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Daniels Middle

Public | 6-8 | 1186 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

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15 reviews of this school


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Posted April 11, 2012

I am very disappointed with my son's first year in Middle School at Daniels! I have always been a very involved parent since my kids started school. When I first walked into the front office at Daniels it was so cold and the front office person was not friendly at all. I understand that in 6th grade the staff expect the students to be more mature and independent, but there is almost no contact with the teachers unless you initiate it. I emailed my son's team leader about scheduling a conference and it took almost a month to get it set-up. I can honestly say that I am not at all thrilled with this school so far this year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 13, 2011

This school is a ITB, clicky school, and huge so for someone that needs a smaller community and surrounding i do not reccommend this school but overall, the teachers are okay, could be a little more challenging, the electives are great along with sports, but the surrounding of people is definately not the best..


Posted June 24, 2011

I have had two children at Daniels, which is best characterized as an elite, inside the Beltline neighborhood school. (It is no longer a magnet.) We transferred in at 7th grade and found the school to be superior to our other magnet choice. Our child was challenged academically and given support when struggling or challenged to take more advanced classes without our having to ask. Classrooms are orderly. Problem students tend to be removed from class so learning can continue. Quite a few male teachers here, rare these days. Teaching expertise varies here as anywhere. Our second child has had engaged teachers with high expectations and at least one who gave credit for merely turning in homework regardless of accuracy. Counselors have been accessible and excellent, although I can say that transitional counseling to high school is heavily weighted toward Broughton, for which Daniels is a feeder school. Overall, Daniels is a superior learning community. An involved parent can advocate for their child and get results. Extracurricular activities (sports, fine arts presentations, student recognition programs are high quality. Your experience here will be what you make it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 4, 2011

My child attended this school for sixth and part of seventh grade. The low academic expectations, poor administrative leadership, and lack of respect adults showed children of all backgrounds was very disappointing. We have since moved schools and the curriculum is a good year ahead of what Daniels offered (despite my child being in the top academic courses at DMS). We are surprised that an Inside the Beltline school demonstrates only mediocrity at best.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2010

Great adminsitration, excellent teachers, overall good functioning school for many years.


Posted March 9, 2010

We moved here from NYC. My oldest daughter was entering middle school and we found Daniels. This has been a really positive experience overall. My daughter made friends easily and continues to build friendships at Daniels. The teachers provide ample means for communication and offer help when needed. Some of the classes could be a bit more challenging, but I have enjoyed watching my daughter really put effort into her work at Daniels. My youngest daughter is looking forward to being there next year!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 14, 2009

I love this school my time here could not have been any better I will be sad when I have to leave.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 11, 2009

I love this school. I have made great friends with the kids and the teachers. I love it, everyone is nice and no one will leave you behind.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 24, 2009

This is the last yr in middle school for my oldest child. We have loved Daniels. It has been the most positive experience a parent could hope for. We lost our magnet status last year and then we were redistricted as well. We will be relocating to a node which falls under Daniels when my others arrive at middle school level. Dr. Battle and staff are the best you could ask for!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 28, 2009

It's such a wonderful school. I lovE it there. The teachers there are excellent.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted March 23, 2006

My child has been very happy at Daniels Middle School. School to parent communication has improved tremendously this year thanks, in part, to a very competent PTA board. Discipline problems have been dealt with promptly. PTA attendance is low, but that is usually a sign that everyone is happy. Issues still to work on: technology use, including better design and use of the school website, and challenging gifted students academically.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 1, 2006

My child had really enjoyed middle school. Daniels has a great group of caring and highly educated teachers. This year there is a new principal who is very good for the school! Parent school communication has increased- a big help!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 3, 2006

The parents here are highly involved with their childrens education and dedication to the school. They spend a lot of time making sure their children have the best possible education facility they can get. The availability of arts and sports is just amazing. Daniels is well known for having great athletic teams. Anything you want to do outside of school, is availabile. All of the teachers there are very high educatated people and take pride in their students and love to teach. As a student for 2 years, I have witnessed all of this first hand, this is a great school and if you are wondering about what it is like, just call them, they will lend a helping hand anytime! GO BLUE JACKETS!
—Submitted by a former student


Posted September 17, 2005

Daniels was a nice school. I was a student so I know first hand. When I was first there everyone greeted me and help me around the very large school. Teachers would stay after school for a long time to help. Even at 6:00am there would be teachers there. All work was easy and teachers helped me a lot. I only been at that school for 1 year and the whole time there were no fights and if you were a problem they would handle you before anything got out of hand. I was there during the gas leak and one was hurt and they did a good job making sure we were safe. I loved that school very much, I recently moved out of the state, but I wish I could go back just to be at that school. Daniels was great! In fact I love all of raleigh schools!
—Submitted by a former student


Posted June 27, 2004

Students have a good time at Daniels. Parents focus more on athletics (team uniforms, condition of the football stadium, basketball court) than on the academic program, condition and of computers, science labs, test scores, etc. Attendance at PTA Board meetings is shockingly low. Parents are very adept and successful at fundraising - a wealthy PTA. Communication from the principal's office, (especially 2-way communication) and from school to home is very poor, and often last minute. Daniels was recently designated an IB magnet. My students/children enjoyed their 3 years at Daniels, but they were not challenged academically.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

400 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
85%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

400 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

379 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

379 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
72%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

392 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
83%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

392 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
78%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

393 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students50%
Female52%
Male48%
Black21%
Asiann/a
Hispanic30%
Multiracial50%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Economically disadvantaged24%
Not economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilities18%
Non-disabled students55%
Limited English proficiency6%
Proficient in English54%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students54%
Female58%
Male51%
Black29%
Asiann/a
Hispanic26%
Multiracial64%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilities15%
Non-disabled students61%
Limited English proficiency6%
Proficient in English58%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant54%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students46%
Female49%
Male42%
Black20%
Asian46%
Hispanic33%
Multiracial29%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Economically disadvantaged23%
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilities11%
Non-disabled students55%
Limited English proficiency17%
Proficient in English48%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant46%
Academically gifted93%

Reading

All Students53%
Female56%
Male50%
Black30%
Asian36%
Hispanic27%
Multiracial41%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilities20%
Non-disabled students61%
Limited English proficiency9%
Proficient in English55%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant53%
Academically gifted94%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students35%
Female34%
Male36%
Black7%
Asiann/a
Hispanic14%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Economically disadvantaged12%
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilities7%
Non-disabled students43%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English37%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant35%
Academically gifted80%

Reading

All Students43%
Female47%
Male40%
Black17%
Asiann/a
Hispanic12%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Economically disadvantaged16%
Not economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilities16%
Non-disabled students51%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English46%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant43%
Academically gifted86%

Science

All Students67%
Female66%
Male67%
Black42%
Asiann/a
Hispanic42%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Economically disadvantaged41%
Not economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilities37%
Non-disabled students75%
Limited English proficiency14%
Proficient in English70%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant67%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

221 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students65%
Female61%
Male69%
Black25%
Asiann/a
Hispanic47%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Economically disadvantaged45%
Not economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilities50%
Non-disabled students66%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English65%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant65%
Academically gifted90%

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 47% 52%
Black 34% 26%
Hispanic 14% 14%
Two or more races 3% 4%
Asian 2% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 45%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Assistant principal(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Ms Elizabeth Battle
Fax number
  • (919) 881-1418

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Assistant principal(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Cafeteria
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
Girls sports
  • Basketball

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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2816 Oberlin Road
Raleigh, NC 27608
Website: Click here
Phone: (919) 881-4860

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