Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Franklin Academy

Charter | K-12 | 1594 students

 
 

Living in Wake Forest

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $244,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $860.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 14 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 6 ratings

Sweep tile
No Purchase Necessary. Void where prohibited. Sweepstakes begins at 12:00:00 AM Pacific Time (PT) on April 1, 2014 and ends at 11:59:59 on April 30, 2014 (the “Promotion Period”). Open to legal residents of the U.S. and D.C., 13 years and older. Each school that receives a new, published review will get one (1) entry into the sweepstakes, up to ten (10) entries throughout the Promotion Period. See the Official Rules for details. Sponsor: GreatSchools, 1999 Harrison St., Suite 1100, Oakland, CA 94612.

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

42 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted October 30, 2011

This is our first year applying at and attending Franklin Academy....what a disappointment. For those of you thinking about sending your child here, be sure to do your research first. The children are packed into these classes like sardines and there are 28 children in my child's class. After hearing nothing but positive from the community I've yet to see what all the hoopla is about. While the direct instruction is effective, the stress that is put on these children is ricidulous. AND, don't expect any support from teachers and especially administration. They don't care to get to know you or your child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 28, 2011

My 2 children have been students at Franklin Academy for 5 yrs now and they are thriving academically. I could not ask for a better school. keep up the good work teachers and administraters
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 8, 2011

My son is finishing up kindergarten at Franklin Academy. So far we are very pleased with the school. No school is perfect, and FA may not be the right fit for every one, but for our family it is great.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 27, 2010

Echo all the things that the other reviews have said. Fantastic program and wonderful, caring teachers. We consider ourselves extremely fortunate to have gotten in to the school. It was even worth having to endure a year of school with children in different schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 18, 2010

I love Franklin Academy. This is our second year there, and we absolutely love. My daughter is going to 5th grade this July, and my other daughter is going to kindergarten. We consider ourselves very lucky to be at Franklin Academy because of its dedicated teachers and staff they made us feel welcomed from the first day. Also, their academics are very strong and very good.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 5, 2010

I love FA because it is a private school education funded by the state and run by an outstanding staff!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 21, 2010

My children have blossomed since attending franklin academy. The staff is there for the right reasons, to educate not only the abc's of education but the entire child. Community service, character traits, and just the love that each child needs once in awhile. Nothing like it. This school is non-profit and only does community service for others.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 19, 2010

They have great teachers with a great program. We like the strict discipline policy. My kindergartner has learned much more than I ever expected him to learn in his first year of school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 14, 2010

After moving from Franklin Acadmey to a NY Public School. I have learned how good my kids had it there. It is a fantastic school !!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 29, 2009

We have three chrildren at FA grades K, 3 and 6. The sixth grader has attended since kindergarten. Best way to sum this uo is that we would forgo job promotions and any other reason to leave the area based on the concern we could not match the educational experience. Every school has pros and cons, but FA has been great for our three children and us as parents as well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 20, 2009

This school has teachers who CARE --and greatly remind me of the wonderful teachers I had as a child. They are far superior in technique and skill than the teachers my daughters encountered when they were in school.....my granddaughter is receiving the kind of education and motivation that I experienced so many years ago and which crated a life-long love of learning. Thank you, teachers and staff of Franklin Academy!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2009

Franklin Academy is a school with big ideas and high standards, and a small intimate feeling. The teachers make an effort to know all of the kids. The teachers' great attitudes rub off on the children, showing them to be kind and to care for their classmates. Great instruction and curriculum too. I could not be more pleased.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 24, 2008

Overall the school is wonderful. The children being seperated and taught at their own level is wonderful, however having a gifted child they feel the normal classes are challenging enough without doing anything extra (do not agree). The FAPS (Franklin Academy Parents) members try very hard to get parents involved, this I've seen is not always successful after 4th grade (where did the parents go?) The school has a very stringent discipline policy and you better like it or your child is not meant for Franklin Academy. This school is a huge improvement on what you get in public school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 22, 2008

I've been going to Franklin Academy for eight years and I think it is terrific. It's a school where everyone is friends with everybody, and is very safe. It has a great music Program Compliments Of Ms. Burn. I'm Chris Mathews and I love my old school


Posted May 8, 2008

School is very safe, rigerous education, FANTASTIC music program. The uniforms (slacks and collared teeshirt) are wonderful. We moved to GA to a shool with no uniforms and we constantly deal with issues of not having the right clothing. The teachers, however, are WAY over the top with discipline and are not likely to work with you if your student has any special needs. If you don't conform, their well-worn excuse is to take your child our of charter school and back into regular school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 27, 2007

