, she did well. The teacher was nice, yet she never felt comfortable in her own skin. In fact, she was often quite anxious & unsure of how to interact with other kids, and that was something so far beyond what one teacher of 28 kindergartners could even begin to address. We transferred to CPSFC for first grade and have been so thrilled with how she has just blossomed into a confident kid. Our younger child is there now too, and we just love it! We are so impressed with how much the teachers truly care about the kids in their classes & throughout the school. The small class sizes are fantastic. There is a ton of parent involvement, which give children the opportunity to build relationships with other adults. My kids are also learning to be peaceful & creative problem solvers, and to be participants in a community where they are truly valued for who they are.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 8, 2012

This school looks great when you tour & the mission and philosophy on the website are what we were looking for in a school. Unfortunately, the current administration was not supportive our children and others we know. Bad decisions were made and our children suffered. The other thing we learned about charter schools is that there's not much of a means of grieving or expressing concerns when serious problems exist. There are some great teachers here and there are students and famlies that this school works for, but it is not for everyone and lacks diversity of thought that one might expect in a Durham school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 8, 2012

Just a comment about diversity at this school. The diveristy of the staff is better than at my local DPS school. (~1/6 of the classroom teachers at CPSC are of color, while at our local DPS school only 1/9 of the staff are). I'm sure this varies around the county, but that's the facts for our area. And as for student diversity, the current administration has actively been 'recruiting' to the local community in effort to increase diversity of the student population. But like all charter schools, they are beholden to take children via lottery. And since those appplying are overwhelmingly white, statistically speaking, that's what the school looks like. But this is not the fault of the administration, it's the fault of the charter school law. In fact, the charter school law also does not require transportation be provided, which is why charter schools are lacking in economic diversity. (This applies all around Durham, not just at this school.) So let's put our efforts into changing the charter school law and keep this great school as a model of what a school should be!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 8, 2012

Not what it used to be! I posted a positive rating for this school years ago. Unfortunately, my opinion of this school is not good the same. The school should drop for children, as chidlren do not seem to be the focus anymore.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 23, 2010

Wonderful setting. Great parent and community involvement.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 21, 2010

Central Park has a creative and nurturing environment. There's little emphasis on end of grade tests, but the kids generally seem to perform very well on them. I love that there's access to the outdoors, with walking field trips, gardening, and recess.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2010

Little to no homework, really tight parent involvement, comfortable indoor and outdoor spaces (not a typical painted-cement edifice), and involvement in numerous community activities make this an exciting place for parents and students.


Posted October 11, 2010

There is just a great feeling in the hallways! John and all the staff really care about seeing the students succeed and have the expertise to make great things happen.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 10, 2010

It is such a wonderful project based school. The children are treated respectfully and as part of the team. Everyone is on a 1st name basis there. The kids have lots of outdoor time and every class has its own garden. They are very involved with the community. I can't say enough good things about it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 10, 2010

Central Park is a creative place for kids, full of life and learning, and with lots of parent and community support.


Posted October 10, 2010

Creative, hands-on, project-based learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 10, 2010

Central Park is a dynamic, community-based, parent driven and project oriented school. I absolutely love it!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
78%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
89%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students67%
Female65%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilities30%
Non-disabled students78%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English69%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant67%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students76%
Female74%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilities50%
Non-disabled students83%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English78%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant76%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students50%
Female46%
Male56%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilities18%
Non-disabled students61%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English50%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students67%
Female69%
Male63%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilities46%
Non-disabled students74%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English67%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant67%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students44%
Female35%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White54%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilities20%
Non-disabled students58%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English46%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant44%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students59%
Female65%
Male54%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilities33%
Non-disabled students73%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English62%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant59%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students39%
Female29%
Male46%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White50%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disabilities33%
Non-disabled students42%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English41%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant39%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 70% 52%
Black 18% 26%
Hispanic 5% 14%
Two or more races 5% 4%
Asian 2% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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724 Foster Street
Durham, NC 27701
Website: Click here
Phone: (919) 682-1200

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