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Princeton Middle/High

Public | 6-12 | 885 students

 

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Community Rating

4 stars


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9 reviews of this school


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Posted November 10, 2009

We are very proud of princeton high school. If my child is in class or we are at a sporting event as a family we always feel safe. The staff really cares about the children and their education. Our coaches not only teach game rules but good sportsmanship. If all schools in our country were in the hands of phs staff we would see better educated and more well rounded young adults .
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 12, 2008

Princeton is a magnificent school. Since the school is so small it makes us a close knit community. We know almost everyone by name. Growing up with the same kids helps form lifelong friendships. I know I keep in touch with mine. It's a great place to consider if you want your child in a great community.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 13, 2008

I love Princeton High School. We have such nice people. And you don't hear about that many fights that happen here. But besides that we are a pretty nice school. If your thinking about entering the princeton area you may want to check in on the school. We have some pretty nice teachers too. Overall I would give my school a excellent star!
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 12, 2007

It was an absolute joy to attend Princeton High School. Unlike most schools that have large numbers of students, Princeton had a more personable feel. When you were their you didnt feel like a number, everyone knows everyone and treats them like family. I spent 13 years of my life with a special group of people, the class of 2007. We were like brothers and sisters, encouraging one another along and working through any problems we might have had together. The faculty were very helpful and easy to get along with. My favorite staff member would have to be the Biology teacher at Princeton High School. Mr. Greg Godwin always seemed to have time and went the extra mile for anyone in need. I would definitely send my children because I know that they would get a proper education at Princeton High School
—Submitted by a former student


Posted January 26, 2007

I had two daughters graduate from Princeton High School, having entered the school in 8th and 10th grades. We moved from Florida, so the experience of leaving their friends made it less than ideal for them. They quickly found new friends and got along fine. I especially appreciated that they assigned another student to show my older daughter around the high school and help her find her classes. They've become life-long friends. I attended PHS myself and had a pretty good experience.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted September 14, 2006

As an alumni of Princeton High School I wish I still lived in North Carolina. If I did my children would deffinitely go to school there. You got a lot of one on one time with the teachers and they genuinely cared whether you passed or failed.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted August 16, 2005

Being a former student at Princeton, I can honestly say that if i had children, I wouldnt send them anywhere but Princeton. I wouldnt trade my experiences there for anything. Being one of the only k-12 schools left, Princeton is truly unique. Princeton is like a community in itself, and it challenges you acdemically daily. -Tara Smith
—Submitted by a former student


Posted August 2, 2005

This school has not met the expectations that I had when I first moved into the area. This school is very large and unless you have a child that is able to handle a very large class with absolutely no help from any of the staff, they would be best off going to either a different school in the district, or if possible, a private school who is more willing to involve the parents in their childrens' progress.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 20, 2005

I have 2 children in primary grades...Both are thriving and enjoying being at Princeton. Being a Princeton alumnus myself, I know first hand how important it is to be involved in a community school. Everyone knows everyone and pays particular attention to how each child is treated by the staff. The curriculum seems to be a little better than the average primary grades in other schools. Values and compassion for one's classmates are among the priorities taught at Princeton. The end of grade testing seems to speak for the caliber of Princeton's teachers and the dedication to each child's personal success. Extracurricular activites are available to each child, regardless of age or financial level. I think the best part of Princeton is how the whole community is involved with each family and especially, each child. I never feel like a stranger.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

139 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

139 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

135 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

135 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

142 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

142 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
83%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

142 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 56% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 64% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2012.

2012

 
 
n/a
Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2011.

113 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
58%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students37%
Female33%
Male41%
Black24%
Asiann/a
Hispanic47%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White40%
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilities13%
Non-disabled students44%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English39%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant37%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students45%
Female44%
Male46%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanic27%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White53%
Economically disadvantaged37%
Not economically disadvantaged59%
Students with disabilities16%
Non-disabled students54%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English47%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant45%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students40%
Female43%
Male37%
Black25%
Asiann/a
Hispanic38%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White43%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Not economically disadvantaged48%
Students with disabilities11%
Non-disabled students50%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English42%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant40%
Academically gifted93%

Reading

All Students49%
Female54%
Male44%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanic42%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White53%
Economically disadvantaged44%
Not economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilities6%
Non-disabled students64%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English52%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant49%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students37%
Female45%
Male30%
Black29%
Asiann/a
Hispanic24%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White42%
Economically disadvantaged24%
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students46%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English38%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant37%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students42%
Female49%
Male34%
Black36%
Asiann/a
Hispanic29%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White46%
Economically disadvantaged26%
Not economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilities13%
Non-disabled students49%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English43%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant42%
Academically gifted94%

Science

All Students81%
Female86%
Male77%
Black64%
Asiann/a
Hispanic71%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Economically disadvantaged73%
Not economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilities53%
Non-disabled students88%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English82%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant81%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
89%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

118 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

114 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 82% in 2011.

66 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 83% in 2012.

124 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
83%
Civics and Economics

The state average for Civics and Economics was 80% in 2011.

109 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
89%
English I

The state average for English I was 83% in 2012.

109 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
88%
Physical Science

The state average for Physical Science was 77% in 2011.

74 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
95%
United States History

The state average for United States History was 82% in 2011.

98 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
89%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students29%
Female31%
Male28%
Black11%
Asiann/a
Hispanic23%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White34%
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantaged35%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students38%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English30%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant29%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Students50%
Female54%
Male46%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanic46%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White52%
Economically disadvantaged35%
Not economically disadvantaged59%
Students with disabilities18%
Non-disabled students57%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English51%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Academically gifted92%

English II

All Students60%
Female68%
Male52%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilities15%
Non-disabled students69%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English61%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically gifted93%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 75% 52%
Hispanic 12% 14%
Black 11% 26%
Two or more races 2% 4%
Asian 1% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 44%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
PE instructor(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Performance stage
Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr W Kirk Denning
Associations
  • SACS
Fax number
  • (919) 936-2962

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Art room
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Performance stage
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Track
  • Wrestling
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross country
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Join PTO/PTA
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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101 Doctor Donnie H Jones Junior Boulevard West
Princeton, NC 27569
Website: Click here
Phone: (919) 936-5011

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