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Falkland Elementary School

Public | K-5 | 439 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

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2014:
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2013:
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2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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17 reviews of this school


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Posted January 6, 2012

We withdrew our son after he was attacked by another student. This school has very serious problems with leadership, and keeping children safe. Could be one of the worst schools in the county. If your child goes here, make sure everyday to ask them how everything is going, and if you start seeing problems with behavior and such prepare for a battle from everyone. Your better off homeschooling.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 18, 2011

this school spends to much time on discipline and not enough time on providing children with the motivation, love, and support that they need in order to be successful learners. There are many successful students attending Falkland that make the principal's list and/or honor roll, but seem to have some sort of behavior problem (ACCORDING TO TEACHERS AND THE ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL), But I think this proves that there is a lack of nurturing, wisdom, and understanding in that school's environment and that authorities should look into an issue such as this.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 21, 2011

Mr. Teel was an awesome prinicple I miss him, despite all the trouble my children had here. Some of my neighbors have removed thier children due to the fact of teachers saying negative comments to the students. The issues are really never resolved. The new principle I have not met but she signs her name to paperwork without even knowing a person. They need better orgnization and implementation. They need better strategies between student teacher relationships, and parent school staff relationships. It could be a good school but after a year of experience they havent made it yet. They need better staff with positive attitudes that won't send children down stream.


Posted May 17, 2010

When my child was having trouble with his work and needed a tutor the principal told me to go to Sylvan. Who could afford that? I was refused access to my kids when they forgot their lunch box at home so i threatened to contact the media and the tune changed but i shouldn't have had to go that far.The pricipal changes rules every week without knowledge, input, nor due process. My kids were fed fruit water and bread when they had lunch money.If for some reason you pay for a field trip and can't go you can't get your money back.The teachers even dislike some of the schools processes and the leadership which strongly needs restructuring. I wouldn't recommend no one to send their child because you have no one on your side to help your child succeed.Funds are not used in the best interest of the children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 29, 2010

This is the third year my child has gone to this school. We have had nothing but problems. She is a straight A student. The first time she got in trouble with something she got ISS, even though the hand book states that there should be a different punishment. Also I have witnessed were there was an emergency for one family and the lady was on the sign out list to pick up the children and the school would not let her pick up the kids. I have spoken to so many parents that have similar stories.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 16, 2009

I agree with what this parent has stated. I am a parent with two kids in this school and my kids never had write ups until they got here. They have had issues on the bus also. I am upset at the fact that when you have problems and want to talk to the principal they always send you to the assistant. They have weird rules and are not family friendly. You can't bring any younger siblings to any functions that they have. I wanted to spend some time in the class with one of my kids because of a behavior issue so I could see what was going on with him and they wouldn't let me do that. I also asked for my child to be moved to a separate location in order to stay focused and learn better but that was an issue due to other kids being isolated.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 2, 2009

This is our first year at Falkland and so far it's been really good I have 3 there. I wish they would give more homework other than spelling words every week but thats something that I would need to talk to the teacher with.The only problem i really have is I don't like the PTA the parents don't get to give any in-put on any kind of event that would be good to use, that's something that would need to be talk out with the principal. Over all its a good school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 8, 2008

I have two children here and could not be happier. In defence of Mr. Teel and his 'rules', I am all for them. Every child is not the same nor their home life. There are rules put into place for a reason that your situation may not understand, but someone else needs them. You need to understand all walks of life are under one roof, and have to share the same set of rules. I for one admire the rules in place here, being a single parent who is in fear of another parent getting her children. The fundraiser, pictures and other donations could be stretched a little further apart, it is hard when you have multiple children. But then sometimes we have to say no. That is a lesson our children need to learn too.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 25, 2008

Falkland is a great school. My kids have received an excellent education despite the slant in racial diversity (meaning a lot of their students can't even speak english). The Principal and staff have gone out of their way to support education. The facilities are in great need of updating. However, I have to look at the broader picture. New facilities does not mean great educators and old facilities does not mean bad educators.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 30, 2008

this school is so neat and when my child comes home thats all she talks about
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 13, 2008

