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Morton Elementary

Public | PK-5 | 551 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

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22 reviews of this school


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Posted May 2, 2013

My son has been going to this school for 7 months now. It took us 4 months to even get a parent teacher conference and to top that off that was the first time we even meet his teachers. Even though his grades have come up and we have seen and improvement on that part. We have seen a very bad mood change in our son ever since he started this school. He has been bullied on more then one occasion. Now since he has been sticking up for him self because he the school wanted to do nothing at all, he is getting punished for it. I went to this school as a child and thought it would be a great school for my child. I am really second guessing my decision on that now. They do keep the school looking amazing and have a lot of fun raisers for the kids. My main concern is that you are not notified when your child gets in trouble, you do not have the right to be there when they are scolding as I would say your child. Which very much irritates me, I feel like I have the right to be there to defend my child or make sure he is being treated fairly. Overall we have not had a great experience with this school. I just hope next year is better and we do not have the same problems over again!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 7, 2012

When this year started we were very optimistic. The principal is fantastic, and the school grounds are up to date. The teacher however, we have come to find could not be worse, we will be moving mid-year and I could not be happier about that. This teacher has ruined kindergarten for my child, and I hope her attitude toward learning is not beyond repair.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 15, 2012

My son attends 2nd grade at Morton. So far my experience with his education has been great. My son went up more than an entire grade level in reading since he began half way through the school year. I've been impressed with my son's experience at Morton. Ihope this continues for him well into the next school year as well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 19, 2011

My Sons went there when Mr. Barnes was the principal. We loved it! He was a super principal and the teachers were fantastic. It seems like the school has gone downhill since he left. How sad.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 25, 2011

We've had children at Morton for several years. I can say it started out great when we first got there but it has gone no where but down. This year (2010-2011) has been the downfall of Morton. The only plus to the school is the majority of the teachers are top notch. The failure of the school comes from the top down. If there isn't a change in "leadership" for the next school year my kids will be going to another school. MES had been a Title I school for the past couple years so I'm sure it'll be easy to have them transfer.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 7, 2011

If you research you will find that Morton has failed to meet the standards of learning for more than 8 years. While the staff is friendly, the students are not challenged. My daughter has an excellent teacher this year but last year was a nightmare. My child showed very little progress last year and the teacher's excuse for not grading papers or communicating with me was that grading papers was not a top priority. She also said she felt no need to continue with a child's learning skills once they met the minimum requirements! When I expressed concern, nothing was done. A neighbor has had such extensive issues with a teacher that they are moving to base housing solely as a means of pulling their son from the school since the new principle is failing to help, much the same as last year's principle did nothing for me. Other neighbors are having similar issues and our children have different teachers. Due to complete lack of teacher accountability, the number of bad teaching seeds, and the failing standards, I rate this school as poor.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 1, 2010

THis is our second and final year at Moron. Last year was A+. actually came in midyear last year. Atmosphere was like family from the first. Atmposhere this year is changed for the worse. I dont know the principal in the other posts or the new principals but change is top down and i guess they have decided to change. I cant go there without finding a new rule or reason to stop me from whatever. our teacher is great though.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 30, 2010

Already, my family is missing Mr. Barnes. There's a different feel in the air. I'm sure the new principal is fine, but Mr. Barnes was exceptional.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 6, 2010

I agree. Morton is a great school. Principal Barnes, the assistants, the teachers, almost all the staff, they are good people, easy to deal with, responsive. Maybe a bad apple or two, but very few. I would like the whole group to move to middle school and high school with my children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 15, 2009

The students, parents, and staff at Morton Elementary School are second to none. Morton is truly a 'GreatSchool!'
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2009

I have been involved with Morton for the last 6 years. I have 2 kids that are currently there. This school is A #1. From the Principal, to the teachers, to the TAs, to the whole staff. Everyone is OUTSTANDING!!! They have helped not only my kids, but myself through my cancer and treatments. They went well beyond what they should have. I love this school and would put it way ahead of all the others in Onslow County. I just wish as my kids went on to the higher grades, I could take the school too. No where would they get the teaching, understanding or love anywhere else. Cudos to Mr Barnes (by far the best principal) and the entire faculty for everything you do, each and everyday.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 8, 2009

They are doing a great job by providing care to a special needs child in kindergarten.


