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Jacksonville Commons Middle

Public | 6-8 | 847 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

2 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 4 ratings

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19 reviews of this school


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Posted February 4, 2014

I would like to say that my son had a so so start at first but that could have been normal middle school transition. He is in seventh grade this year and truely loves his classes. The school offeres many rigors classes that other schools do no offer. He has a great relationship with his teachers and feels safe and supported at school.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted November 14, 2013

The school board or state needs to do a complete review of the procedures in this school. I have never seen anything like it. Most schools love when parents are involved in their child's education this school not only doesn't give out information but they ignore you as well. Teachers do not respond to emails or take weeks to respond when you inquire about challenges your child is having. Not just one teacher...many teachers. This is highly unacceptable especially when a child is having trouble in class.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 26, 2013

Is it possible to give a school zero stars? This middle school doesn't even deserve one star. The standards and expectations of students at this school are so low it is scary. A majority of the teachers are not preparing these children for future success in their education. As some of these children advance through their school years it will become more difficult for them, especially since the school seems to lack being able to teach these kids fundamental skills. I know many parents who have fought with the county to have their children go to a different school, parents have decided to pay for private school, and have taken the home schooling route. I completely understand why now. I would avoid this school at all cost. To the parents who can't I just hope their experience is better than mine.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 20, 2013

Thank the lord for my child getting into New Bridge Magnet school! I wish I would have known about magnet schools before I moved here because I would have tried to get them into Clyde Erwin.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 19, 2013

This school is terrible. I would imagine this is what prison would be like.Also I'm fairly sure most computers are older than me.I made this review since there are no recent ones. Update: Nothing has changed.


Posted August 17, 2012

Just moved here from out of state and my kid received a wonderful welcome from the teachers and staff. I haven't had any issues with staff .
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 27, 2012

If you can avoid sending your child here, plese do. There are some good teachers, but they will not stay long. they cannot be good teachers in thsis environement. The administration will say whatever they think you want to hear, and do nothing. If your child is a strogn student they will be bullied and no one will care or they will say your child participated. If you child struggles academically, they blame it on behavior. Children are treated like little criminals with more rules than I could remember. There is no positive reinforcement for good choices and the kids feed off the negative energy. My son had no Science or History homework because they were not allowed to bring books home and the teachers are not allowed to make copies or print wokr sheets due to the cost of ink and paper. You cannot make this stuff up.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 28, 2011

Dito! Honestly...I too have had such a negative experience that I just want to move as far as possible from this area. My mind has already been made up due to the defective system I've been exposed to. It is sad and I honestly don't know if it'll ever change here. Sounds like New Bridge gets the best of the best students there unlike the ones were're forced to deal with on a daily basis. I just can't teach here because the second I try to help one student out who wants to learn, others start screwing around in the classroom within seconds. Basically it's just babysitting and the students who suffer are the ones who actually want to learn. Our system is dumbed down to the lowest 25% of students just to pass them. Then there's a huge lack of support from parents. Some haven't even shown up for conferences yet even though I've sent home letters, packets, made phone calls, etc. Most of the time parents just schedule and then cancel and never bother to sign up for another one until we call them and then it's just more of the same. I'm sure the good students here at JCMS tried to get into New Bridge but weren't lucky enough to get picked by the lottery system. I almost can guarantee it.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted May 27, 2011

Honestly, DO NOT...I repeat DO NOT think you can come here and turn anything around. The system is defective, and by defective I mean the administration is one of the worst in the state if not the nation. The teachers here try to do the best they can within the limits of a broken system. And the sad part is the kids pay the price. The students here learn terrible examples because there is a TOTAL lack of authority and they will test every limit...and they usually get away with it because administration just says don't do it again. So when these same students mess up again do you think they get in trouble, nope, just another slap on the wrist and another verbal warning. It's pretty sad when after a year or two teaching here you realize it's hopeless and just want out.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted May 27, 2011

JCMS is an absolutely terrible place to send your child. Simply put, this school brings the worst out of every student. If he or she is on the bubble of going down the wrong road, like many youngsters are in middle school, he or shee will be corrupted by some group of others. It's just pretty sad when all you hear is how bad the administration is and how they have no idea how to run a middle school. This last line I just wrote should be enough for any parent to consider every other option possible before having no other option. Even then I'd move far away from here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 27, 2011

I truly wish I could send my son to a different school. I don't think there is anyone in this school that truly cares about the students. If you have a straight A student, they'll do fine. But if they require any special attention you might as well forget about it. I think it is unbelievable that when you call the school, you get an answering machine.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 7, 2010