My son is in second grade and this is his second year at Falkland. And I wish it was his last! They only have a few quality teachers, my son did not get a good teacher this year, but last year he had an amazing teacher for first grade. I don't think it has a family environment feel. Whenever we take something to school we have to leave it in the office and are not allowed into the school. But they do want our money for fundraisers,PTA,etc. As far as safety and discipline the administration at the school take it as a joke. I have had several problems with other children hitting my child on the bus. And every time I call I hear the same response. The asst. principal listens to the bus driver's story and someone gets written up. Seriously considering homeschooling bc of this school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2006

My child atttended Falkand for 2 years. He enjoyed the school and was challenged by the teachers to do his best. The teachers encouraged reading and my child was rewarded when he met goals. The school has a family atmosphere, and is welcome to all. The principal was open to suggestions and answered questions I had. Great little school.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted January 19, 2006

Our school was one of the few schools who met 100% of its AYP goals. Our kids have always performed very well on end of grade testing due to the excellent instruction and support they got from school staff. Falkland is a school of choice for a lot of other children this year. Our kids are encouraged to exercise daily and enjoy an outside walking trail. In fact, students are given pediometers to wear while they walk. All of our children participate in art and music weekly. Fourth and fifth graders even have the opportunity to participate in strings and chorus. We packed out the auditorium for the winter program. I bet there were over 400 people in attendance. My husband and I have been very satisfied with the education our children have received at Falkland over the past 10 years.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 21, 2005

My child was enrolled in Febuary and withdrew in March. Parents need to know that their are other options and not all of them are expensive. Homeschool, charter, transfer, and private schools are all avaliable. Falkland schools was not right for my child. It is dirty and in disrepair. The facilities fall short of what is necessary to facilitate a good learning environment. Children remain indoors and miss much needed outdoor activity time/recess/ excersize because the staff does not want to go outside in the cold. In the short time my child was there she brought home more tales of thefts and dangers than she should have in a full year of school. I would not recommend this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 24, 2005

My daughter attended kindergarten here. The teachers and staff are great, but we pulled her out and sent her to private school because the racial balance is unfair.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 16, 2004

I currently have a child attending Falkland, and my experience has not been positive at all. I can't seem to get much cooperation with from the staff on many issues. They've made me feel like I'm 'butting in' when I inquire about things. I'm an involved parent and like to stay informed. Falkland seems to foster a 'it's none of your business how your child is progressing!' type of attitude.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 26, 2004

I do not like this school, as long as the kids are doing good there is not a problem. If a child is not adjusting, there is not any help offered, only suspension. My child is in the kindergarten.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
83%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

70 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
60%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
87%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
25%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
63%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
17%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
47%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students30%
Female37%
Male26%
Black22%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White44%
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantaged40%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students31%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English30%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant30%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students30%
Female37%
Male26%
Black23%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White38%
Economically disadvantaged24%
Not economically disadvantaged45%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students31%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English29%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant30%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students45%
Female37%
Male53%
Black40%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilities20%
Non-disabled students49%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English46%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant45%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students25%
Female26%
Male24%
Black22%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White25%
Economically disadvantaged20%
Not economically disadvantaged41%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students29%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English25%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant25%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students44%
Female56%
Male34%
Black40%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Not economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students49%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English46%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant44%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students30%
Female39%
Male23%
Black19%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White50%
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students34%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English30%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant30%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students17%
Female22%
Male12%
Black11%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White31%
Economically disadvantaged13%
Not economically disadvantaged31%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students19%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English18%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant17%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 66% 26%
White 25% 52%
Hispanic 6% 14%
Two or more races 2% 4%
Asian 1% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 79%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Ms Shammah Barrett
Associations
  • SACS
Fax number
  • (252) 752-3017

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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503 North Carolina 121
Greenville, NC 27834
Website: Click here
Phone: (252) 752-7820

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