Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Weddington Middle School

Public | 6-8 | 1091 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 4 ratings

Sweep tile
No Purchase Necessary. Void where prohibited. Sweepstakes begins at 12:00:00 AM Pacific Time (PT) on April 1, 2014 and ends at 11:59:59 on April 30, 2014 (the “Promotion Period”). Open to legal residents of the U.S. and D.C., 13 years and older. Each school that receives a new, published review will get one (1) entry into the sweepstakes, up to ten (10) entries throughout the Promotion Period. See the Official Rules for details. Sponsor: GreatSchools, 1999 Harrison St., Suite 1100, Oakland, CA 94612.

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

59 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted April 1, 2014

My child has been sad to see favorite teachers leave this school, because teacher pay is so low in NC. The school has computers but doesn't have enough money for textbooks. This is especially difficult when it comes to math. NC schools have almost the lowest per student and teacher pay in the country, and this school does as well as it can under circumstances.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 10, 2014

Not very affective with bullying..we have peace out purple out once a month but its not enough. half the kids see it as an opportunity to wear their favorite color. theres cliques, and cheerleaders and football players act as if they are higher than others. bullying on buses, laughing at students when they dont know the answer, its hard to find a place where you feel safe. drama,rumours, im glad im applying to Central Academy of Technology and Arts (Union County Career Center), and amazing school that prepares you for college and beyond, its an amazing high school and id much rather go there than to go to Weddington High School, which i can only imagine is full of even more drama.


Posted May 25, 2013

MWS has been my daughters middle school for 3 years, 6th and 7th grade were fine, Her teachers were engaged, my daughter enjoyed her education and excelled. But 8th grade took a turn from bad to really awfull. One teacher assigned too much homework, forgot to teach and my daughter needed help. I attempted to get help. I email the teacher, 5, 7 days would pass befor I would get a response. Her responses were short, abrupt and annoyed. I have always supported the staff and the tough job they have. But their attitude toward me was rude, How dare I ask a question, how dare I, the parent, get involved in my childs education. They hung up on me, the resorted to calling me names saying I was acting like a child, and being difficult. They refused to answer my questions. The staff and specifically the administration have forgotten that I am the customer. I choose to bring my child to them for education and they have no right to treat me with disrespect, talk down to me or ignore me. The staff and the principal need to realize that they may be paid by the county but I am their costomer and I will be heard even if you hang up the phone on me.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 10, 2013

I love Weddinton middle! The teachers are awesome, the education is great. I cold never have wished for a better school!!!!!!


Posted November 20, 2012

I can't say enough good things about Weddington Middle School. Both of my children attended private elementary school so I was sensitive to their transition into a much larger, public middle school. The exceptional leadership, extremely capable and accomplished teaching staff and the positive, supportive student environment provides the foundation for Weddington Middle, one of this state's most accompished public schools. I would recommend Weddington to any family interested in offering their child a middle school experience that will lay the groundwork for success in high school and beyond.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 24, 2011

I am now in high school at CATA (central academy of technology and arts ) but I went to weddington for middle school. Let me tell you that all 3 years for me were my own personal hell. I was constantly bullied until sometimes I went home crying. I am forever scared by the tourture of weddington I still go to counsoling today and its been almost 6 or 7 months since I left. My only friend. Is still there and she says people still talk about me. If your a good parent and you take your time to read this DO NOT SEND YOUR KID TO WEDDINGTON MIDDLE SCHOOL!!!!!!!


Posted September 20, 2011

My son is in 8th grade and came from a private school in the north. Since he walked in the door in 6th grade, I am constantly impressed with the dedication and committment of the faculty. The principal is extremely focused on the well being and development of all the students. We are thrilled with the enviroment and feel the welcoming and appreciative attitude towards the parents help make the school experience extremely positive. This school is a bright spot in our transplant to NC, and highly reccommend to anyone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 8, 2011

I am new at WMS and I just started 7th grade. I came from Charlotte Preparatory School and I hope to be reunited with that school next semester. At the tour that I took of the school, it seamed nice, and above average public school, nothing to to special. So I was excited to go to my first day of school there, but now, I wish that I never switched schools. There are alot of clicks and other problems like that. I used to be a cheerleader but at this school the cheerleaders are so mean and I never want to be one... There are these girls that just have something agenst me for no apparent reason they are very annoying. So off the subject of social lifes and on to the subject of academics. The academics at weddington are very weak, but this is coming from a girl who went to a prep school so the academics there were outstanding. They are teaching me everything that I learned 2-3 years ago. I am so unhappy in weddington its crazy, spare your child the pain and either send them to charlotte prep, a private school, or a different union county school. Good luck and I wish you the bestin finding a school for you/your child


Posted January 20, 2011

WMS is a great school achademically. I have been here for 2 years and I think its great. I have had no problems with bullys and the teachers ar OK.the principal is good and friendly. The teachers really challenge you to do your best. This is a great school with a great atmosphere. I love it.