We have been at Franklin since my child was in K, and is now in 5th. This has been a positive experience for all of. The school offers opportinuties for you to continue to be a part of your childs education, by being a volunteer for the different committees. By doing this our children are able to see that we are proud of their school, and therefore they too take pride in their school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 14, 2007

Wonderful school all around. We feel so fortunate to have found Franklin! Our son loves his school too.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2007

This is our first year at Franklin Academy. Our son is in 5th grade and was at his previous school since Kindergarten. He was very upset to move to a new school but after the first week at Franklin he told us that he should have transferred here years ago. He is so very happy and the students and teachers welcomed him with open arms. We are currently waiting to hear if our 1st grader and 3rd grader are accepted for next year. Great school and staff.....
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 17, 2006

This was our first elementary for our first child so my experience is limited. The academic programs seem to be good - many projects and constant homework although I think there could be more. Facilities have been limited but with the HS being completed they have more space for other activities. As this is a charter school the lack of buses and the drawing of students from all over the area is good & bad. Very diverse but I think it limits parent involvement in that it isn;t a 'community' school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 29, 2005

We feel very blessed to have gotten in to Franklin Academy last year. I have a 1st grader and a 5th grader and they both love 'their' school. We love that the school teaches children at all academic levels; dividing them into different classes according to their ability. This method, even in kindergarten, allows students to be challenged no matter where they are academically. It is very much a family atmosphere and we feel confident leaving our children in such capable hands. The teachers are incredible and the parents are excellent! The band program will blow you away. The discipline methods are stringent but needed in this day and age. We couldn't be happier!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

122 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
92%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

122 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

127 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

127 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

129 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
87%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

129 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
90%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

129 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

130 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

130 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

132 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

132 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

133 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

133 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
88%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

132 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2011.

95 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
91%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students59%
Female58%
Male60%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White58%
Economically disadvantaged85%
Not economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students60%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English59%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant59%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students63%
Female67%
Male60%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White61%
Economically disadvantaged85%
Not economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students65%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English63%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant63%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students58%
Female49%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White58%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged59%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students60%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English58%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant58%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students57%
Female55%
Male58%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Economically disadvantaged59%
Not economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students59%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English57%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant57%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students61%
Female61%
Male62%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Not economically disadvantaged65%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students65%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English61%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant61%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students54%
Female58%
Male49%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Not economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students56%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English54%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant54%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students62%
Female58%
Male66%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students64%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English62%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant62%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students50%
Female50%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White53%
Economically disadvantaged55%
Not economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students51%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English50%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students76%
Female81%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Economically disadvantaged70%
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students77%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English76%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant76%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students58%
Female54%
Male62%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White59%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Not economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students59%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English58%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant58%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students72%
Female73%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White72%
Economically disadvantaged77%
Not economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students73%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English72%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant72%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students69%
Female63%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic60%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students73%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English70%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant69%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students73%
Female74%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic60%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students77%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English74%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students83%
Female81%
Male88%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic80%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students86%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English84%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant83%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

154 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
92%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

135 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

133 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 82% in 2011.

83 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
87%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 83% in 2012.

99 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
>95%
Civics and Economics

The state average for Civics and Economics was 80% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a
English I

The state average for English I was 83% in 2012.

140 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Physical Science

The state average for Physical Science was 77% in 2011.

11 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
73%
United States History

The state average for United States History was 82% in 2011.

87 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
94%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students69%
Female70%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Economically disadvantaged60%
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students70%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English69%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant69%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Students55%
Female55%
Male55%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White58%
Economically disadvantaged30%
Not economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students56%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English55%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant55%
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Students77%
Female81%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students81%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English77%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant77%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 85% 52%
Black 5% 26%
Hispanic 4% 14%
Two or more races 3% 4%
Asian 2% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


Help other families

Millions of families turn to GreatSchools for help with their
school search. You can help these families by providing
a few details about this school.

Administrators & teachers: Let your school shine!

Help your school shine online by adding program highlights, photos and more on GreatSchools! Get started »

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

1127 Chalk Road
Wake Forest, NC 27587
Website: Click here
Phone: (919) 570-8262

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools

Jones Dairy Elementary
Wake Forest, NC


Heritage Elementary
Wake Forest, NC


Thales Academy
Wake Forest, NC



Rejoice Community School
Wake Forest, NC


Thales Academy
Wake Forest, NC


ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT