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Queens Grant Community School

Charter | K-12 | 1260 students

 

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Living in Matthews

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $191,800. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $810.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 6 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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48 reviews of this school


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Posted July 21, 2010

Without a doubt this is a warm and caring schoo. This was my daughter's first year in Kindergarten and while the expectations are high, she fell in love with her teacher. The dedication of the parents and quality of teaching staff makes it feel like a private school. The parents shower the teachers with special lunches and the communication is great! There are lots of opportunities for every child to succeed at their own pace and many special accommodations are made to have this happen. No child is left behind as the teachers go above and beyond the call of duty and put in many hours.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted July 15, 2010

This coming school year will be my sons third year at Queens Grant. We have enjoyed each year. I enjoy helping out at the school. The teachers have all been very helpful and nice. I think it is great that the school starts off every morning with the Pledge of Allegiance and a Moral Focus topic (that changes monthly). My boys are getting a great education and have loved their teachers they feel very comfortable with all the staff! I have heard a few complaints about the change in the grading system, change is inevitable, I feel that if you keep track of what your kids are doing weekly with the Monday Mailers (all the work the did the previous week) that are sent home you will know if your child is understanding what they are learning or if they need some extra help (which is available to everyone).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 9, 2010

Queen's Grant has provided a safe, encouraging environment for my son. We left a school where he was just a number-only his teacher knew his name. The principal, teachers and staff all know him and encourage him in his academic and personal pursuits. We loved the school so much that I decided to go back t teaching and I have now been there 5 years!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 9, 2010

Queen's Grant has been the school for my children since it opened. My son is in high school now and doing great! There is a feeling of community in this school that is amazing for a large city. In the 8 years of being at QG, I have been able to help in many ways. I've helped in the library, attended field trips, served at lunch, tutored, filed papers, made copies. During all of this time, the staff have been very professional and extremely caring. My two children are very different in their needs, one child excels at school work and has to be challenged continuously. The other child needs to encouraged to stay on task and taught in different ways so that she can understand. I have and will continue to recommend QG even with the change in grading because I know and appreciate the staff of QG!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 8, 2010

My family loves Queens Grant! The teachers and staff are kind and helpful. My daughter has been successful and really loves school. I am a big fan of uniforms (less stress in the morning), and the students are taught to be respectful and honest. The parents are encouraged to be involved; that makes for a great school! Sally Woods
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 8, 2010

I taught here for over two years and my children have attended now for three years and we love Queen's Grant. You will not find another school that cares about each student's success and needs vs. the overall success of the class. My three children are all different, and they are all taught differently for their individual success! Thank you Queen's Grant!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 8, 2010

My daughter has attended Queens Grant since her first day of school. I'm thankful for this opportunity. My oldest daughter attended CMS. I have experienced first hand the pros and cons. I just wish Queens Grant would have been open when my oldest was still in school. We have never had a problem with this school. I love that I can share in my child's daily routine by helping in the classroom or other areas of the school. Your child is not just a number here. Every teacher and staff member knows your child. The fact that morals and values are stressed is awesome. This is the environment that I want for my child. I know first hand what other schools are available and we are here because it is the best choice for us. Tami McCune
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 8, 2010

I've been a teacher at Queen's Grant since it began. I stay at QG because of the high academic standards, emphasis on moral focus, and staff. I've never worked with such a close knit staff who truly wants each child to reach his/her potential and then go beyond it. We aren't a perfect school and that's okay because I don't know of a perfect school. The negative and positive comments we receive challenge us to learn and grow more so we can be the best that we can be. Come check out Queen's Grant.....it's worth it!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted July 8, 2010

Queen's Grant is an excellent school with challenging academics. The teachers are highly trained and are very good at challenging each child to meet his or her personal potential. It truly is a community that cares for each and every child and family. The students are held accountable for not only their academic achievement, but for their actions and behaviors as well. It is no wonder that every visitor to our school comments on the atmosphere of respect and how well behaved the students are. Queen's Grant is a step above the rest.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 8, 2010

We will be starting our 6th year at Grant this fall. My oldest will start middle school and my youngest in entering first grade. We have been very please with the school. We are able to be active participants in the education of your children. My kids go to school happy and come home happy. It is a safe and kind environment that encourages learning and excelling.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 8, 2010

We have been with QG for 4 years now and have been very happy. The elementary teachers are fantastic. My kids have learned so much! The fact that the school is small, really makes it feel like a family environment. I feel very fortunate to be part of it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 23, 2010

This school was found in violation of 6 federal regulations and state policies pertaining to children with disabilities. You can call the state to find out. If your child fits the mold, your child will do well. If not, go somewhere else. Also, it helps if your child starts the school in Kindergarten so they will learn the "culture" and fit in more easily. Overall, I would not recommend this school. In addition to the above, they have made so many ill-prepared changes in grading that parents are still having problems understanding it after almost a year of informational meetings. So guess how well another school (or college) will understand your child's grades.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 24, 2010

My son attended QG for kindergarten, 1st and start of 2nd grades. We pulled him out and put him at our local school in 2nd. Advice to all parents looking at this school, do your research, look into test scores of this school vs. your home school. We had a miserable experience, we tried very hard - lots and lots of volunteering, tutoring etc... But I drew the line at my son being treated like a behavior problem because he had trouble applying the lesson. My take on the problem was that one teacher with 28 kids, a longer than average school day, the teacher doesn't get a lunch out of the classroom unless a parent covers for them, and no teacher assistants leads to over-worked, over-stressed teachers and the kids that require a little more work pay the price for their frustration. Our entire family is much happier.


Posted February 23, 2010

Queen's Grant is an exceptional school. I'm a parent of 4 kids that all attend the K-8 schoo. Our 8th grader will be attending our high school next Fall. My husband and I have all of our children enrolled at the school, and 2 since it's first year of operation over 8 years ago. Before getting accepted into this school, I had already had high expectations for what we thought the school should offer our children. I'm here to tell you that they met our expectations and exceeded them! We wanted a school with a smaller enrollment. A school that hired extraordinary teachers, and staff support. We wanted challenging academics, and a safe enviroment for our kids. We wanted a school that upheld strong morals and vaules, one that allowed us to get involved and partner with the school. I'm proud to say,' we found each of these and more.'
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 9, 2009

The students are very well behaved and respectful. For a K - 8 school, that is a huge deal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 9, 2009

Our school truly is our school! It is built upon parent volunteers and the respect it breeds among families, students, faculty and administration is fantastic. The kids get daily reinforcements on being 'good kids' and showing great characteristics and leadership qualities. The older kids are encouraged to mentor the younger which forms a great and diverse community. We have a middle schooler and a 5th grader and, having been at this school since Kindergarten, I can truly say this is the only school for us!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 9, 2009

Our school is really a community. Our staff cares for our students and always goes above and beyond what is normally expected. My student seems to love each year more than the previous one. She looks forward to going!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 8, 2009

Excellent teachers who really care about my child! He's not just another number.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2009

I love Queens Grant Community School! I always feel excited to go to school. All the teachers no my name. Each teache rchallenges each child individualy and helps everyone individualy. I feel like I am being more educated than I would be at a public school. I am also very pleased that our school has a program for special needs, has many sports teams, many encore classes, great music, art , and P.E. classes. I would recomend this school to anyone! I mean anyone!!!
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 2, 2009

Queen's Grant pros: As a charter school Queen's Grant is outside of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools. As the paper this morning notes new budget CMS cuts, this is a huge benefit for Queen's Grant. Queen's Grant, at least at the K level, has higher standards than CMS. Also, QG for K students one hour longer than CMS. I also like the idea of the whole school (K-8) in assembly each day, reciting the pledge, and singing a patriotic song. Cons: There is a LOT of hype around this school. You can see the evidence in some of the reviews of parents who are so pro-QG that it's a little spooky. I think the hype is rooted in the lottery system - there's a psychology behind saying 'supplies are limited' that makes you want something more. Parents should always be critical consumers when it comes to a child's education.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
87%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
78%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
85%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2011.

