Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Pearsontown Elementary

Public | PK-5 | 822 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 7 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Sweep tile
No Purchase Necessary. Void where prohibited. Sweepstakes begins at 12:00:00 AM Pacific Time (PT) on April 1, 2014 and ends at 11:59:59 on April 30, 2014 (the “Promotion Period”). Open to legal residents of the U.S. and D.C., 13 years and older. Each school that receives a new, published review will get one (1) entry into the sweepstakes, up to ten (10) entries throughout the Promotion Period. See the Official Rules for details. Sponsor: GreatSchools, 1999 Harrison St., Suite 1100, Oakland, CA 94612.

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

27 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted January 10, 2014

My daughter has moved through the DPS system from Pearsontown to Rogers-Herr to Hillside New Tech, so I can speak with hindsight. This was a good school at the time. I hope is still is. We loved the year-round schedule, and she had great, experienced teachers. Overall it was a good experience, and I think she was challenged.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 17, 2013

I have been teaching at this school for over five years. I've stayed for a number of reasons. One, because the of the diversity of our school ( all aspects of diversity). Two, because of my fellow teachers! Parents complained about us acting as if it's a social arena instead of teaching, well, yes we also teach, push, challenge and inspire the students. You want a school where teachers socialize it means were having fun! I think some people who write reviews on this site should think first: what's it like to be a teacher? Have you spent days in the class volunteering and wearing our shoes? If you want to write a review about an institution write to our local government and ask why teachers haven't received a cost of living raise in 8 yrs, why there aren't enough books for students, why we don't have time to dig deeper into objectives, and why they don't praise us instead of defining us by a seven page evaluation of data! (Our principal does praise us!) I love Pearsontown, I love the staff, I love our new principal, Mr Teal, and the staff! You are amazing, and wonderful! I'd write more but just like education has become there are limits!! 1200 of them.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted October 16, 2013

There are a handful of quality teachers, and the rest are just there to get a paycheck. This school has lost all the qualities of a good educational institution. The teachers used to care about their students, but now they all just walk around talking to each other, and not actually teaching students anything. It's become a social arena for teachers, instead of an educational institution of higher learning for elementary students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 2, 2013

pearsontown, just wasn't for us they have many bullying issues that are not going to get fixed anytime soon. After all my sons best friend was getting bullied just because he was australian.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 28, 2012

I I LOVE THIS SCHOOL!! This is the BEST school in Durham!!! The quality of education at our school is amazing. We strive to meet the needs of ALL of our students at Pearsontown. We have excellent teachers and teacher assistants. The MAIN focus for teachers and teacher assistants at Pearsontown is the STUDENTS. If you are considering this school, please send your child(ren). We would LOVE to have them join our Panda family!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted February 27, 2012

Hard working teachers, teaching assistants and staff are the people you will find at Pearsontown Elementary School. This year has been a challenging one for everyone one at Pearsontown, all the staff and the parents. Each day I come to work excited to be with my students, I seek advise from colleagues and look for fun innovative lessons and activities. Despite some of the challenges we have faced this year, I am proud to be a teacher at Pearsontown and plan to spend as many years as I possibly can at this school. I feel so very blessed to be a part of this school. It is my hope that we can stop posting so many negative things and start focusing on all the wonderful things that happen at Pearsontown. Change is in your hands and mine and I plan on making to best of my year.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted February 27, 2012

I love my school and I love my students. If I could not work at Pearsontown, I would not be a teacher. I have had offers for much more money based on my prior experiences. The reason Pearsontown has AIG students in classes with only certified teachers is based on a North Carolina General Statute. But there are students who are not identified as "AIG" who are also in class with certified teachers. Change is difficult, but it is everywhere. Just remember "poly" is latin for many and ticks are those little blood suckers... thus politics are simply many little blood suckers. They have nothing to do with children or their education if we all remember that and to everything we can possibly do to help our future generation!!!!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted February 26, 2012

The reputation of Pearsontown changed before the current principal arrived. The last principal left a chaotic mess at the school while revamping some of the programs. Stop pointing fingers at each other and try to solve the problem. Maybe the current principal could adjust her leadership style. However, some of the teachers need to come off their thrones of glory and look in the mirror. Grow up and act like professionals. My child comes home almost daily sharing information about what is going on at the school. Stop talking in front of the children, they are listening. It makes you wonder, if all of this dialog is happening in front of the children who is teaching and monitoring them. This is a very sad situation. Teachers and staff, if you are not happy why not look for a job elsewhere. I want my chld to be educated, not taught to gossip. Parents, teachers, administration and community lets bring Pearsontown back to the stop.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 26, 2012

Pearsontown is not what it seems.It is not one of the top schools in DPS. The current principal is not bad. It could be worse. She is an advocate of at risk kids and provides tutoring before and afterschool as well as intervention. I also like how child care services are provided for select students in several classrooms during intersession and afterschool.This is a savings for some due to the fact that this not through DPS Community Education which is extremely costly. No other school offers. Test scores are high when you have AIG students clustered in one class per grade level and a select student population are accepted in. Not fair. Some of the teachers, assistants, and staff are obnoxious and unprofessional. Some talk to the kids unappropriately and if the teacher do not like your child or parents the child is targeted or belittled. The school is very old and needs to be renovated. I think more parents are speaking out about Pearsontown now because fingers are being pointed . I encourage all parents to speak out and let your voices be heard. The community should be aware of the fact that there are other schools better than Pearsontown. Think twice before enrolling your child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 13, 2012

