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GreatSchools Rating

Phoenix Academy Inc

Charter | K-6 | 730 students

Phoenix is known for personal, caring environment with high expectations.

 

Living in High Point

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $136,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $680.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 8 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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30 reviews of this school


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Posted February 18, 2014

Having lived in the area for over 10yrs I've heard great things about Phoenix. Needless to say when we had to pull our child out of private school I didn't give a second thought to enrolling him at Phoenix. Overall, I could not be more disappointed in this school. IF you decide to enroll your child at this school this is what you can expect : - No cafeteria - Tiny classrooms - far too many children crammed in - No playground - only an open field where the kids can run around and a fenced in area with mulch - No parents are allowed past the lobby. This creates a feeling of being 'unwelcome'. - No PTA or PTO so parents are not encouraged to be involved - Incessant requests for money, copy paper, communal school supplies - Mediocre communication and very poor organization - Although GCS provides funding for the school they make no decisions on how the school operates, nor can they assist in resolution of issues. - The superintendent is disingenuous. Don't expect her to assist in resolving any issues. - The principal is very good at resolving issues and is almost always available for parent meetings via phone or in person. - Most of the ladies at the front desk are very kind
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 24, 2014

This is our 2nd year @ Phoenix. We were pretty happy last year but this year it is going downhill very fast. Recently some of the teachers who worked there for more than 10 years left Phoenix and took up jobs at other schools. I have friends who are teachers at other schools in the area and everyone said Phoenix is losing teachers because of bad administration. They highly recommended me to pull out my kid.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 30, 2013

My child has been at this school a few years and compared to other schools it's best for my child. The teachers have been wonderful but the administrative staff has been of less standards. There are things that could be fixed but most of all I enjoy my child's experience. My child is above average for her grade and is being introduced to material that is above the state requirements for public schools. For the most part Im satisfied with the school and my child's education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 10, 2013

This is our 4th year with Phoenix. When we started at Phoenix the small class size is what I was most excited about. This year the class sizes are no longer small, my child has 21 students in their class. They do not have a school nurse on staff in either building. There is not a cafeteria; however they offer a catered lunch at $5 a day. I understand that this (3rd 6th grade) building is a temporary space so I am trying not to be too hard on them however my child s classroom is not even a real classroom, the walls do not go up to the ceiling and there is no door. They still do not have desks. There is no fenced in mulch area for them to play, they play in the parking lot. The temporary building does not have a place to come eat lunch with your child. Expansion, last I heard they are trying to obtain a more permanent space for 3rd 5th grade however it will still be in a separate building than the K-2nd graders and a different building from the middle school students. Remember no nurse, no cafeteria, and no playground and if you have more than one child remember multiple school buildings with car lines for each building.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 6, 2013

Indeed it is a good school when compared to the rest in the area. 6th grade started with the right foot even though they forced the students to buy a PT uniform with the school logo on it and didn't give the chance to just buy something similar at a retail store...Its October and the uniforms have not arrived and for sure I don't think they will make the kids wear shorts during the winter months. Also there are no textbooks since they will be offered digitally but again its October and the promised laptops are not available to the kids to take home. On the plus side they have a police officer to direct traffic AM and PM and he does stay at school all day which makes a great determent for any psychos out there with Rambo delirium. Yes, it a good school not a GREAT school...and still light years away to the Swedish and South Korean Education System which is what we should be striving for.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2013

All I can say is that my 6th grader who just started there this year, with the expansion, is so excited to tell me about what happened at Phoenix Academy every afternoon when I pick him up. From the Core Subjects to the Specialist the teachers try to make learning creative and fun. I only did not give an excellent rating because I felt we had not been there long enough. I will revisit my rating in the spring but am very hopeful!! All the staff have been helpful and friendly.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 14, 2013

Overall I believe this a very good school. My daughter has been here for 3 years, having begun school in a Greensboro magnet school. I know that my child is challenged beyond what she received in her magnet school and has been able to thrive in the smaller classroom environment. The lack of a playground does not bother me because the children are given outdoor recess each day. (Besides, my daughter broke her arm on the playground of her first school...) While there are issues with communication from administration to parents, I believe that the teachers are very dedicated and work with parents to meet each child's needs. My only concern is that the upcoming expansion has not been explained fully. However I do think that because the teachers are so committed, my child, and any other children that attend, will be given a great educational experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 15, 2013

I did not have a good experience at this school. We were there a number of years ago. They made lots of promises for improvement. The biggest one being that they were building a new school building and were asking parents for money to support it. Many years later, there is still no new school building. They are still located in a business park with extremely small classrooms. The teacher turnover rate was very high the year I was there. The special pullout classes (computer, music, art, and library) were extremely lacking. Their playground is a fenced, mulched, back-lot with no equipment. The quality of academics was nothing compared to my kids' current public school. I am much happier with the my local school than I ever was with Phoenix. If you decide to go there, ask lots of questions... like specific dates of when their promised plans will come to fruition.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 5, 2013

We did not have a positive experience at PA. Communication was poor, responses seemed scripted from teachers and administration, parents are not allowed in the school beyond the lobby, there is no cafeteria and the multipurpose room where parents can eat with their child is noisy. There is no playground equipment and while the admin say they always have structured play, that is not true. Books from the library are old and worn and is more like a closet of old books. Kids are not encouraged out of their seat, they do not follow the standard course of study well, the curriculum is pieced together, and kids are expected to be above grade level. If you ask too many questions, it becomes the school that might not be a good fit for you. Students do a great deal of busy work and homework consists of tons of worksheets, and when we were there the school constantly asked for paper. There was no room for self expression or differentiated instruction. Before committing to this school ask, ask , ask questions!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 28, 2013

The school is pretty good. I have not had any issues that warrant me withdrawing my child. As with any school, there is room for improvement. Some of the administrators really don't seem to have the heart to be in this line of work. There is no cafeteria, no play ground equipment. Lunch is catered in and averages around $85 per month. I would say investigage and ask LOTS of questions before enrolling.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 29, 2012

This is an awesome school with great teachers and administrators turnover is low compared to most school from what I can tell, which makes it nice you get to know the teachers and personalities. I LOVE this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 26, 2012

My son attended this school in first grade. There was little to no communication between parents and teachers. We had a very negative experience there. They say they want parental involvement but will not allow parents in the school. You have to wonder about a school that does not want parents in the hallways or classrooms. The kids are in the classrooms all day. There is no library or other rooms for art or PE. I would not recommend this school. I also noticed very poor leadership.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2010

The excellence of teachers at Phoenix Academy and it's child centered plicies have made this an ideal school for my grandchildren. I only wish it went beyond grade five.


Posted October 27, 2009

Fabulous School great leadership. Mrs. Norcross is wonderful!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2009

As a mother of 6 children education is extremely important to me. In the 07-08 yr I enrolled my then rising 4th grader and Kindergartener at Phoenix. Once my 4th grader started school we realized just how far behind she was academically coming from Jamestown Elementary, the teachers and support staff at Phoenix jumped into action working deligently to bring her up to speed and never once did she feel as if she were sub-par. Also my at the time kindergartener was challenged to her level . They base there academics more individually than the public schools I have dealt with. They work with your child on their specicfic level .Just this year 09-10 my son started Kindergarten he just turned 5 Aug 6th so he is young but I know & have seen the special attention he is receiving. They have organized outdoor play, &PE. Art and Music. Great school
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 16, 2008

Great staff and administration!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 8, 2008

This is a great school with low class sizes. There are on average 15 students in each classroom the infomation liated is not correct!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 8, 2008

We have a great school all teachers administrators and staff work dilegently to make sure our students are safe, happy and learning!


Posted July 11, 2008

Sadly, my child did not receive a rewarding educational experience at PA as others. My child was never a 'problem'and I was involved/supported the school to only find out that what my child was supposed to learn in a specific grade, they didn't and came very close to repeating the grade (known to happen very often with one particular ethnic group). My observations leads me to believe that this school is no place for people of color. Staff/teachers are afraid to make suggestions to the administrator. Unusual setting of smiling, yet not producing good results in all children. No playground equip. and lots of dry mud to keep the uniformed white gym shoes filthy daily. I'd like to see impovements in diversity within the classrms and better communication with the parents and teachers. Appealing on the outside...what's going on inside should matter most!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 4, 2007

My son just started Kindergarten at Phoenix Academy and I have been very pleased. I love the teacher/student ratio and the individualization that he recieves. I appreciate the fact they they focus on education rather than extracurricular activities since education comes first in my book. They do offer German classes, art and music. I love it and I am confident he will recieve a good education.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
92%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
84%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

38 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
87%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

38 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
87%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

38 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students64%
Female69%
Male57%
Black46%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students64%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English64%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant64%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students60%
Female66%
Male52%
Black46%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students62%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students47%
Female27%
Male62%
Black35%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White48%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged46%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students50%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English47%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant47%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students51%
Female46%
Male55%
Black35%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White55%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students52%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English51%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant51%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students47%
Female63%
Male32%
Black18%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White58%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged51%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students50%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English47%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant47%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students47%
Female58%
Male37%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White53%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged51%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students50%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English47%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant47%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students47%
Female53%
Male42%
Black36%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White42%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged51%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students47%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English47%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant47%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 56% 52%
Black 26% 26%
Asian 7% 3%
Two or more races 6% 4%
Hispanic 5% 14%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Gifted / high performing
  • Honors track
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School start time
  • 8:00 am
School end time
  • 3:00 pm
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • Before school
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Mrs Kimberly K Norcross
Gender
  • Coed
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (336) 869-3399

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Classical (e.g., focuses on the "classics")
  • College prep
  • Direct instruction
  • Gifted / high performing
  • Honors track
  • Hybrid
  • Individually guided instruction
  • Outdoor / Farm-based
  • Project-based
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Global
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • No

Resources

Transportation options
  • None
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
 

What are your chances?


9 out of 10students were accepted for the 2013-2014 school year.


Students accepted for the 2013-2014 school year
730
Applications received for the 2013-2014 school year
800

Planning ahead

Students typically attend these schools after graduating
Duke
UNC
Wake Forest
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

4020 Meeting Way
High Point, NC 27265
Website: Click here
Phone: (336) 869-0079

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