Coming from out of state meant pushing for gifted testing once again, finally accomplished for 2nd semester; our 7th grader likes her teachers and is learning new things. Each grade has it's own hall so students are kept fairly segregated. I am disappointed in the lack of literature being read and discussed. Teachers are helpful when our child approaches with questions. Joined PTO but never hear from them for activities or help wanted.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 5, 2008

I have taught in several states in the last ten years and this school is the worst experience I've had as a teacher. I had really good collegues for the most part but the admistration is truely the problem. They want things to appear as nice as the school on the outside no matter the cost to the actual acadmeic success of the students. I would never send my child to this school.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted March 29, 2008

There are many issues with this school including bullying which is not adressed fairly by the administration. These pst two years were the worst of my sons life. He is doing quite well at another school and his seld esteem has changed dramatically. The school looks nice and brand new on the outside but it is probably one of the worst schools in the area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 11, 2007

My daughter just completed her 8th grade at JCMS. This has been the worst 2.5 yrs of her education. The Teacher's don't care of the students learn anything.. The Administration doesn't even know what is happening in the school. If you are looking to move into the Commons area, plan on enrolling your children in private school if you want them to have a good education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 10, 2007

this is the best school in NC!!!
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 8, 2005

This school has a problem with bullying and teasing and has a reputation for being a 'tough' school. Where other middle schools address bullying with proactive programs at teaching students empathy and insist on respectful student conduct, there is no preventive plan at Jacksonville Commons Middle other than ISS to combat student aggression. Music, art and other programs are available and appear to be wonderful opportunities for students to grow in these fields. Academic programs appear limited in scope compared to other States we have lived like Virginia and New York. Subjects like science, history and social studies are weak areas for this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 24, 2004

Very caring teachers and many programs tailored to the needs of specific students. Wide variety of extracurriculars available. JCMS's choral director is one of the best anywhere. Guidance counselors are great! Wonderful annual career day. Excellent relationship with nearby elementary and high schools. Weakest area is lack of parental involvement. There is a core of supportive parents, but too many limit their involvement to complaints, which are often unfounded.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 24, 2004

Problems are not dealt with in a fair manner and it often takes outside school involvement to get results. Student safety in not a priority in some cases. If you have a child that needs help with problems you will have to chase down those you need to contact.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

269 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
85%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

268 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
34%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
72%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

304 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
24%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
78%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

304 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
67%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

255 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
85%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

254 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
70%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

256 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
67%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students29%
Female29%
Male28%
Black16%
Asian50%
Hispanic36%
Multiracial35%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White38%
Economically disadvantaged20%
Not economically disadvantaged37%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students33%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English29%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant29%
Academically gifted92%

Reading

All Students34%
Female34%
Male34%
Black22%
Asian10%
Hispanic42%
Multiracial41%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White48%
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantaged41%
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students38%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English35%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant34%
Academically gifted81%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students24%
Female26%
Male23%
Black17%
Asian46%
Hispanic24%
Multiracial28%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White32%
Economically disadvantaged20%
Not economically disadvantaged29%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students28%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English25%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant24%
Academically gifted76%

Reading

All Students39%
Female41%
Male36%
Black30%
Asian46%
Hispanic46%
Multiracial52%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White45%
Economically disadvantaged32%
Not economically disadvantaged46%
Students with disabilities12%
Non-disabled students43%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English40%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant39%
Academically gifted76%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students27%
Female28%
Male26%
Black15%
Asiann/a
Hispanic36%
Multiracial33%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White32%
Economically disadvantaged17%
Not economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students32%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English27%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant27%
Academically gifted84%

Reading

All Students38%
Female39%
Male38%
Black21%
Asiann/a
Hispanic45%
Multiracial52%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White47%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantaged46%
Students with disabilities10%
Non-disabled students44%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English38%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant38%
Academically gifted88%

Science

All Students59%
Female57%
Male60%
Black45%
Asiann/a
Hispanic66%
Multiracial71%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White65%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilities23%
Non-disabled students66%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English59%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant59%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students62%
Female63%
Male61%
Black59%
Asiann/a
Hispanic54%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Economically disadvantaged52%
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students63%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English62%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant62%
Academically gifted87%

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 41% 26%
White 34% 52%
Hispanic 14% 14%
Two or more races 8% 4%
Asian 3% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 50%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
Computer specialist(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
Nurse(s)
PE instructor(s)
School psychologist
School social worker/counselors(s)
Security personnel
Speech and language therapist(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Special education / special needs

Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Staff resources available to students
  • Computer specialist(s)

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Sculpture
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Ms Gail Pylant
Associations
  • SACS
Fax number
  • (910) 938-1682

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Security personnel
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Art room
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Football
  • Soccer
  • Track
  • Wrestling
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Sculpture
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Join PTO/PTA
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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315 Commons Drive South
Jacksonville, NC 28546
Phone: (910) 346-6888

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