Pearsontown Elementary has had the reputation for being one of the highest performing schools in Durham for many years, even when adapting to various leaders and their leadership styles. While I may not agree with everything that Dr. McLaughlin says, I respect her and her ability to help us maintain the status of excellence. Change can be hard, especially when we whine and lose focus on what is best for our children. I have found our principal to be a good listener. So, Instead of talking about her, talk to her. Let's direct our stress where it should be-- on added local and state mandates.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted February 13, 2012

I am very pleased with the administrative team, teachers, and staff. My child was very fortunate to get into such a wonderful school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 3, 2011

My kids(now 5th & 4th graders) started attending this school since Kindergarten and all I have is just praise for this school and its teachers. This school has the most hardworking teachers I have known. We moved to Wake county to cut down down on our commute time since my husband & I both work in downtown Raleigh, but this Durham county school has a lot more to offer than the wake county schools do. Their teachers are very good, highly organized, communicative with parents, innovative teaching styles( ABOLUTELY LOVE Ms. DeChesere, MS.BROWN(all time favorite), Ms. Stewart & Ms.Trapp). The curriculum though similar to Wake county schools, seems to be highly advanced and love the new principal too!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 25, 2011

After years of applying my child was finally accepted as a 4th grader. We have been VERY happy with the quality of the education at the school. The school is not the fanciest, but the teachers are excellent.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 5, 2010

This is a really wonderful school. My son has been in Pearsontown since Kindergarten. He is now in the fourth grade and is doing well. The teachers are great!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2010

The staff is wonderful, always a pleasure, the curriculum is challenging & their test grades show it! I also had a brother & sister attend when I was in grade school (so long ago)... :)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2010

I feel that my daughter has been and continues to be challenged to development academically and socially. I believe the year-round schedule is beneficial to the students and teachers. The students are able to retain information and are well prepared to start the next grade after a short, yet effective summer break between starting a new grade. I also feel that the intersession breaks allow the students and teachers time to rejuvenate and rest and come back prepared to continue learning and teaching.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 13, 2010

The principal involvement is very impressive. I enjoy the continous activities for the children and they continue to challenge them in class. The african american museum was so impressive and inspiring. I still tell people about that today. I am a little concerned about the budget cuts especially the teacher assistants. I hope there is a plan to cover such a great loss.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 10, 2010

I dissagree with the parents complaining about the communication and leadership of the principal. I wonder how much time they have spent at school activities?. I I've found the current principal to be much more communicative and approachable than the previous principal. He has participated in many of the extracurricular activities that these parents claim the school doesn't have such as Movie nights, international nights, walk/running club, walk to school, basketball nights, breakfasts with P, etc.), . True, the school doesn't have organized sports after school, but do any other Durham Elementarty schools? I believe our children (4th grader + 1st grader both at PT since kindergarten) have gotten a good education there. My main beef would be with the general discplinary style of the school. It seems too rigid much of the time (no talking in halls, etc.), ...perhaps related to student:teacher ratio?. I also liked the AIG program (needsX)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 26, 2010

For the most part the school is great. I have sent two of my children here, but the new principal is awful at communicating with parents and teachers. I think he's the reason a lot of teachers left and the school is deteriorating. Seems like those things have gone way down hill just in the last couple of years.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 4, 2010

We had planned on moving to Chapel Hill within the next year because of the perceived superiority of their schools, but our experience at Pearsontown has changed our minds. We bought a larger house in Durham and plan on staying. We have been extremely satisfied with how much time and effort our son's teacher, the school counselor, and both the principal and vice-principal have put in to help our son with problems he's had with transitioning from day care to kindergarten. They have gone above and beyond the call of duty to help him be successful in class. Our kids' teachers have been uniformly great, and I recommend Pearsontown highly to anyone.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

131 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

131 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

146 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

146 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

144 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

144 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
89%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

146 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
75%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students70%
Female72%
Male67%
Black65%
Asiann/a
Hispanic43%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Economically disadvantaged55%
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilities21%
Non-disabled students75%
Limited English proficiency18%
Proficient in English74%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant70%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students61%
Female65%
Male57%
Black52%
Asiann/a
Hispanic21%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Not economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilities7%
Non-disabled students68%
Limited English proficiency9%
Proficient in English66%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant61%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students60%
Female59%
Male62%
Black48%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students61%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English61%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students60%
Female57%
Male65%
Black53%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students62%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English62%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students59%
Female59%
Male59%
Black54%
Asiann/a
Hispanic46%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Economically disadvantaged37%
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students62%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant59%
Academically gifted95%

Reading

All Students50%
Female49%
Male51%
Black42%
Asiann/a
Hispanic36%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White91%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Not economically disadvantaged65%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students53%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English52%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Academically gifted95%

Science

All Students56%
Female50%
Male63%
Black49%
Asiann/a
Hispanic46%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students58%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English56%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant56%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 57% 26%
White 26% 52%
Hispanic 9% 14%
Asian 4% 3%
Two or more races 4% 4%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 34%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


Help other families

Millions of families turn to GreatSchools for help with their
school search. You can help these families by providing
a few details about this school.

Administrators & teachers: Let your school shine!

Help your school shine online by adding program highlights, photos and more on GreatSchools! Get started »

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

4915 Barbee Road
Durham, NC 27713
Website: Click here
Phone: (919) 560-3964

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools




St. Sya Academy
Durham, NC




ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT