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GreatSchools Rating

Moore Square Museum Magnet Middle

Public | 6-8 | 516 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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15 reviews of this school


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Posted March 23, 2014

Thoroughly pleased with our exprience so far. Ms Mandora is engaging and Ms Noa is one point 105% of the time. More importantly, most of the teachers have been great. I'm thankful!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 12, 2014

My daughter is a sixth grader and her experience has been exceptional at MSMS. Dr. Bass and Mrs. Mondora are great leaders. Her teachers on the whole have been great to work with and she loves going to school almost everyday! I highly recommend this school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 11, 2014

HIDDEN GEM! My son transferred to the Square in seventh grade from out of state. I have not enough words to describe the impact his time at the Square has had on him. The administrators, staff, & teachers are exceptional. My son has evolved from a shy, quiet follower to a confident, caring leader. The staff know him by name and address him with kindness & respect. This year the magnet theme has changed to GT/AG. The opportunities are endless. As for academic, his testing speaks for itself. He scored 4 on all 7th grade EOGs. On the ACT explore testing 99% of the kids in the US who took the test scored below him. Thank you Moore Square!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 6, 2013

I have a son that attended this school from 2009-2012. He claims he did NOT like any of the teachers, they were overall horrible & disrespectful to the students. He pointed out various instances where the teachers would make students cry or run out of the classroom due to feeling so humiliated. My son is a very quiet well behaved child so he says he sat in disbelief & in shock compared to how he was raised & with how the staff had little to no control over their students. Now he's at Sanderson High School, doing very well & extremely happy. My son kept A LOT about this school quiet from me until now, where he has experienced more, become out spoken & experienced better schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 8, 2013

This has been a great 3 weeks, after transitiating from elementary!! Glad we chose the Square!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 8, 2013

My son was at M2M3 last year. He was extremely sad to leave this school. He had great teachers and made good friends. He had all the support he needed to be sucessful and is now taking all honor classes in high school. My daughter is an AG student. She has thrived at Moore Square. The location is great. The staff is supportive. I recommend this school very highly.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 8, 2013

This is our second year at Moore Square and we LOVE THIS SCHOOL!!! I love having our son in a smaller middle school, as it has helped his adjustment to middle school so much. The staff learn the students so quickly, and they are so accessible to the parents. Can't wait to send our second child here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 20, 2011

I strongly disagree with the negative comments made about the school as a whole. After conducting a two-year search for the best-fit school for my son to attend I was thrilled when he was selected to attend Moore Square. Coming from a very poorly run elementray school I consider the responsive staff (both teachers and administrators) a blessing. My son is in his first year and loves it, he is enthused about the assignments, outings and activities. Additionally, I find the weekly telephone messages from the principal invaluable. Speaking as the parent of a high functioning autistic I couldn't ask for a more supportive and encouraging environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 3, 2010

Staff is great, they offer a supportive and challenging environment for the kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 30, 2010

hands on; teachers are great; not alot of homework so we can have more family time which i feel is very important
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 5, 2010

2009-2010 has been my girls first year at M2M3. And I am sad to say that i have been very disappointed with the school, students and staff. They will not return ever!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 5, 2009

As one of the many 'former' teachers of the Moore Square experience I would highly recommend anyone who is considering placing their child in this school to visit it first. And please visit it while school is in session. Notice the class changes and lunchroom atmosphere. I was there for many grueling years and it never got any less painful to walk through those doors each morning. It was a very hostile learning environment to say the least. The teachers were great. Unfortunately they were not treated with much respect. Administration was present at best but not effective nor supportive. I saw many parents remove their kids throughout my years there and I never once blamed them. Do your homework on this school before you sign up. You'll thank yourself.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted December 5, 2006

This is our third & final year at Moore Square. Our student has done well academically. The school has good points: dedicated, National Board Certified professional teachers who challenge students; afterschool clubs such as Strings,Drama and Beta club. Intramural sports, too. That said, the school has real problems. Many daily influences are bad. Our student's siblings will not enroll here. Core problems, I believe, are related to the troubled home lives of the school's base population, which bleed into the school. Discipline and behavior have been continual problems since Day No. 1. When accessible, administration is unresponsive. Conversation doesn't bring positive change. PTA hasn't helped. School is beautiful, great location. But bricks don't make great schools. Meaningful changes need to happen in order for Moore Square to realize its promise and remain a magnet school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 29, 2005

Im sorry but i beg to differ with the recent comment, this is an actual student from Moore Square, you want to know the real truth about this school? it is corrupt and the teachers cant take care of the students, they are disrespectful towards the staff and the students. This school may look nice on the outside but in the inside its bad, dont judge a book by its cover. sure the after-school activities are fine, but is it really worth all the bad influence? and I've had many racist comments said towards me and I'm tired of all the bad things going on.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 3, 2005

My child is in their third year at this school, loves it, and is a straight A student. Liaison with museums, government offices and businesses in the school's downtown neighborhood is highly enriching.I have heard mixed views about teacher quality; all of my child's teachers have been good, some have been truly outstanding. Drama program and after-school drama club has been very important to my child; they performed a highly original work this winter, written by the teacher and developed through improvisation by the students; it was very entertaining and thought-provoking; impressive. I have witnessed some 'non-compliance' by students, and consider teacher-applied discipline too lax on a couple of occasions; however, I cannot say if the behaviour I saw was general, or a result of occasional high spirits. Counselling team is responsive,sensitive, very professional. Facility is absolutely beautiful. No inter-school sports, (not a requirement for us, but essential for some).
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

174 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
14%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
69%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

174 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
65%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

162 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
66%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

162 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
53%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

183 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
60%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

182 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
50%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

183 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
60%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students14%
Female17%
Male12%
Black-5%
Asiann/a
Hispanic10%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White34%
Economically disadvantaged-5%
Not economically disadvantaged30%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students19%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English15%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant14%
Academically gifted69%

Reading

All Students37%
Female39%
Male35%
Black18%
Asiann/a
Hispanic26%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Economically disadvantaged19%
Not economically disadvantaged65%
Students with disabilities10%
Non-disabled students46%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English38%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant37%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students20%
Female23%
Male17%
Black11%
Asiann/a
Hispanic19%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White44%
Economically disadvantaged11%
Not economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students26%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English22%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant20%
Academically gifted74%

Reading

All Students35%
Female41%
Male29%
Black25%
Asiann/a
Hispanic27%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White68%
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilities11%
Non-disabled students42%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English38%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant35%
Academically gifted74%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students28%
Female25%
Male32%
Black10%
Asiann/a
Hispanic39%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White61%
Economically disadvantaged13%
Not economically disadvantaged46%
Students with disabilities13%
Non-disabled students32%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English29%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant28%
Academically gifted76%

Reading

All Students37%
Female37%
Male36%
Black25%
Asiann/a
Hispanic31%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Economically disadvantaged24%
Not economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilities13%
Non-disabled students43%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English39%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant37%
Academically gifted79%

Science

All Students59%
Female56%
Male61%
Black41%
Asiann/a
Hispanic69%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White88%
Economically disadvantaged44%
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilities33%
Non-disabled students66%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant59%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

91 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students43%
Female47%
Male39%
Black36%
Asiann/a
Hispanic31%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White60%
Economically disadvantaged35%
Not economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students43%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English43%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant43%
Academically gifted52%

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 54% 26%
White 25% 52%
Hispanic 17% 14%
Two or more races 3% 4%
Asian 1% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 62%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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301 South Person Street
Raleigh, NC 27601
Website: Click here
Phone: (919) 664-5737

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