Posted October 20, 2010

There is a strong sense of community. The staff is supportive of the students and parents. The teachers go above and beyond to provide the highest level of education. The students are given new and exciting tasks in a wide range of areas.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 6, 2009

i love it there im an 8th grader...and i cant even tell you how sad it is to have to say goodbye in a few months...i have to say that that school is were i have spen some on the very few best moments of my life mr wray (the principal) has made it awesome...my name is sierrah watson...and im an 8th grader at a school where i recomend every child who has doupts to attend
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 23, 2009

This school is doing an excellent job with a very large student population of 3 grades 6-8th (1400 kids) all going through 3 very challenging years of life. Next school year should see a reduction in population due to the new Cuthbertson school and coming from a 450 student middle school I am amazed at the job they do to keep this school so highly rated.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 22, 2009

I am a student at WMS and I cannot say that it is a great school. As previously mentioned, it sticks to the North Carolina Standard Course of Study intensively and leaves no room for students to pursue self-paced curriculums. I believe that this school leaves a lot to be desired and would not recommend sending your child there. In fact, I am looking into private schools as a better alternative to WMS.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 28, 2008

i love the middle school it's excellent


Posted September 18, 2008

My son graduated from wms last year. The english dept. Leaves a lot to be desired!!! He is not prepaired for high school honor classes as they demand a lot of writing skills! Many subjects give essay tests which WMS did not instruct or consentrate on writing skills or how to outline before writing. I feel like I am teaching what should have been taught in 6th grade. This was a big problem which I brought up to the school every year that he attended. They desperately need to institute a new curriculum incorporating reading and writing. All subjects should include short answer questions and short essay's on their tests. Parents...Be pro-active!!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 25, 2008

I am an eighth grade student at WMS, and cannot say that I am very proud to be one. the education sticks, for the most part, to the curriculum. in short: we spend half the year learning how to fill out a test form. In addition, the communication between teachers and students is not acceptable. Physical activity is at the minimum of what is required. The PTSO is now holding a campaign to feed starving horses. The money that they endlessly pry from parents should be put to a more... relevant cause. Teachers only seldom stray from what is required for students to learn, hence repetitive and uneducational lessons.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 28, 2008

I just moved here from New Jersey this year for seventh grade. I absolutley hate the idea of how teachers are more focused on if you have your shirt tucked in, instead of education. I never had any lunch detentions in my old school, but here I have had over 5 for tardies and dress code. Here is an example: I was sitting in my seat and one side of my shirt was not tucked in, I was then punished for that. I understand that if a student stands up and notices a child does not have their shirt tucked in, it is okay to ask them to tuck it in, but teachers look to get you in trouble. I was late various times by about 15 seconds because we are coming from the locker room. The locker room is absolutely insane and there are too many kids.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 15, 2008

I am an eighth grade student at WMS, and cannot say that I am very proud to be one. the education sticks, for the most part, to the curriculum. in short: we spend half the year learning how to fill out a test form. In addition, the communication between teachers and students is not acceptable. Physical activity is at the minimum of what is required. The PTSO is now holding a campaign to feed starving horses. The money that they endlessly pry from parents should be put to a more... relevant cause. Teachers only seldom stray from what is required for students to learn, hence repetitive and uneducational lessons. I cannot explain the numerous awards.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 23, 2008

As a parent of a transfer student and longtime NC resident, I was shocked at how rudely my child and I were treated by the front office upon simply trying to enroll. That should have been my clue to 'run.' The school seems to focus totally on tiny infractions, while missing the big picture of educating and imbuing a sense of passion for learning. In addition the athletic program at the school, in my opinion, is completely political. If your child has not grown up in the area, it is virtually impossible to gain a spot on one of the sports teams. My middle schooler went from playing pick-up games at an ACC college and holding all-star trophies at a well-known baseball program to being left out by Weddington. In summary, my child's experience at Weddington was poor and fell far short of my expectations.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 11, 2007

I am on my fourth child to go through this school. I have not had a bad experience with any of them, but certainly not a good one. Discipline is in my opinion a strength of the school, but teaching expertise/talent is a definite weakness. I get a strong sense that many of the teachers are coasting until retirement. All of my children are good students. Objectively, they probably aren't very self motivated, and could be better students - but, they all have been bored. The 6th grade teaachers are great.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

356 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

356 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

360 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

360 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

365 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

365 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
95%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

365 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students82%
Female82%
Male81%
Black62%
Asian86%
Hispanic56%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Not economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilities39%
Non-disabled students85%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English82%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant82%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students82%
Female85%
Male79%
Black62%
Asian86%
Hispanic38%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Economically disadvantaged60%
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilities39%
Non-disabled students85%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English83%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant82%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students83%
Female85%
Male80%
Black73%
Asian93%
Hispanic56%
Multiracial64%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Economically disadvantaged68%
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilities33%
Non-disabled students88%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English83%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant83%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students78%
Female77%
Male79%
Black70%
Asian93%
Hispanic31%
Multiracial64%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilities42%
Non-disabled students82%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English78%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant78%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students81%
Female84%
Male78%
Black61%
Asiann/a
Hispanic84%
Multiracial80%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Economically disadvantaged70%
Not economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilities21%
Non-disabled students85%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English81%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant81%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students77%
Female85%
Male72%
Black61%
Asiann/a
Hispanic63%
Multiracial70%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Economically disadvantaged55%
Not economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilities25%
Non-disabled students81%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English78%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant77%
Academically gifted-95%

Science

All Students93%
Female94%
Male92%
Black83%
Asiann/a
Hispanic90%
Multiracial-95%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Economically disadvantaged82%
Not economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilities58%
Non-disabled students-95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant93%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

121 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-95%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students-95%
Female-95%
Male-95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students-95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English-95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-95%
Academically gifted-95%

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 82% 52%
Black 7% 26%
Hispanic 5% 14%
Asian 3% 3%
Two or more races 3% 4%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 10%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Steven Wray
Associations
  • SACS
Fax number
  • (704) 814-9775
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

5903 Deal Road
Matthews, NC 28104
Website: Click here
Phone: (704) 814-9772

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools



Socrates Academy
Matthews, NC




Sun Valley Middle School
Indian Trail, NC


ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT