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Union Academy Charter School

Charter | K-12 | 1204 students

 
 

Living in Monroe

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $133,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $770.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 5 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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21 reviews of this school


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Posted February 20, 2014

This is our first year at this school and we find the teachers to be very caring, encouraging and quite proficient. My daughter's teachers genuinely love what they do. They incorporate creative ways to entice learning and solicit our input. They curriculum is appropriately challenging and we love their character development initiatives. Every staff member is so friendly and kind(Yes, they've seen me at my worst...) Every parent should feel welcome to the UA environment and experience. Even not-so-sociable parents like us are happy at UA. This school is top notch in ways that goes beyond just the great academics!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 15, 2014

Love love love this school!! The teachers really care about and love their students! I am daily amazed by all that my daughter is learning!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 20, 2013

It has changed so much and definitely not for the better. We will not be returning next year!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2013

I have several children at Union Academy. I am pleased with the education they are receiving, however in light of recent events, the school has proven that they do not have consequences for the children. Unfortunately, this school has proven that it CANNOT "do the right thing even when no one is looking". Good education but sadly lacking in discipline and good morals.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 7, 2013

My School is Union Academy. I have been attending this school since 2nd grade and I am now in 8th. This school is a good school because of what they teach. The only thing that they really need to improve on is the everyday bells because kids get locked out of the school :(. Otherwise this school is great with character, diversity. Plus if your child is struggling with academics they always have tutoring to help them. This is truly a great school


Posted August 10, 2013

My school is union academy monroe nc. The students love their school and the teachers. Love to hear how well the students do their grades and getting into college. The teachers seem to have a closer relationship with the students and help the students learn so they can excel in their natural talents.


Posted March 31, 2013

This is our son's second year at UA. The teachers have done a wonderful job of delivering a well thought-out, challenging curriculum. We have watched this school take his love of learning to the next level. We couldn't be more pleased with the non-institutional atmosphere, it really allows for a relaxed, comfortable learning environment. Mrs. Gandy and her staff are always warm and welcoming. We have enjoyed watching our son grow and thrive at UA.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 2, 2010

2010 is our 5th year at UA. We love the school!! One of our children is in the EC program and we have found it to be much better than the public school! We have not LOVED all the teachers we've had along the way but the majority of them have been wonderful and the ones we didn't love were still OK teachers, they just didn't give us the warm fuzzies thru the school year. Any issues we've had that were potential problems were handled quickly and easily by the teachers/staff. We are blessed and very fortunate to have our kids at UA.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 24, 2010

Great school. Caring teachers. Friendly staff. Well-behaved students. Upcoming sports. Parents are crucial to our success. 5 Stars!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 28, 2009

Union Academy was the best thing that I hav ever done for my kids education. I hate I ever took them out.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 30, 2008

Our children have attended the school for 7 years...and it is a reason to remain, as well as move to the area. Extremely satisfied with all aspects of the experience: from headmasters to after school enrichment programs, curriculum and instructors. Be prepared for
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 13, 2007

A small school with a higher degree in the curiculm. Teachers care about individual student.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 22, 2007

I agree that everybody will not be happy in any situation. UA is a decent school. Where UA is handicapped is the level of comfidience of the staff to be able to communicate with the parents. Not all but in a great deal of issues that I had with my son's teachers, the teachers were reluctant and defensive. That effects some parents views of the school. It is not a bad school but there is nothing wrong with offering constructive advice. I just wish the atmosphere was more welcoming to all parents. You don't have to please everybody but you should at least make all parents feel that you are listening.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 14, 2007

My kids have been at Union Academy since 2000 when the school first started, and I wouldn't have them anywhere else. I think some of the negative reviews are not surprising, since we are a school of choice and will always have some families who weren't happy with their previous school, not happy with our school, and will not be happy with their next school because that is how they choose to view the world. I have learned also that some people confuse 'not getting their way' with 'not being listened to'. UA is awesome, and most people in and out of the school will tell you that. :)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 14, 2007

The school truly has the potential to be a good one. However, unless the Headmaster addresses the issues directly that parents have with the teachers, the students will have trouble reaching their true potential. He is very careful not to upset his staff. I guess it is easier to confront the parents than staff that he sees everyday, I guess. However, I don't know if it is issues of colors for UA. I think it goes deeper. Maybe additional workshops for the teachers would be a good use of their money to better the school. More training in dealing with students that may not look like their world or training in keeping a cool head. Some of their behavior can really make a child feel less than others. Once training is taken and enforced, the school could really progress. Their 2006 scores in math really dropped.
—Submitted by a staff


Posted May 14, 2007

My daughter has been in the school since the first day that the doors opened, and my family has been very happy with the experience. Parents are encouraged to be involved in many ways, and this involvement helps to create a true community spirit. My daughter now knows that her father and I think that education is important because she sees how much time we have invested in the school ourselves. Academically, she is being challenged to rise to her potential and is taking honors and AP courses in high school. Because of the small size, she has had the opportunity to take leadership roles and participate in a variety of after-school activities including athletics. She may not have had some of these opportunities at a larger school. We are proud that she will be in the first class graduating from Union Academy.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 22, 2007

I have had an issue that I brought to the headmaster's attention, and I found genuine concern, assistance and not once did I feel like I was invisible, that my opinion did not count. I have been at the school for 5 years. My 2ndgrader is on a higher reading level than my 3rd grader. I highly recommend UA!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 27, 2006

The headmaster will be friendly at first but once you have an issue to arise with he or his assistant, you are treated differently. There is a great opportunity for good academics if your child is given the opportunity.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2006

My daughters have been at Union Academy for two years now and we think it is a great school. The teachers are unbelievable, the students are great and the parent involvement is outstanding. This school not only teaches academics, but character education also. The students take pride in their school and it shows when you walk through the doors. They are polite, courteous and most of all respectful to each other and their teachers. We love the school and would not want to be anywhere else.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 28, 2006

My first thoughts were that this was a great school. But the more involved that I became the more that I uncovered. The teachers do not follow up as you would think they would and could. Anytime there is conflict, it is like you disappear. If you seek a better education for your child, you may not get it at UA.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

99 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

99 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

99 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

99 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

99 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

98 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

98 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

89 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

89 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
87%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

89 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2011.

82 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
89%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students61%
Female59%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilities20%
Non-disabled students70%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English61%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant61%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students73%
Female71%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged73%
Students with disabilities27%
Non-disabled students82%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English72%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students84%
Female89%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students88%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English84%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant84%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students83%
Female86%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students86%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English83%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant83%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students67%
Female61%
Male73%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilities58%
Non-disabled students68%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English67%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant67%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students65%
Female59%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic30%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged65%
Students with disabilities25%
Non-disabled students70%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English66%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant65%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students77%
Female77%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilities58%
Non-disabled students79%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English78%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant77%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students60%
Female62%
Male57%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged60%
Students with disabilities25%
Non-disabled students64%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students74%
Female76%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilities33%
Non-disabled students79%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English74%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant74%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students61%
Female56%
Male70%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White65%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilities17%
Non-disabled students67%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English61%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant61%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students77%
Female77%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilities58%
Non-disabled students79%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English77%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant77%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students47%
Female59%
Male36%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White49%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students51%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English48%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant47%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students56%
Female77%
Male36%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White58%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students61%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English57%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant56%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students81%
Female86%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students82%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English82%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant81%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

95 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
91%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

108 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

110 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 82% in 2011.

89 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
83%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 83% in 2012.

90 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Civics and Economics

The state average for Civics and Economics was 80% in 2011.

81 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
91%
English I

The state average for English I was 83% in 2012.

113 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Physical Science

The state average for Physical Science was 77% in 2011.

12 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
83%
United States History

The state average for United States History was 82% in 2011.

71 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
93%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students58%
Female62%
Male54%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White62%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students61%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English58%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant58%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Students44%
Female38%
Male51%
Black46%
Asiann/a
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White45%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged44%
Students with disabilities18%
Non-disabled students47%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English44%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant44%
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Students70%
Female74%
Male66%
Black82%
Asiann/a
Hispanic64%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White70%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilities27%
Non-disabled students75%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English70%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant70%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 84% 52%
Black 6% 26%
Hispanic 6% 14%
Asian 2% 3%
Two or more races 1% 4%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

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What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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675 North Ml King Jr Blvd
Monroe, NC 28110
Website: Click here
Phone: (704) 238-8883

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