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Rocky Mount Preparatory School, Inc.

Charter | K-12 | 1126 students

 

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Living in Rocky Mount

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $115,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $660.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 6 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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17 reviews of this school


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Posted October 22, 2013

I think that the E2020 program should've been tested more before bringing it to Prep. There always seems to be computer issues and leaves the students with not being able to complete their assignments. I think that there needs to be another alternative to learning when the computers are not functioning properly.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 13, 2013

In the High School - an experiment gone awry - too many unfulfilled promises, too few teachers, and a total lack of leadership. The blended learning environment treated students as guinea pigs and teachers as expendable; in my eyes as a parent it was a massive failure.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 17, 2013

This school is horrible dont come here even if it is your last option homeschool the kids.


Posted May 16, 2013

My school is (Rocky Mount Prep) and it has to be the worst school in the history of education. I'm a junior here and I already know for sure I'm going to be in summer school for at least 2 classes. The blended learning program has been the worst idea ever thought up. If it wasn't for the athletics and the way my credits are I wouldn't be here. To be honest with you, jail is better than coming here. I advise everyone to never even think about attending this school. -I am a student


Posted May 16, 2013

My school is Rocky Mount Prep and it is falling apart. Teachers are not being respected in class rooms, Lab is loud and uncontrolled and academics are not cared for. I believe they should have tested Blended Learning on a smaller group of people before they made everyone follow it. Then they would have been able to seek the kinks of it. Students don't care about doing work on the computer. The only reason the computer used is to unblock sites, so they can get on Facebook and twitter. Then everyone is rushing at the end of the year to finish their courses. You also have teachers who have not been to school in weeks and students need their help. Everyone can't learn on a computer. How can you add math online and not have an explanation for it. Right now I would not recommend that students send their children here just yet.


Posted April 24, 2013

I would not recommend Rocky Mount Preparatory School to any parent. My 2 children currently attend this school. On 4/22/13, my son mentioned that the computer lab instructor had the high school students line up and gave them 3 options. They haven't had an Algebra teacher for part of the school year. They were told to decide whether they would keep the course, take it in summer school, or take it next year. I still haven't received any notification from the school. When do they plan on notifying the parents? Are you telling me that 85% to 90% of the high school class will be in summer school because the school has failed to teach the students? Since when children have the authority to make these forms of decisions. My child will not make that decision. This is my decision to make as a parent. The couple of high school teachers that still remain do not help the children succeed and do not help them understand the course work. The high school students sit in front of computers all day long, every day. This is definitely not an effective way of learning. I am greatly disappointed with the direction this school has taken and this E2020 program.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 18, 2012

I think that the school is a great all-around school, with a great education system. Now that they have the new head-master their doing a new learning program called "Blended learning.". The school is really trying to pull it out and I think that they are doing an awesome job!


Posted June 28, 2010

RMPS has some very fine educators, but these are far and few between. The hiring and retaining of incompetent and unqualified staff is frustrating and highly reflective in the declining test scores and high rate of staff and student turn around. We felt that there was a very poor moral amongst the staff and the headmaster seamed oblivious to this. On many occasions he seemed out of touch and arrogant. Our children no longer attend RMPS and for many sound reasons.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 28, 2010

RMPS is currently under Title I sanctions and in the restructuring process for consistently having low test scores. The headmaster did not notify the parents or teachers of this and kept this information hidden until he could no longer do so. The school climate is unhealthy because of the fear that the headmaster's actions create.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted April 28, 2010

The elementary school is very nurturing and supportive. We moved our 1st grader to the prep school after he had difficulty at a school that is considered one of the best in the region. The prep school has been a much better fit. The teachers are hardworking and caring. My son has had an excellent year and he looks forward to school again.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 14, 2010

Staff is top-notch; the school is safe, and effort is made to ensure all kids are treated equally!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted May 30, 2008

I am a member of the first graduating class of RMPS, currently a senior at UNC Greensboro. My time at Rocky Mount Prep was not without its rough times but the overall atmosphere was great. I always had great teacher interaction with personalized help. I am still in touch with many of my former teachers. While the high school lacked extra-curriculars that other schools had, there were other things to do. I was involved in the yearbook and newspaper clubs, as well as a part-time job off of campus. However, the best thing RMPS did for me was to allow me the chance to take college courses through Nash Comm. College my junior and senior years. Because of that help, I am graduating early this December. It is possible to finish college in four years, especially with help from your high school.


