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GreatSchools Rating

Lake Norman Charter School

Charter | 5-12 | 1600 students

We are best known for academics and service learning.

 

Living in Huntersville

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $213,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $900.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 5 ratings
2013:
Based on 9 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

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35 reviews of this school


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Posted April 10, 2014

I am a senior from LNC going to a prestigious college this fall. I am not unique. Many people have gotten into great schools such as UNC, NC State, Clemson, etc. In the end for LNC, it is about getting students into the best colleges and well prepared, which from my personal experience, they have done so. We have the highest SAT average in the area. The administration doesn't show bias towards one sex at all. They do however enforce a dress code, which some girls refuse to follow. They also enforce all other rules listed in the student handbook so if your student gets in trouble for their cell phone or gum it shouldn't be the admins fault for enforcing rules. For students who are willing to work hard, this school provides a challenge and from my conversation from previous graduates it provides great preparation for college. For the most part, the teachers truly want their students to succeed. AP classes are typically very well taught and unlike CMS, they are not the "new honors level." I have passed the 4 AP tests between sophomore and junior year, which could not have been accomplished without the teachers. My only complaint is the level of busy work that some teachers give.


Posted February 18, 2014

Very rigid administration and teachers. Little flexibility and little encouragement for students. Arrogant, "better than everybody else" attitude permeates the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 10, 2014

By and large the school is solid for students to learn and develop, however, the administration seems to think the can do whatever they want without including the parents. Watch out if things get tough the administration will clam up and hide behind policy and rhetoric. Unfortunately, families and students carry the school in lieu of solid admistrative leadership.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 12, 2014

LNC is a wonderful school; you can't ask for a better school for your children. My advice for those who are not happy because they feel their children "don't love the process of education" is remove them and put them back in the wonderful CMS school system. You're free to go, no one is forced to stay.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 11, 2014

Great school, students, teaching staff and administration. This is our 3rd year. No complaints or issues so far.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 11, 2013

I love Lake Norman Charter School! I love how they go beyond for their students and I have made so many friends here. The teachers push us to do our VERY best at all times but at the same time, they can be the very best teachers ever! My favorite teachers will always be from LNC and I always enjoy coming to school every day because the way LNC teacher teach, they make it fun to learn and easy to understand. I don't regret any leaving my old school, and I have learned so much more here. The teachers at LNC do their best so we can prep for the EOGs and so we can be ready for our next year of learning. This school is lottery based, so they only pick their students through a random lottery. I promise that you or your child will absolutely love it here! The principal is also SUPER nice (and very, very, pretty), and the vice principal is very nice too (and very, very, funny!), and I love this school, and I am glad I go here. I have been able to be challenged more than I was ever at my old school. They also have VERY unique and fun electives such as drama,dance,keyboarding,French,Spanish,media assistant, and much, much, more! I really enjoy going to this school, and I am glad I went here!


Posted December 3, 2013

This is our child's first year at LNC, and we couldn't be more pleased. The teachers and staff have been so welcoming and have gone above and beyond to ensure that our daughter's potential is met. Communication between school and home is excellent, and the curriculum is challenging. The students are shown how to learn, lead, and serve at school and through the many clubs. We are thankful for LNC.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 20, 2013

Here is what I think is very important to know about Lake Norman Charter school before you enroll your child. If you have a son who does not naturally love the process of public education, this school will be a nightmare for you and your family! The staff at LNC favors girls who sit quietly in their seats and like being dictated to. Boys do not have it so lucky there. They will tell you at the school orientation that they do a lot of hands on projects, outside of labs in science, we have done ONE hands on project in the three years we have been at the school. The leadership at the school lack as good role models for the student body. Most families just up and leave the school after they exhaust from the constant battle. So in short if you have a boy who is not strong in his own personal desire to succeed academically, you will regret sending your child! I am personally, daily, disappointing with the administrations inability to foster a love for learning in these children!! Lake Norman Charter has taught me the understanding of the saying "a mind is a terrible thing to waist" as boys spend more time in silent lunch and detention than learning useful material! Be ware moms!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 6, 2013

My daughter started this year and I have been so impressed with the way the school is run. She loves her teachers and I am very excited for the future.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 22, 2013

LNC is a great school, but it is not for everyone. If you want to be involved in your child's education and you want your child to be challenged to grow academically and as a person, this could be the right fit. As the parent of both a graduate and a high school student, I can say that the school does a great job of preparing students for college--there is a lot of work involved, but it is worth it. There has been a lot of change in the administration over the years, but they seem to be at a good place now, so hopefully the changes are over. The teachers are great, and the administration always gets back to you--too bad the answer is sometimes not what you want to hear, but they always have an explanation for why they will not change the rules. I am disappointed in the parents below who seem to be upset that they didn't get their way, and they want to blame the school. I am thrilled to be at a safe challenging school, and my children are very happy to be knights!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 21, 2013

As a parent, I am surprised by the reviews that are less that stellar. My children have had a wonderful experience at LNC because of the loving care of both the teachers and adminstration. It is not for every family but if you want a school that will both challenge your child and prepare them for the best possible opportunities while caring for them as individuals, than this is the school. I could not disagree more with the last comment about them not recognizing the abilities of young women; the proof is in what they highlight. Check out their website and the lead story is about the academic achievements of a female student. They want ALL students to meet their full potential and get to the college of choice. It is a school of choice, so if it is not for you, then please consider going to a place that is a better fit for your student than criticizing the school for doing what they promise they will.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2013

This school caters to young male students and should be aptly considered a boys prep school. From the way the administration ignores the needs of our intelligent young women, to the way it admonishes the inappropriate advances female students receive from the male student population.... this school turns a blind eye to the needs of young female students and turns the clock backwards on all that we have tried to do to keep our smart, intelligent, beautiful young students on target to believe in themselves. Very disappointing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 12, 2013

I go to Lake Norman Charter and I can honestly say that I love it. I feel like he teachers do he best they can when it comes to getting you ready for college. Not only have i been taught how to be responsible, but they have also taught me how to organize myself in the way that will benefit me most when I leave for college.


Posted May 20, 2013

Teacher and adminstrative communictaion is terrible. My child was bullied and assaulted on school campus. Little to no communication between parents, students and adminstration and no discpline enforced
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 13, 2012

LNC is not only a wonderful school but an Honor School of Excellence! As a parent whose student who was new two years ago, it has been wonderful to see the quality of teachers, administration, and education that he has received. There is a total commitment by the school toward giving our students the best possible chance to be successful when they are ready to move on to college. There are also really committed parents that put in a lot of time in the PTO, Boosters, etc. which give the school a "all in it for the right reasons" feel. The only thing that could make it better would be if there were chances to get a few more people involved, but I would give this school an A+
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 12, 2012

Parent of straight A student, so this isn't sour grapes. School confuses quality with quantity. Also, most projects are group projects, not individual grades. Biggest complaint is administration, particularly the Assistant Principal of the HS. The rules are flexible if the administration wants them to be, but if parent or student has a reasonable request, rules suddently become very rigid. Never got the sense school was run with the students best interest in mind. Much more concerned about the appearance of the school than the students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 9, 2012

LNC is a wonderful school. Students that care about their academics and learn to be good citizens, parents that are involved, teachers that go above and beyond to help students succeed, and administrators that are accessable and visable. I have read some of the other reviews and while I think that the number of classes can be challenging with the homework, I also think that they need to realize that LNC is a rigorous, college prep school as the charter commands them to be. I for one am thankful for the efforts of everyone to make a great school for my student to be.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 9, 2011

I have two students at this school - have dealt with both the middle school and high school, while I agree with some of the previous comments regarding the faculty - particularly in the office & admin they do not return calls or emails.. Yes the teachers are tough but they are preparing kids for college. Most complaints I hear come from families not prepared to deal th being "involved" in the child's education, to which I say - duh - its a Charter school, it's built on the backs of the families... its just a step up from home schooling. You don't choose a charters school unless your ready to drive them to school, help with activities, pay for activities etc... I agree car pool is mismanaged (a nightmare is an overstatement.. Some of the faculty are young and inexperienced which makes for some msitakes in dealing with the kids needs, its not much different in the public schools. The big difference is that teachers actually want to come here. The real "nightmare" is the amount of homework doled out and the limited time given for projects... they spend more time at home doing school work than they do at school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 28, 2011

I am entering this review for my daughter, whose son was suppose to graduate from Lake Norman Charter school this past June. He did not pass Spanish, so was told he could not graduate. My daughter then called the school, and they were going to retest him, and promised to call back. They do not call back. The employees in the office are rude, and the principal is also rude. It is October and the student still doesn't have his diploma, although he has taken Spanish, passed it and turned in his grades to the school. They told my daughter they don't know how to get a diploma to him, and they are working on it. Shame on Lake Norman!!


Posted February 13, 2011

When I first came during the high school's first year, the school was amazing. The academics were great and the teachers were passionate about the education of the students. As more grades have been added, the school has moved away from 2007. With the majority of the kids coming from the middle school, the high school has now become just like the middle school, bureaucratic. The administration does what ever the parents want. After the recent snow days, the exam schedule was changed two or three times. Kids were told to bring their materials home in case of snow but they didn't. When parents were notified of the change, some complained that there student bring home the materials so the schedule was changed back. The high school is now filled with helicopter parents that blame the teachers for their child's poor grades when in reality, it's the student. Let's just say I am glad to be getting out.


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

193 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

193 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
91%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

193 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

194 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

194 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

197 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

197 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

199 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

199 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
93%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

199 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2011.

187 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students67%
Female66%
Male68%
Black59%
Asian-95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial50%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilities17%
Non-disabled students70%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English67%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant67%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students66%
Female68%
Male64%
Black62%
Asian92%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial50%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students70%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English66%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant66%
Academically gifted91%

Science

All Students70%
Female70%
Male70%
Black41%
Asian-95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial70%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students75%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English70%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant70%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students65%
Female62%
Male69%
Black38%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White68%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged65%
Students with disabilities11%
Non-disabled students71%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English65%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant65%
Academically gifted90%

Reading

All Students70%
Female75%
Male64%
Black48%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilities11%
Non-disabled students76%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English70%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant70%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students73%
Female74%
Male72%
Black58%
Asiann/a
Hispanic64%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged73%
Students with disabilities8%
Non-disabled students78%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English73%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students73%
Female74%
Male72%
Black53%
Asiann/a
Hispanic82%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilities23%
Non-disabled students77%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English73%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students64%
Female60%
Male67%
Black33%
Asian85%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White65%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilities15%
Non-disabled students67%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English64%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant64%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students69%
Female71%
Male67%
Black52%
Asian92%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilities15%
Non-disabled students73%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English69%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant69%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students86%
Female80%
Male91%
Black86%
Asian-95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilities62%
Non-disabled students88%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English86%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant86%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

207 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

203 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

202 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 82% in 2011.

176 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
90%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 83% in 2012.

190 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Civics and Economics

The state average for Civics and Economics was 80% in 2011.

192 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
>95%
English I

The state average for English I was 83% in 2012.

203 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Physical Science

The state average for Physical Science was 77% in 2011.

22 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
>95%
United States History

The state average for United States History was 82% in 2011.

188 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students76%
Female80%
Male73%
Black67%
Asian-95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilities28%
Non-disabled students80%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English76%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant76%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Students78%
Female76%
Male79%
Black36%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilities46%
Non-disabled students80%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English79%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant78%
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Students91%
Female94%
Male89%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilities67%
Non-disabled students93%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English92%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant91%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 79% 52%
Black 10% 26%
Asian 4% 3%
Hispanic 4% 14%
Two or more races 3% 4%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

College readiness and student pathways

Students typically attend these schools prior to attending this school Huntersville (Elementary and MS)
Davidson Elementary
Bailey Middle
Colleges most students attend after graduation University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
Appalachian State
University of North Carolina-Wilmington
Read more about resources at this school
Source: Manually entered by a school official.

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Assistant principal(s)
Art teacher(s)
College counselor(s)
Dance teacher(s)
Gifted specialist(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
Poetry/Creative writing teacher(s)
School psychologist
Special education coordinator
Speech and language therapist(s)
Foreign languages spoken by school staff French
Spanish
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

Awards

Academic awards received in the past 3 years
  • Honor School of Excellence (2009)
  • Honor School of Excellence (2011)
  • School of Excellence (2012)

Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular special education needs
Extra learning resources offered
  • Differentiated learning programs
Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Technology

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Dance teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Poetry/Creative writing teacher(s)
Visual arts
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing and written arts
  • Creative writing
  • Dance
  • Drama
Clubs
  • Student newspaper
  • Yearbook

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • French
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Dance teacher(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Accelerated credit learning
  • Advanced placement courses
  • Gifted / high performing
  • Honors track
Extra learning resources offered
  • Acceleration
Staff resources available to students
  • Gifted specialist(s)
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College prep programs/courses during the year
  • College presentations or information sessions
  • Community college courses
  • SAT/ACT prep classes
  • School-sponsored trips to college campuses
School leaders can update this information here.

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Shannon Stein
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Email
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (704) 948-8778

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Accelerated credit learning
  • Advanced placement courses
  • College prep
  • Gifted / high performing
  • Honors track
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Technology
Level of special education programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular special education needs
Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • College counselor(s)
  • Dance teacher(s)
  • Gifted specialist(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Poetry/Creative writing teacher(s)
  • School psychologist
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • French
  • Spanish
Extra learning resources offered
  • Acceleration
  • Career/college counseling
  • Differentiated learning programs
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College prep programs/courses during the year
  • College presentations or information sessions
  • Community college courses
  • SAT/ACT prep classes
  • School-sponsored trips to college campuses
Transportation options
  • carpool
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
  • Library
School leaders can update this information here.

Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross country
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Track

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing arts
  • Creative writing
  • Dance
  • Drama
Media arts
  • None

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Student newspaper
  • Yearbook
School leaders can update this information here.

School culture

Dress Code
  • Dress code
Bullying policy
  • This school has a bullying and/or cyber bullying policy in place.
Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Coach sports teams or extracurricular activities
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Organize cultural events
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Present special topics during curricular units
  • Tutor
  • Volunteer in the classroom
  • Volunteer time after school
More from this school
  • We value partnerships between and among students, staff, parents, and community. We provide and support a rigorous college preparatory program that enables our students to be successful at their college of choice and beyond. Our well-trained, enthusiastic educators create and nurture an innovative learning environment,which is conducive to students realizing their potential and owning their academic success. We actively promote and celebrate student contributions to the community through service opportunities. We expect all stakeholders to accept personal accountability for upholding the LNC Honor Code. Through numerous extra-curricular activities, we allow students the opportunity to develop self-confidence, leadership, and respect for oneself and pride in their school. Being members of a global community, we promote and embrace an understanding of individual and cultural diversity. We understand that communication is an ongoing process and continually strive to foster an open atmosphere of trust and safety.
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

Submit your application by

January 31, 2014

 
 
Apply now
 

What are your chances?


1 out of 10students were accepted for the 2013-2014 school year.


Students accepted for the 2013-2014 school year
354
Applications received for the 2013-2014 school year
2777
Students typically come from these schools
Huntersville (Elementary and MS)
Davidson Elementary
Bailey Middle

Planning ahead

Students typically attend these schools after graduating
University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
University of North Carolina-Wilmington
Appalachian State
College preparation / awareness offered
College prep programs/courses during the year
College presentations or information sessions
School-sponsored trips to college campuses
SAT/ACT prep classes
Community college courses
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

12820 South Church Stree
Huntersville, NC 28078
Website: Click here
Phone: (704) 948-8600

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