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GreatSchools Rating

The Early College At Guilford College

Public | 9-12 | 194 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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5 reviews of this school


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Posted January 20, 2014

Yes, it is a large amount of work, but the students start school in early August and finish in late May, with fall, winter, and spring breaks. Almost all the college amenities are open to the students, excluding dormitories of course, and students are given freedom to do whatever they want on their lunch hour. The curriculum is difficult, at least for the first two years, but then you are in the college classes and the workload slows. It could certainly improve some areas, such as lockers for students, but the teachers understand the amount of work, and they are lenient. The atmosphere is a lot more welcoming then a normal high school, and with only roughly 50 kids a grade, you become friends with everyone. There are also fun activities, such as a parents-sponsored activity each month, ranging from a dance, to ice skating, to a gingerbread competition, & everything in between. ECG is certainly better than any other high school, as the faculty want to see you succeed, and they encourage you on the way. There is a lot of busy work, and a moderate amount of projects, but anyone who is considering attending should, for the sense of well-being and accomplishment, not just the education.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 18, 2013

The most talented children in the county spend their first two years completing worksheets at ECG.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 29, 2013

This school looks great by the numbers, but be aware that it is not just "a lot of work". It's a ridiculous amount of work. My child is often up until 2:00 AM doing assignments. This school definitely values quantity over quality. It also places very little value on creativity, and technology use is practically non-existent. In addition, it has some lazy teachers who value busy work. One of the teachers on staff - also one of the highest paid teachers in Guilford County - does not teach; she gives students tons of books and articles to read and worksheets to complete; she even lets upperclassmen grade a majority of student assignments. The same teacher is pretty clueless about technology, and even though nearly every student has a laptop, she requires them to turn in handwritten note cards and to keep up with and turn in reams and reams of paper. While this school has some very appealing qualities, they really need to reevaluate their mission. The 9th & 10th grade years are much more difficult than any college experience I ever had. There is too much emphasis put on volume of work and too little emphasis on problem-solving, technology, creativity and depth of thought.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 20, 2007

This is the high school we'd been searching for. Yes, it is academically challenging. Yes, the students are independent thinkers and are given the opportunity to push themselves and to experience college courses. But something unique about ECG that isn't often pointed out is the supportive community. Students say they feel as if they've finally found a place where they fit in, where academics are celebrated and encouraged. Upperclassmen support and mentor underclassmen. You'll see seniors who are friends with freshmen, which doesn't often happen in other schools. Rather than competing against each other, students mentor and tutor other students in an encouraging way, rather than trying to outscore each other. Since it is a smaller school, everyone knows everyone else and the clique atmosphere that you see in so many other high schools is missing here. It's an amazing school, both for academics and for socialization.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 23, 2006

This school is a dream come true for the right students. Finish most HS req's the first two years, take college classes the next two. Get dual credit. Work really hard. Extracurriculars are available, but varsity sports are back at the 'sending' school. The school maintains a dynamic balance between college and high school cultures. Students have more freedom and a lot more responsibility than in a 'traditional' high school. Parents are very actively involved. Teachers get better every year as they and the school gain experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 56% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 64% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a
Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2011.

48 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a

Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 82% in 2011.

46 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

49 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-95%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Civics and Economics

The state average for Civics and Economics was 80% in 2011.

51 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
>95%
English I

The state average for English I was 83% in 2012.

48 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-95%
Physical Science

The state average for Physical Science was 77% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
United States History

The state average for United States History was 82% in 2011.

52 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Students-95%
Female-95%
Male-95%
Blackn/a
Asian-95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students-95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English-95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-95%
Academically gifted-95%

English II

All Students-95%
Female-95%
Male-95%
Blackn/a
Asian-95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students-95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English-95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-95%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 49% 52%
Asian 31% 3%
Black 9% 26%
Two or more races 8% 4%
Hispanic 2% 14%
American Indian 1% 1%
Pacific Islander 1% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 9%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Ms Bobby Ann Hayes
Associations
  • SACS
Fax number
  • (336) 316-2858
School leaders can update this information here.

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5608 West Friendly Avenue
Greensboro, NC 27410
Website: Click here
Phone: (336) 316-2860

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