Posted February 26, 2007

This school system have provided the education process for my great-granddaughter to get off to a great start. She was ready for the learning process and this was the only system to provide her that opportunity to start. She was ready after being in the childcare system since six weeks old until age three years. It was at that age she returned home for sixteen months and her skills were re-enforced daily with computer enforcement of learning software for her age. She have been an honor student from day one and should continue with parental involvement along with her teachers instructions. Keep up the good work. I am blessed that the students are uniformed since we are on a fixed income. Being a retired great-grandparent, it makes life more affortable for both of us.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 13, 2006

There is NO other tuition-free school anywhere in the tri-county area that I would even consider enrolling my kids. I especially appreciate the discipline and uniform policies. It is a school where the parents are EXPECTED to assist with their children's learning. The school focuses more on learning than on the extra curricular activities that are so common in many public schools. The staff have been especially helpful with my children's unique health and learning issues. No school is perfect but this is a good school from kindergarten through graduation.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 26, 2004

This school has provided everything I wanted for my daughter's education. The staff has been supportive and the direct instruction seems to be working well. My only negative would be computers & foreign language in elementary school. So far there has been very little exposure.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 29, 2004

I think Rocky Mount Prep is a great school. If you're unsure about the public schools in the Edgecombe/Nash school districts, then I would seriously consider sending your child to this school. This school is K-11, and will soon be through 12. They do a great job of keeping older kids and younger ones seperated by having seperate buildings for the different age groups. I feel that the safety of the school is also very good.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 17, 2003

I have 2 children already attending and 1 more starting next year. I would recommend the school to any parents looking for a good education at a great school.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

84 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
67%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

92 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
15%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
85%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

92 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
67%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
85%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
6%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
23%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
65%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
22%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
74%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
62%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2011.

54 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
70%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students19%
Female17%
Male21%
Black14%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White30%
Economically disadvantaged16%
Not economically disadvantaged24%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students20%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English20%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant19%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students35%
Female26%
Male43%
Black20%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White65%
Economically disadvantaged24%
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students34%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English35%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant35%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students15%
Female9%
Male22%
Black9%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White30%
Economically disadvantaged11%
Not economically disadvantaged38%
Students with disabilities29%
Non-disabled students13%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English16%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant15%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students32%
Female33%
Male30%
Black19%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White53%
Economically disadvantaged26%
Not economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilities14%
Non-disabled students35%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English32%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant32%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students20%
Female21%
Male18%
Black17%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White29%
Economically disadvantaged16%
Not economically disadvantaged32%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students21%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English20%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant20%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students31%
Female33%
Male30%
Black31%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White29%
Economically disadvantaged25%
Not economically disadvantaged48%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students31%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English31%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant31%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students6%
Female-5%
Male9%
Black7%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White7%
Economically disadvantaged-5%
Not economically disadvantaged16%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students7%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English6%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant6%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students31%
Female33%
Male29%
Black18%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White43%
Economically disadvantaged19%
Not economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students36%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English32%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant31%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students43%
Female44%
Male42%
Black32%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White58%
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilities13%
Non-disabled students47%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English43%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant43%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students23%
Female30%
Male19%
Black20%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White28%
Economically disadvantaged17%
Not economically disadvantaged34%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students28%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English23%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant23%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students37%
Female49%
Male29%
Black30%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White41%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Not economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilities11%
Non-disabled students42%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English37%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant37%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students22%
Female19%
Male25%
Black17%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White26%
Economically disadvantaged23%
Not economically disadvantaged22%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students25%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English23%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant22%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students43%
Female60%
Male32%
Black34%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White48%
Economically disadvantaged37%
Not economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilities10%
Non-disabled students46%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English44%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant43%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students60%
Female60%
Male60%
Black49%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Economically disadvantaged58%
Not economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilities50%
Non-disabled students61%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

108 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
16%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
81%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
8%
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 82% in 2011.

57 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
86%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 83% in 2012.

52 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
67%
Civics and Economics

The state average for Civics and Economics was 80% in 2011.

35 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
66%
English I

The state average for English I was 83% in 2012.

76 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
86%
Physical Science

The state average for Physical Science was 77% in 2011.

25 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
92%
United States History

The state average for United States History was 82% in 2011.

58 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
60%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students16%
Female13%
Male18%
Black15%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White19%
Economically disadvantaged15%
Not economically disadvantaged17%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students18%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English16%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant16%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Students8%
Female-5%
Male12%
Black-5%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged-5%
Not economically disadvantaged23%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students9%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English8%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant8%
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Students29%
Female32%
Male28%
Black28%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White35%
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantaged32%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students35%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English29%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant29%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 60% 26%
White 28% 52%
American Indian 4% 1%
Hispanic 4% 14%
Two or more races 3% 4%
Asian 1% 3%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 44%N/A50%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Aaron Douglas Haynes
Fax number
  • (252) 443-9932

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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3334 Bishop Road
Rocky Mount, NC 27804
Website: Click here
Phone: (252) 443-9923

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