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Queens Grant Community School

Charter | K-12 | 1260 students

 

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Living in Matthews

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $191,800. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $810.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 6 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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48 reviews of this school


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Posted April 3, 2014

There is a very fine line between having involved parents and having another parent knowing my kids test scores and discussing it with other parents!! No privacy, too many kids to a class, no encouragement or push for above average kids, teachers work load is overwhelming for them and they get no help. This school is not what it says it is. Valuable teaching time is wasted on long assembly each morning. Some assemblies are very long and boring for the kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 10, 2014

I concur....while not blinded totally by this school, my daughter spent her first 6 years in the local public school system and graduated 5th grade with a 3rd grade reading level. We were accepting into 6th grade at QGCS and she thrived and has excelled way beyond our dreams. Now a high school senior at QGHS! Parents that complain about discipline not being followed up or teachers that do not care, need to go to the expense and go to private school....my son started in 1st grade and now in 7th and we have always found the staff to be caring and quick to react to any concerns or problems with students or teachers. There is ALWAYS bad apples anywhere and those are weeded out on a case-by-case basis. My son personally had bullying problems with an older child and I feel that it was handled immediately and properly to full resolution. My son love his school and cannot imagine going anywhere else. I hear the horror stories coming out of CMS schools and can't imagine either of my kids still attending pulic school. Agree that other parents can become too involved, but again, that is everywhere and if you don't like it, become involved yourself. LOVE THIS SCHOOL!!!!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 5, 2013

I was just reading thru some of the other reviews and they made me so sad! Overall, Queens Grant is a great school. Yes, they have problems like public schools and like $25,000 per year private schools as well. NO school is perfect. We have been so very happy at this school. My daughters are thriving. I am a working parent, and I feel like I am treated just like the stay at home moms. We have had a teacher or two that haven't been wonderful--and they are no longer there--so yes, teachers are held accountable. I recommend this school to others often. I am a CMS employee, I could send my kids to ANY CMS school--I CHOOSE to send them to Queens Grant instead. My daughters have been taught great moral values at this school, and I know they are keeping up academically as well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 29, 2013

Regan Adam is the only individual at this school worthy of five stars! She is worthy of ten! Unfortunately, the rest leaves a lot to be desired. There is little disciplinary action for both students AND teachers who act out. The teachers are overwhelmed and do not seem to be supported by their administration unless they are part of the in group. Communication is lacking. My child was challenged and thrived in Mrs. Adam's class... after that, I may as well have put him in CMS. We had high hopes, but, in the end, Queen's Grant failed to impress as a whole.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 17, 2013

Queens Grant purports itself to be head and shoulders above the CMS public school system. It is not. There is a lot of complacent behavior among the staff. Parental help in the classroom is begged for; if both parents work, then those parents are not on the same level as the parents who think QG is their home away from home. Busybody moms have waaaaay too much input and involvement at this school. Most staff members act professional, but those that do not overshadow the others. Don't get it wrong: a few run this school, their way. The academics are just average. Because it is a "charter school", and has a lottery for openings, it creates a false sense of prestige. This does not compare to a private school, in any way. One unruly student with behavior/cognitive issues can ruin the day for other students. Imagine that EVERY DAY for your child. Discipline is not followed per the handbook. We bought the fluff initially, but time and experience has removed the blinders.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 15, 2013

This school is run like a junior high clique. Why do parents receive emails about the class from another parent who volunteers at the school? Surely the teachers should be in charge of the class. Too many power tripping parents!!! Professionalism in the staff could greatly be improved.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 4, 2013

My child has been at Queens Grant for two years, and I've been extremely pleased with his teachers and academic experience. I'm looking forward to my other children going here in the future.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 5, 2013

I'm glad that someone noticed that the PE teacher is a Bully. She would have been fired if she was at a CMS school. I have seen her bully and threaten kids. When you try to tell administration they will just tell you that she can seem abrasive, BUT she loves the kids. Anyone who loves kids would see that it is just WRONG to pull a child and push them or point out that they need to lose weight, or ask why are you mean to the PE teachers child. She is always bullying kids and the PE teacher went into her childs classroom and threatened the other kids that they should leave her child alone. Please be aware that she walked into another teachers class and because there was a sub in there, this PE teachers thought she could say whatever she wanted to the class. The Sub had a responsibility to report this and never did. The administration only again talked to the PE teacher or wrote her up.The teacher should not be there. Is the administration afraid to take action?One day a parent is going to report it to someone outside of the school who can truly investigate and not be afraid to hold this teacher accountable for her actions.The students are held accountable, but not all of the teachers
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 28, 2012

Our family has been 100% satisfied with Queen's Grant. Parents must understand that no school is perfect; but at Queen's Grant the administration and teachers are open to listening and welcome the parents input. My children are in a safe and loving environment. We feel our children has received an excellent education academically and socially. The school provides a variety of programs, sports and clubs that our children choose to participate in there. The teachers are highly skilled and receive the support from the school they deserve. The parents are wonderful, and I enjoy spending time with them and interacting with them. I especially appreciate the fact that this school allows me, and encourages me to get involved. It may not be the right fit for everyone; but for our family, it is. I have seen several different schools from the inside (doing my homework) and this school is top notch. It all goes back to what you're looking for. Are you an involved parent? If so, this just may be the right fit. If you just want to send your kids to school and expect the school to do all the work, then maybe you should seek the CMS system. Regards, 100% Satisfied Parent of 4 QG students
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 19, 2012

You couldn't ask for a more loving and caring school. I feel like my children are challenged and we are grateful to be a part of this awesome school. I feel like the concerns raised in the past regarding the new grading system are just there....in the past. There is a lot more understanding, uniformity and organization from the teachers and how the system works for the benefit of the child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 5, 2011

I have never felt so welcome in any other environment. It has been my experience that they individualize work for the kids. I know that my child has been challenged. There is always additional help when the help is required even when you do not ask for it. For parents looking for school it would be wise to not think that any school is going to do 100% of the work. Parent do play a major role in the education of their child. I do get a private school feel and I would not have my kids in any where else. PARENTS NEED TO BE INVOLVED AND NOT EXPECT SOME ONE ELSE TO GET IT ALL DONE.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 31, 2011

We have been at this school for two years. With my child going into 2nd grade next year, I am saddened to say that we will not be returning. We wanted a private school atmosphere, but this school is far from that. It truly has a public school mentality with administration acting like they 'deserve' better and therefore not focusing on the children and actually teaching the children. This school needs better leadership and to listen to the parents and students needs!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 29, 2010

I have loved Queens Grant from the start. Recently I have concerns, I see complacency with the administration. Test scores and moral seems to be going down. The new grading system does not seem to be working, i have given it the benefit of doubt but I beleive doubt has won out. Teacher turnover in the middle school is high and I fear that the 8th graders are not fully prepared for HS. On a positive note I love the art program. gym class and music programs.The teachers are so dedicated and genuinly care about teaching and making a difference in the students. I think Queens Grant is a wonderful school that is slipping away from excellance. Perhaps a shift in administration would help.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 11, 2010

Queens Grant needs a change in administration. A parent who works and is not volunteering in the school on a daily basis is just overlooked. The principal walks right by without speaking. Favoritism is shown to students whose parent gives alot of time to the school, and that is not always possible for working parents. This school is often compared to a private school, but it is not on par with private schools as far as the administration goes.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2010

My daughter has been at this school for 6 years. We never had a major problem there as far as teachers or admin. until this year. Just never thought the admin. was what is should be. This is my daughters last year there and she has been an excellant student. We recieved a call yesterday AFTER we had dropped her off for school, stating that she had been suspended for the day and we needed to pick her up. No call the day before, no note sent home. The same situation for the other child 's parents that was involved. The student handbook states that there are several steps to go through before "suspension" takes place. This administration DID NOT follow those procedures!!! By the way...my daughter and her best friend were tapping each other in the arm playing and were SUSPENDED - school needs better administration and clearer handbook honestly....
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2010

Queens grant meets all of my expectations. I'm happy with my childs teacher and I love the warm cozy environment the school provides. This charter school provides the things Charlotte Mecklenburg County schools can not, offering an education with heart, and with thousands of people applying for the lottery every year the numbers of the parents trying to get in speak for itself.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 4, 2010

Once again the complainers want everyone to think they are the majority. They are not. Is Queens's Grant perfect? NO. But it is a good school with parents and teachers who care about the children there. My children are learning and doing well at QG and will continue to do so for years to come.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 4, 2010

Current Score Missleading. Look at the date and number of reviews for July 2010. The school sent out an email to selected parents that the rating on GreatSchools was getting low and they asked selected parents to write positive reviews to bring up the rating. (Hence the number of reviews in July 2010). A 'great' school would have sent that email to all parents and let the cards fall. As a 'for profit school' many believe it is Corporate America at work. Quote from letter... (" please write a review on the website I have listed above. Please consider using your name; however you can remain anonymous if you so choose. I can't stress enough how important these postings can be to our school from a marketing stand point.") QG is a good school, Teachers are the best, QG would be 'great' school with better management all round.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 3, 2010

Once again the Public Relations machine at work. This is at least the second time they have tried to influence the ratings. This school needs a leadership change. Instead of avoiding and covering up issues, they need to address the complaints and communicate their plans in writing. Having Board Meetings and Info sessions when most parents cannot attend is unacceptable. The number of half days on the school calendar is ridiculous. Non-traditional school calendar causes extra expenses for parents. Before you signup at this school talk to parents who have pulled their children out, and teachers who have quit.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 22, 2010

I am a both a teacher and a parent at this school. I have worked in many schools and have never worked with a staff that is as dedicated to this profession as the teachers at this school. My children have done well at QG. I have one that does well and one who struggles with academics. This school has met both their needs. There is not a perfect school out there and we don't claim to be one either but we work hard for these kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
87%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
78%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
85%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2011.

135 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
82%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students50%
Female42%
Male59%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White53%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged51%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students50%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English50%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students64%
Female70%
Male59%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students65%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English64%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant64%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students68%
Female62%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Not economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students77%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students60%
Female55%
Male65%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White61%
Economically disadvantaged47%
Not economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students69%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students51%
Female57%
Male43%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White49%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students54%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English51%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant51%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students54%
Female62%
Male43%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White49%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students57%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English54%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant54%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students56%
Female60%
Male51%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students60%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English56%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant56%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students44%
Female46%
Male42%
Black10%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White49%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Not economically disadvantaged45%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students47%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English44%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant44%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students60%
Female59%
Male60%
Black10%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Economically disadvantaged53%
Not economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students64%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students33%
Female35%
Male32%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White37%
Economically disadvantaged-5%
Not economically disadvantaged39%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students38%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English34%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant33%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students62%
Female58%
Male66%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White61%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students70%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English63%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant62%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students43%
Female43%
Male43%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White45%
Economically disadvantaged13%
Not economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students48%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English43%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant43%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students51%
Female51%
Male51%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White55%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students58%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English51%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant51%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students55%
Female46%
Male61%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White55%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Not economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students62%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English55%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant55%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

132 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
64%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

136 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

125 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 82% in 2011.

69 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
80%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 83% in 2012.

142 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
82%
Civics and Economics

The state average for Civics and Economics was 80% in 2011.

138 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
91%
English I

The state average for English I was 83% in 2012.

153 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
88%
Physical Science

The state average for Physical Science was 77% in 2011.

17 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
65%
United States History

The state average for United States History was 82% in 2011.

97 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
91%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students27%
Female30%
Male25%
Black14%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White38%
Economically disadvantaged7%
Not economically disadvantaged30%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students33%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English27%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant27%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Students41%
Female41%
Male41%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White52%
Economically disadvantaged18%
Not economically disadvantaged45%
Students with disabilities10%
Non-disabled students47%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English42%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant41%
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Students58%
Female60%
Male56%
Black44%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Not economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilities14%
Non-disabled students64%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant58%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 68% 52%
Black 20% 26%
Hispanic 6% 14%
Two or more races 4% 4%
Asian 1% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 12%N/A50%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

College readiness and student pathways

Students typically attend these schools prior to attending this school Bain Elem. or Mint Hill Middle
Private or Homeschool
Lebanon Elem. or North East Middle
Read more about resources at this school
Source: Manually entered by a school official.

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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Special education / special needs

Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Autism
  • Multiple disabilities
  • Other health impairments
  • Significant developmental delay
  • Specific learning disabilities
  • Speech and language impairments

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Mathematics

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School start time
  • 8:10 am
School end time
  • 3:10 pm
School Leader's name
  • Dr Mike Smith
Special schedule
  • Block scheduling
  • Extended/longer school day
Fax number
  • (704) 573-0995

Programs

Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Mathematics
Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Autism
  • Multiple disabilities
  • Other health impairments
  • Significant developmental delay
  • Specific learning disabilities
  • Speech and language impairments
Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Resources

Transportation options
  • None
School leaders can update this information here.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross country
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Performing arts
  • Drama
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Uniforms
Parent involvement
  • P.t.i. (parent-student-involvement) school committees parents are sometimes needed for activities in the classroom, lunch supervision, the office, after hours tasks, field-trips, monday mailers, filling, organizing or preparing group activities, volunteer speaker or classroom reader, open houses, new parent mentoring, pti room rep, room mom or dad, fundraising, coaching or assisting with a sports team or club. these are just some of the ways you can get involved at queen's grant.
More from this school
  • Queen's Grant .....Student Creed I am a Queen's Grant student. I strive to achieve academic excellence. I exemplify high moral character. I work diligently to prepare for the future. I value learning. I will be respectful, responsible, and accountable for my actions.
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
 

What are your chances?

Students typically come from these schools
Bain Elem. or Mint Hill Middle
Private or Homeschool
Lebanon Elem. or North East Middle

Planning ahead

Students typically attend these schools after graduating
Queen's Grant Preparatory High School
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

10323 Idlewild Road
Matthews, NC 28105
Website: Click here
Phone: (704) 573-6611

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