135 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
82%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students50%
Female42%
Male59%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White53%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged51%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students50%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English50%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students64%
Female70%
Male59%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students65%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English64%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant64%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students68%
Female62%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Not economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students77%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students60%
Female55%
Male65%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White61%
Economically disadvantaged47%
Not economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students69%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students51%
Female57%
Male43%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White49%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students54%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English51%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant51%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students54%
Female62%
Male43%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White49%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students57%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English54%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant54%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students56%
Female60%
Male51%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students60%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English56%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant56%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students44%
Female46%
Male42%
Black10%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White49%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Not economically disadvantaged45%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students47%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English44%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant44%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students60%
Female59%
Male60%
Black10%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Economically disadvantaged53%
Not economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students64%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students33%
Female35%
Male32%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White37%
Economically disadvantaged-5%
Not economically disadvantaged39%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students38%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English34%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant33%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students62%
Female58%
Male66%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White61%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students70%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English63%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant62%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students43%
Female43%
Male43%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White45%
Economically disadvantaged13%
Not economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students48%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English43%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant43%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students51%
Female51%
Male51%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White55%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students58%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English51%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant51%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students55%
Female46%
Male61%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White55%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Not economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students62%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English55%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant55%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

132 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
64%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

136 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

125 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 82% in 2011.

69 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
80%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 83% in 2012.

142 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
82%
Civics and Economics

The state average for Civics and Economics was 80% in 2011.

138 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
91%
English I

The state average for English I was 83% in 2012.

153 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
88%
Physical Science

The state average for Physical Science was 77% in 2011.

17 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
65%
United States History

The state average for United States History was 82% in 2011.

97 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
91%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students27%
Female30%
Male25%
Black14%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White38%
Economically disadvantaged7%
Not economically disadvantaged30%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students33%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English27%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant27%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Students41%
Female41%
Male41%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White52%
Economically disadvantaged18%
Not economically disadvantaged45%
Students with disabilities10%
Non-disabled students47%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English42%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant41%
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Students58%
Female60%
Male56%
Black44%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Not economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilities14%
Non-disabled students64%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant58%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 68% 52%
Black 20% 26%
Hispanic 6% 14%
Two or more races 4% 4%
Asian 1% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 12%N/A50%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

College readiness and student pathways

Students typically attend these schools prior to attending this school Bain Elem. or Mint Hill Middle
Private or Homeschool
Lebanon Elem. or North East Middle
Read more about resources at this school
Source: Manually entered by a school official.

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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Special education / special needs

Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Autism
  • Multiple disabilities
  • Other health impairments
  • Significant developmental delay
  • Specific learning disabilities
  • Speech and language impairments

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Mathematics

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School start time
  • 8:10 am
School end time
  • 3:10 pm
School Leader's name
  • Dr Mike Smith
Special schedule
  • Block scheduling
  • Extended/longer school day
Fax number
  • (704) 573-0995

Programs

Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Mathematics
Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Autism
  • Multiple disabilities
  • Other health impairments
  • Significant developmental delay
  • Specific learning disabilities
  • Speech and language impairments
Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Resources

Transportation options
  • None
School leaders can update this information here.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross country
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Performing arts
  • Drama
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Uniforms
Parent involvement
  • P.t.i. (parent-student-involvement) school committees parents are sometimes needed for activities in the classroom, lunch supervision, the office, after hours tasks, field-trips, monday mailers, filling, organizing or preparing group activities, volunteer speaker or classroom reader, open houses, new parent mentoring, pti room rep, room mom or dad, fundraising, coaching or assisting with a sports team or club. these are just some of the ways you can get involved at queen's grant.
More from this school
  • Queen's Grant .....Student Creed I am a Queen's Grant student. I strive to achieve academic excellence. I exemplify high moral character. I work diligently to prepare for the future. I value learning. I will be respectful, responsible, and accountable for my actions.
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
 

What are your chances?

Students typically come from these schools
Bain Elem. or Mint Hill Middle
Private or Homeschool
Lebanon Elem. or North East Middle

Planning ahead

Students typically attend these schools after graduating
Queen's Grant Preparatory High School
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

10323 Idlewild Road
Matthews, NC 28105
Website: Click here
Phone: (704) 573-6611

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