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Highlands School

Public | K-12 | 330 students

 

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Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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17 reviews of this school


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Posted July 20, 2013

i love this school, the teachers are helpful and supportive. its a small school, but it is good because one gets more attencion. I will miss it. I made friends that are a lifetime with you no matter hor far one is from another.


Posted August 23, 2012

I went to Highlands School ,I moved here from FLA. I love the small school system. The teacher and students were bonded along with students with other students.I have children in Highlands School I would not put them in any other school. I know most if not all the teachers.As for the principals anytime I have EVER had a problem they have taken action to fix it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 18, 2012

I have been going to Highlands School ever since I was in Kintergarden. And from my experiences in this school I can say that it has been great for me. Everyone one, including the facaulty, staff and students are so warm and welcoming. And work one on one with you. Sure we've had some unstable teachers (mainly in middle school) does NOT mean our school is bad. Honestly its not just our school that have their flaws. It's every other school. Not everything is perfect. And I'm actually speaking for a lot of other people that go here. Highlands is such a great school and we're honestly like a family here.


Posted August 27, 2010

The principal, assistant principal, and guidance counselor aren't exactly warm and welcoming. Some teachers genuinely care about the students others seem to just need the job. The guidance counselor can be rude, aggressive, and lacks many necessary qualities of the job (he doesn't know what he's doing at ALL). Students casually bring up far too many drug and alcohol references even in classes. Staff barely updates students and parents on information that both should know (i.e. important dates, funds, pictures, etc..). Some teachers don't or visibly don;t want to teach their subjects so they hand students textbooks and leave them to it themselves. I feel religion is occasionally thrust into my child's face at least once a week. Students say prejudice comments towards different groups of race or religion in a joking manner. I feel the school tries to mask imperfections instead of fix them.-Not a good environment!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 4, 2009

I have attented Highlands School since 6th grade, so that makes it four years now. Highlands School is not the biggest school, we don't have a lot of people etc.. but i'm completely happy with it. It's an enviroment where students and teachers are bonded by more than just the attendance sheet. Yes, we recieve a lot of criticism about our principals not doing enough, but that doesn't take away from our education. Most teachers here are very strong-willed, they help motivate us all to do better. I'm sure there are 'Negativity teachers,' everywhere and that's just how it is. You can not characterize a school because the principals and a few teachers have a bad reputation. I've been here for four years and i've had my ups and my downs and i continue to see Highlands School as a welcoming, safe enviroment.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 7, 2009

Teachers work together and focus on the achievement of all students. Grades are earned at the school, not given away. The principal at the school treats the faculty in a fair and professional manner, and does his job just fine. All members of the administration are visible in the hallways and in the classroom. So the principal doesn't live in Highlands, and doesn't shop at Bryson's, many of us on the faculty don't live here either.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted January 5, 2009

The previous two reviews (10/08, 1/09) that have been written sould more like an assault against the principal, not a review of the Highlands School. Highlands School offers small class sizes in a positive environment, with minor discipline problems. Highlands School is not a perfect place, but great parents AND teachers work together to offer a great education to every student in the system. We are fortunate to live in an area where there are a variety of options for parents and parents that are not pleased with Highlands School should make the choice that is in the best interest of their child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 2, 2009

Highlands School is a K-12 school that needs serious help. The administration (esp the Principal) act like they are just doing a 'job' - they aren't concerned about the students - they just want the paycheck. Principals in other schools are seen out in the community, active in the community - not traveling back to their home state (Ga) practically every weekend. Time for change or the students will continue to transfer to other schools in the are just like mine did and will continue to do.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 10, 2008

You parents either send your kids to a different Highlands School or Brigman wrote these reviews. Administration has been consistently weak. Jetter is neither part of the community nor is he motivated to be an active leader for the school. Middle School has not been a strength, which is why we continue to lose our kids to Summit, homeschooling and RGNS. The relationship teachers build (with students they like) is the best quality of the school, but the school is not aggressive in raising the bar in education. The school lacks any real program for exceptional children, whether gifted or slow. There is no ESL and the school relies on IF C and Literacy Council to take care of this sector. Highlands and Nantahala remain the red-headed step children of the county. The school could be great, but lacks leadership, progressive teachers and adequate funding to provide quality education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2008

When I enter the Highlands School, I immediately notice how happy the students are. The teachers without exception are engaged and connected with students in learning activities. In addition, I frequently see the administrators in hallways and classrooms engaged with students. I can't imagine a better place for studentsf.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 21, 2008

We have had kids in Highlands school for the past seven yrs. The middle school is their strongest quality point - especially since they've finally removed the Negativity teacher. Too bad it was too late for us. HS still has serious deficit when it comes to the guidance department - even the current head counselor is either aloof of misinformed about too many important things. HS appears to be getting progressively worse each yr - with most of the administration seeming less and less involved each semester. The kids and families are what makes this school !
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2008

Highlands School is a great community school. The principal and assistant principal strive to increase learning for all students. When I walk in the building I can tell that students and staff are happy to be there and have a sense of belonging.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2008

Highlands is a fantastic school with great kids and suppotive staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2008

The principal and assistant principal are uninvolved and uncaring. They have a 'don't bother me' attitude, and are quite rude and unfriendly


Posted June 21, 2008

Middle school teachers are usually hostile to students. Not a happy place.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted June 18, 2008

Highlands School is a great school, however is lacks in leadership. The principal and guidance office are wasted space. They are out of touch with the school and the community. the teachers are great in the elementary level.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 19, 2008

I am very disappointed with Highlands School. It lacks energy, enthusiasm, and passion... It is worksheet after worksheet -- no one is instilling a lifelong love of learning... The principal has no personality and basically is just taking up space. He has done nothing to improve the school nor has be benefitted the school in any way. Someone should look into the number of students that have been pulled out to go to a school 45 minutes away.. charter, private, and other public schools in the county... then ask why?
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
23%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
68%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
67%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
75%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
72%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
62%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
81%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 56% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 64% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a
Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2011.

26 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
73%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students23%
Female27%
Male20%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White21%
Economically disadvantaged23%
Not economically disadvantaged24%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students26%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English23%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant23%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students43%
Female40%
Male47%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White43%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Not economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students52%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English43%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant43%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students64%
Female57%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Economically disadvantaged43%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students77%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English65%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant64%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students64%
Female64%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students71%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English65%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant64%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students56%
Female74%
Male31%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students63%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant56%
Academically gifted90%

Reading

All Students47%
Female47%
Male46%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Not economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students52%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English50%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant47%
Academically gifted70%

Science

All Students50%
Female42%
Male62%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students52%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English53%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Academically gifted80%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students76%
Female82%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White72%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students92%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English76%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant76%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students69%
Female73%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students79%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English69%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant69%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students32%
Female36%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White36%
Economically disadvantaged10%
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students44%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English30%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant32%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students46%
Female43%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White43%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students56%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English50%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant46%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students30%
Female39%
Male17%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White29%
Economically disadvantaged25%
Not economically disadvantaged33%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students29%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English31%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant30%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students43%
Female44%
Male42%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White39%
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantaged44%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students43%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English41%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant43%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students90%
Female89%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Economically disadvantaged83%
Not economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students89%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English90%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant90%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 82% in 2011.

24 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 83% in 2012.

26 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Civics and Economics

The state average for Civics and Economics was 80% in 2011.

29 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
90%
English I

The state average for English I was 83% in 2012.

24 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Physical Science

The state average for Physical Science was 77% in 2011.

11 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
>95%
United States History

The state average for United States History was 82% in 2011.

35 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
94%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students62%
Female64%
Male61%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White61%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students74%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English61%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant62%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Students63%
Female73%
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Economically disadvantaged62%
Not economically disadvantaged65%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students68%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English63%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant63%
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 83% 52%
Hispanic 16% 14%
Two or more races 1% 4%
American Indian 0% 1%
Asian 0% 3%
Black 0% 26%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 46%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Brian Jetter
Associations
  • SACS
Fax number
  • (828) 526-0615

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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545 Pierson Drive
Highlands, NC 28741
Website: Click here
Phone: (828) 526-2147

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