Posted October 4, 2009

They are trying to keep my kids on track even with all of the absences they have for my youngests chemotherapy appointments. They fax me the work when they miss and are trying to make my youngests time in school very comfortable. They want to add handicapped equipment to the playground and they are trying to hire someone to follow him around and help him if he needs it. They have been the best support during this time.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 16, 2009

I agree with most of the comments. Morton is a really good school. The admin and parent advocate put out alot of information. If as a parent I dont know whats going on schoolwide its because I am not reading or listening. 3 of 4 teachers have been great. 1 of 4 needed help with communicating with parents, keeping my husband and I updated on progress. But that was worked out. On the whole, I am pleased with the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 12, 2009

After Onslow County redistricted last year my children were transferred from Hunters Creek Elementary to Morton Elementary. I am so happy with the change. Morton is a rural school with a more personal approach to teaching. As a parent of a child under medication for ADHD this school is an improvement over the bigger, more impersonal style of HCES. I wanted to be able to personally observe my child's progress on medication and never wanted to medicate my child but... It works for my son. I was welcomed to participate in his education and didn't have to rely on a counselors assessment, although the counselor is fantastic along with the rest of the administration. The very strong emphasis on core education I feel is the real strength of Morton. I am very pleased with the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 9, 2009

I have now had 3 kids at Morton, in 7 years, with 3 principals. The current principal is very family oriented and kid friendly; impressive, young man. The school feels very welcoming, scores are improving, and as former USMC- the principal and teachers really support the military families. PE teacher could be more kid friendly. Strong art and reading program.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 24, 2008

This school has done very well with all of the students, especially the military kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 28, 2008

There are a lot of great things about this school. But there is not always good communication between the parents and the school. The new principal is trying hard to make posative changes, and the size of the school is growing very quickly.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 23, 2007

Class sizes are great, faculty and staff are on-the-ball and the atmosphere is very friendly.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 10, 2007

The level of teacher dedication is unmatched. Everyone from the teachers and their assistances to the office staff are truly invested in each and every child. It is so nice to see that the care and concern for my child doesn't end with the afternoon bell. I am encouraged to call my son's teacher at any time with questions. I was even given her home and cell numbers. This school is by far the best!!! Not only does the principal know each student by name, he knows their siblings as well. Every classroom has an assistant teacher as well, so each child can receive the one on one attention they sometimes need.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

80 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
75%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

80 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
66%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

86 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
75%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

86 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

91 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
76%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

91 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
70%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

91 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
64%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students46%
Female55%
Male40%
Black23%
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White49%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students52%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English47%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant46%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students46%
Female55%
Male40%
Black39%
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White51%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Not economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students49%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English47%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant46%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students28%
Female21%
Male37%
Black20%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White26%
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantaged28%
Students with disabilities8%
Non-disabled students31%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English28%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant28%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students21%
Female19%
Male24%
Black10%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White24%
Economically disadvantaged14%
Not economically disadvantaged26%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students24%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English21%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant21%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students32%
Female31%
Male33%
Black-5%
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White39%
Economically disadvantaged19%
Not economically disadvantaged41%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students34%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English32%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant32%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students37%
Female41%
Male33%
Black17%
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White45%
Economically disadvantaged32%
Not economically disadvantaged41%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students40%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English37%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant37%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students29%
Female25%
Male33%
Black13%
Asiann/a
Hispanic36%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White33%
Economically disadvantaged19%
Not economically disadvantaged35%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students31%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English28%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant29%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 61% 52%
Black 18% 26%
Hispanic 14% 14%
Two or more races 5% 4%
American Indian 1% 1%
Asian 1% 3%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 50%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Ms Allene Batchelor
Associations
  • SACS
Fax number
  • (910) 353-0103

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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485 Old 30 Road
Jacksonville, NC 28546
Website: Click here
Phone: (910) 353-0930

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