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Uwharrie Middle

Public | 6-8 | 417 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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6 reviews of this school


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Posted March 30, 2013

I have been teaching at UMS since 2006, and I must say that it is as close to a private school as a public school can get. We are small (approximately 408 students) and have a wonderful, hard working staff. We are known as the "Disneyland" of all the middle schools in Randolph County, due to having no major behavior problems among our students. We are not perfect, but we work hard to put our students' needs first. Community and parental support is tops. Contrary to a parent's post on here, we do not access Facebook while at work, nor do students curse at us! For one thing, social networking sites are blocked at school, and there is zero tolerance for students using profanity toward their teachers or classmates. If I had a child in middle school, UMS is the only school in RC I would want him/her to attend! I plan to teach there for many years to come.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted January 10, 2012

this school have problems just like any other schools. If u have a problem with something talk it out or go to boarder of education. Parents if u dont speak up or stand up for your kids who else is going to do it . I talked to the Principals and teachers. I spend the time in the class room. I got involved and not everything is a 100 % great but, its getting better for my son and I. I dont care what they think of me, I am not trying to get popularity I am looking out for my kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 28, 2011

Uwharrie Middle School in Randolph County is not a school I would recommend. I pulled my child out of that school, because I went to visit the classrooms and was completely disgusted by what I witnessed. Students were cursing at teachers, some teachers were not even present in the classrooms during class time, and other teachers were on Facebook during the time that they should have been teaching. I went to pick my child up one day and the office staff told me he was absent, and I had to go hunt him down myself (he was in the gym for an assembly). Extreme favoritism is shown by what few teachers get to know their students. I would not recommend UMS to anybody that cares about the education of their child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 26, 2005

Uwarrie is a great school. My child moved there in the seventh grade and has had a wonderful experience. The teachers are the tops. My only concern is some parents whine too often in order to get their way.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 9, 2005

Overall good school, however bus control can be a problem. Teachers also play favorites with who they like and who they don't. I have witnessed this myself and see it everyday with other students.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 24, 2005

Overall teacher quality is relatively good, but very limited by excessive parental control. Unfortunately the control does not mean extra funding from parents. The extracurricular activies are limited to nonexistent for 6th grade students. It is a small community school with parents who are very competitive. There also appears to be extreme favortism and added activities for students with parents who are either very vocal or who have themselves grown up with teachers. This a real problem with small towns and for outsiders trying to get their kids to assimilate. Leadership folds too often to pressure. As a parent of a seventh grader at this school, I feel that this school is probably average for rural locations.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

138 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

138 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

144 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
85%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

144 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
70%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

141 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
87%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

141 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
68%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

141 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students35%
Female40%
Male29%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White36%
Economically disadvantaged12%
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students40%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English35%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant35%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students40%
Female43%
Male36%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White41%
Economically disadvantaged23%
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students46%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English40%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant40%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students36%
Female37%
Male35%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White37%
Economically disadvantaged20%
Not economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disabilities11%
Non-disabled students40%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English37%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant36%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students46%
Female51%
Male39%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White47%
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilities6%
Non-disabled students52%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English47%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant46%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students36%
Female35%
Male36%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White35%
Economically disadvantaged21%
Not economically disadvantaged48%
Students with disabilities7%
Non-disabled students39%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English36%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant36%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students41%
Female46%
Male37%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White41%
Economically disadvantaged30%
Not economically disadvantaged51%
Students with disabilities7%
Non-disabled students45%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English41%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant41%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students42%
Female35%
Male47%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White42%
Economically disadvantaged41%
Not economically disadvantaged43%
Students with disabilities20%
Non-disabled students44%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English42%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant42%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students73%
Female65%
Male81%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Economically disadvantaged69%
Not economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students73%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English73%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 93% 52%
Hispanic 3% 14%
Two or more races 2% 4%
Asian 1% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Black 0% 26%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 48%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
Nurse(s)
PE instructor(s)
School social worker/counselors(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Outdoor learning lab

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Photography
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Todd Beane
Associations
  • SACS
Fax number
  • (336) 241-3904

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Art room
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Music room
  • Outdoor learning lab
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Football
  • Soccer
  • Wrestling
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Photography
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing arts
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Join PTO/PTA
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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1463 Pleasant Union Road
Trinity, NC 27370
Website: Click here
Phone: (336) 241-3900

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