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Endeavor Charter

Charter | K-8 | 474 students

 

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Living in Raleigh

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $213,600. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $870.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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12 reviews of this school


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Posted December 17, 2013

We have been at Endeavor for 3 years - 2 children at Endeavor now and our oldest is an alumna who was well prepared for high school. Our teachers have been fantastic! The children were very welcoming to our oldest when she entered in 8th grade. It was a HUGE improvement in learning environment for her - expectations were set high and she rose to meet them. The staff and administration know all of the kids by name and each child is greeted personally when they arrive each morning by admin team members holding the doors open for the kids. Parent involvement is high (I served a term on PAWS - their PTA) and a large percentage of parents help regularly by volunteering for lunch duty, field trip transportation and other things. The board is in process of building a $19MM permanent school facility off of Burlington Mills at Capital Blvd in Wake a Forest - about 13 minutes NW of the current Forum Drive location. The school will move to its new home for the 2014 - 2015 school year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2013

This school has made a world of difference for my 3 boys. One is gifted and was only taught to his abilities when he got a seat at Endeavor. He is now in high school, and ECS clearly has been an advantage. Another son has learning difficulties, but isn't hyper, so he was also "warehoused" at the public schools he attended. The faculty goes out of their way to help him succeed. My youngest seems to be ahead of the class in some areas and behind in others. The small class sizes allow his teachers to accommodate his needs, as well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 17, 2013

I am a former teacher at Endeavor and as several previous reviewers have noted that if your child is not among the financially privileged and connected families, they just aren't treated the same. I saw this with my own eyes. The administration is very weak and is scared to death of certain parents and board members.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted November 4, 2012

Both of my children attend at ECS. As both an educator and parent I commend the school for its hands-on-learning, public speaking opportunities and social stewardship. However there is bullying taking place and the administration does little to circumvent it. If you have money your "in" and your child's poor behavior is overlooked other students suffer because of it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 27, 2012

This school has a lot of great qualities, BUT if you have a child that is a bit "different" beware! This school is full of economically-privileged, North Raleigh families. Children who are not into sports or the latest cool consumer trend are openly ostracized. The administration does very little to try and deal with these problems. My child developed anxiety problems from the social and academic stress imposed by this school. I know there are others who have endured this as well. Teachers are for the most part very caring but there seems to be some rigidity imposed by administration that has resulted in a high teacher turnover. If your child is well-adjusted and deals with social pressure well, this school is fine. But if not, be ready for many tearful nights-the small class size makes the teasing all the more ruthless and hard to take. My child is attending a regular public school in Raleigh now and is thriving.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 20, 2011

Great School. We have been very happy at Endeavor. It feels like a community and my son feels very at home there. They have challenging academics, smaller class sizes, caring and committed teachers, and plenty of parental support and involvment. In addition, they foster a hands-on learning approach and offer a lot of unique curriculum based fields trips which allow the students to learn the curriculum at a deeper level. We feel very blessed to be a part of such an amazing school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 1, 2010

I have three children at Endeavor and feel very blessed to have had the opportunity for them to attend this incredible school. The teachers are warm and truly do care about each child. The administration is very open and always has a door open policy and is involved with every student and parent. This school has excellent teachers, a strong principal and an academic program like no other.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 10, 2009

Extremely healthy school environment, teachers & administration very involved in supervision and making sure kids treat each other with respect, zero tolerance for bullying. Kids are accepting of all kinds of differences. Academically, some teachers are willing to assess student's individual needs & provide appropriate challenge and/or remediation. Teachers communicate & update assignments online. I'm happy with the school overall.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 5, 2009

We couldn't be happier at Endeavor! Fantastic teachers, active parents and small class size set this school apart from most in the area. We honestly feel like we have won the lottery by our kids getting in! My kids love to go to school and it is amazing to see how eager they are to learn with the 'hands on' currculm. Very safe and nuturing academic environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 21, 2009

very poor academics and no supervision.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 15, 2009

My son just finished 2nd grade at Endeavor. I am very pleased with the curriculum of Endeavor and how is surpasses other schools in the area. The small class sizes are wonderful. The PTA is very involved the staff is very friendly and helpful.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 9, 2009

We feel very blessed to have been able to get into Endeavor. We have a 7th grader, 2nd grader, and an upcoming Kindergartener coming this July. We feel the academic emphasis and overall philosophy is what separates Endeavor from other schools. They have small class sizes so the teacher can actually teach. It is very much a family atmosphere and we feel confident leaving our children in such capable hands. The teachers are very didicatedandthe parent involement is outstanding. The teachers have to turn help down sometimes which isn't a bad thing. Endeavor has not even been open for 1 year, yet runs as it were open for 10!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
>95%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students70%
Female63%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students75%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English70%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant70%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students71%
Female67%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students75%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English71%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant71%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students75%
Female71%
Male78%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students77%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English75%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant75%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students77%
Female-95%
Male63%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students80%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English77%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant77%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students95%
Female-95%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students-95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant95%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students68%
Female63%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students68%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students80%
Female74%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students82%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English80%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant80%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students79%
Female86%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students86%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English79%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant79%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students84%
Female-95%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students90%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English84%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant84%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students60%
Female52%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White59%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged59%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students67%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students80%
Female84%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students84%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English80%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant80%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students60%
Female66%
Male54%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged62%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students64%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students74%
Female83%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students77%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English74%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant74%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students88%
Female90%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White87%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students91%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English88%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant88%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students76%
Female77%
Male75%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students78%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English76%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant76%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 91% 52%
Two or more races 3% 4%
Asian 2% 3%
Hispanic 2% 14%
Black 1% 26%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students College counselor(s)
Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Reading specialist(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Computer lab

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
Performing and written arts
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Video / Film production

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Mr Stephen McAdams
Fax number
  • (919) 848-8716

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • College counselor(s)
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Reading specialist(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Computer lab
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Diving
  • Soccer

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
Performing arts
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Video / Film production
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

School culture

Parent involvement
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Join PTO/PTA
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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9400 Forum Drive
Raleigh, NC 27615
Website: Click here
Phone: (919) 848-0333

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