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Greenwood Middle School

Public | 5-8 | 526 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

2 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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12 reviews of this school


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Posted June 22, 2013

When I moved to SJAFB last year I was scared because I heard some things. But we were not disappointed because we went in believing for the best and got it.. My child had a great year in 6th grade. We are a dual active duty military family so we NEED to trust the school staff. My child's 3 teachers cared. Can't rate the principals because I did not have to deal with them. Thank goodness:)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 20, 2013

My daughter is getting bullied at the school and all the teachers are doing is telling her to ignore the kids. unfortunetly there is only but so much a child can ignore. My daughter took actions into her own hands we have talked to her about how to handle things. Ever since she got into the 7th grade she went from an A student to a barely C student, her confidence has gone down and I have become worried about her. I went to the school because the kids had taken my daughters personal books and hid them. I admit I lost some of my cool and used a curse word (but not the worse one in the world and the only people around was my daughter and her teacher) and the princial walked me out like i was going to do something to the kids i would never hurt a kid things like that disgust me! My job as a parent is to protect my child, she does not feel wanted at the school. I am about to call a lawyer to see if there is anything I can do and I'm sending the board of ED an email about this school. I wish there was more I could do!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 8, 2012

We are so happy to be OUT of this horrible school! Most of the previous posters are right on with the negative reviews. The one dated 3/28/12, however, is highly suspicious. We are quite familiar with these teachers and do not share in this praise. C mon-what 5th grader uses expressions like don t quite understand a concept ?! The rest are accurate: teachers do bully and belittle students, parents are not welcome, communication between school and home is poor. A few specific comments: Daily fights between students while teachers socialize, ineffective use of disciplinary measures in place in favor of silent lunch day after day after day, nothing for kids to do on the rare occasions they get to go outside (one ball for 100 kids on an abandoned parking lot ) I could write volumes about this school, but will try to summarize: Poor quality, and lacking, in every area, about covers it. The principal seemed proud of the dramatic decrease in enrollment between 5th and 6th grades. Gee, wonder why enrollment drops? Parents with other options get their kids out of there before any more damage is done. Please take the advice of the believable posters and find another school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 4, 2012

I have had the worst experenice with GMS some 7th grade teacher's are rude and say rude things to the students. (wait let me back track). I had the best experience with the 5th and 6th grade school officials at GMS. Problems started when my child entered the 7th grade. I think the prnicipal need to run her school accordingly and deal with issues and conerns that arise. My thing is everyone is talking about Bullying between other students. What about the bullying school officials are doing? I assummed a teacher is there to teach and educate the students not belittle them. So, parents please listen to your child and don't assume it's always them some school officials are GOOD at manipulating a situation to make your child the victim. Not a HAPPY parent.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 28, 2012

I love greenwood! My teachers in 5th grade Ms. jordan,Mrs Smith and Mrs. Johnson have been very helpful when i don't quite understand a concept.


Posted October 26, 2011

Huge lack of communication, discourage parent involvement, lack of concern for student success. If Air Force, transfer out of district or pay for private school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2011

So far not really likeing Greenwood. The teachers are very terrible about any communication to parents. Being first time parents to that school they have not been very welcoming. I really wish SJAFB would have a school on base for our kids. Giving it a couple of more weeks and them homeschooling.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 22, 2010

If you are considering enrolling your child at Greenwood Middle School run the other way. This is the worst school my children have attended. The teachers don't give the children or parents the time of day and the administration is useless. This school does a complete disservice to SJAFB and the Goldsboro community. Our military children deserve better.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 29, 2009

The teachers are wonderful at Greenwood and will do their best to help your child succeed. Mr. Allen and Ms. Harris are a good team. Mr. Allen is laid back and my child's grades are much better in math now. Ms. Harris is a firm and fair teacher who goes the extra mile to help the students learn and communicate with the parents. My only complaint is the textbook shortage.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 4, 2008

The teachers are very mean and the bathrooms are not well kept.The school is very old and it is not fit for student to come to school in.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 20, 2007

I went to Greenwood Middle school from 5th to 8th grade and it was pretty nice. The only downside was the appearance of the school including bathrooms. I had a lot of fun in middle school. In 8th grade, I had the two greatest teachers ever! Ms. Mull and Ms. Lanier were so caring and compassionate about thier students. I was a cheerleader in 7th and 8th grade and it was easy to make friends. No matter what class, sport, or club you are in, you will have fun at Greenwood Middle School.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 30, 2007

The principal, faculty & staff are wonderful at Greenwood Middle School. It is a safe environment and academics are the top priority. The AIG program at GWD gives the students and unparalleled opportunity to set and meet goals that are wonderfully designed to meet both the state and local standards as well as AIG special needs. The caring staff and high expectations help to create an outstanding school as well as a safe and friendly environment!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
68%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
67%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

149 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
79%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

149 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
72%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

125 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
34%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

124 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

114 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

114 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
66%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
59%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students27%
Female31%
Male24%
Black22%
Asiann/a
Hispanic18%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White33%
Economically disadvantaged19%
Not economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disabilities6%
Non-disabled students32%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English28%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant27%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students29%
Female34%
Male24%
Black20%
Asiann/a
Hispanic24%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White39%
Economically disadvantaged23%
Not economically disadvantaged46%
Students with disabilities17%
Non-disabled students32%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English30%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant29%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students27%
Female31%
Male22%
Black13%
Asiann/a
Hispanic35%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White39%
Economically disadvantaged23%
Not economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilities17%
Non-disabled students28%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English28%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant27%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students35%
Female39%
Male32%
Black22%
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracial58%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White47%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilities15%
Non-disabled students39%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English36%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant35%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students40%
Female44%
Male38%
Black28%
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracial75%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White59%
Economically disadvantaged35%
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilities23%
Non-disabled students44%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English41%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant40%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students34%
Female38%
Male31%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Hispanic47%
Multiracial40%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White34%
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantaged45%
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students40%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English36%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant34%
Academically gifted82%

Reading

All Students40%
Female40%
Male39%
Black25%
Asiann/a
Hispanic33%
Multiracial40%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilities22%
Non-disabled students44%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English41%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant40%
Academically gifted91%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students37%
Female42%
Male32%
Black24%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial50%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White52%
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilities21%
Non-disabled students41%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English38%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant37%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students39%
Female42%
Male36%
Black31%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial70%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White42%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Not economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilities25%
Non-disabled students42%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English39%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant39%
Academically gifted-95%

Science

All Students52%
Female53%
Male52%
Black42%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial70%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Economically disadvantaged46%
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilities30%
Non-disabled students58%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English53%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant52%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

24 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-95%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students-95%
Female-95%
Male-95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantaged-95%
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students-95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English-95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-95%
Academically gifted-95%

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 52% 26%
White 25% 52%
Hispanic 11% 14%
Two or more races 8% 4%
Asian 3% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 72%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
Nurse(s)
PE instructor(s)
School psychologist
School social worker/counselors(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Computer lab

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Photography
  • Printmaking
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mrs Rolanda Best
Associations
  • SACS
Fax number
  • (919) 751-7201

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Art room
  • Cafeteria
  • Computer lab
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Music room
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
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Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Football
  • Soccer
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Photography
  • Printmaking
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Join PTO/PTA
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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3209 East Ash Street
Goldsboro, NC 27534
Website: Click here
Phone: (919) 751-7100

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