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Wake Forest Middle School

Public | 6-8 | 1088 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 5 ratings

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21 reviews of this school


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Posted June 19, 2013

I have to say I was very concerned when I learned that my son did not get into Heritage Middle. We have been here two years now and I am very happy with the school. They have made several changes to the curriculum for advanced students. Next year my son will be taking an online class for high school credit. His teachers are fair and consistent. All of my son's progress is noted in SPAN and I have the ability to review the course syllabus online. Definitely better than expected.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 17, 2012

I am very impressed with the quality of education given at this school and the dedication of the teachers. I feel that my child is safe and well taken care of.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 17, 2012

We love this school, the teachers are great, the community is like a family. I just wish that we lived a little closer. The teachers and administration provide strong bridges to home and as a result our children are successful.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 24, 2011

awesome very good scholl have partys its a very awesom school an imma student cool fun nice dat the words to describe


Posted August 22, 2011

When we moved here in 2005, there was an article in the local paper that stated WFRMS violence rating was the worst in the whole Wake County system. This was my assigned school and in 2 years i would be sending 2 daughters to the school. To say i was concerned was an understatement. BUT the school has a no tolerence system, which means ALL incidents are dealt with and reported, students have been reassigned so many times, that it is not the same students in the school, AND, MOST IMPORTANTLY, my honor roll kids have received a FANTASTIC education!!!! Teachers are superb, challenging, and we cannot be more pleased as parents. It's all about expectations folks - and living in an imperfect world includes imperfect schools. Make the best of it and doing one's best and getting along with other's are the same code of behavior that works in most of life's situations.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 7, 2011

we moved in the middle of the year from a smaller county and since my son has ADD I was scared he would be lost in WFRMS but the teachers have made sure that he is on track, and his grades have never been better! The staff is very friendly and the counselors seeem to always be there to answer questions. I am very proud that my son has been a cougar!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 29, 2011

I am a former student of wfrms. I moved there from another state in my 8th grade year. I like the people of the school real well but the staff was horrific. The teachers would have conversations in the hall way during class when we should have been learning Nd the principles were just pathetic. "patchy" Jacobs is quite a rude man who accused myself of selling xtascy in 8th grade because he saw me on camera tKing my medicine at the fountain and said I was distributing "x" to other students. I'm sorry but I didn't even know what xtascy was in 8th grads. After my two week suspension, the day I came back I withdrew from the school and came back to where I moved from. Very sad school to send your children to. Just consider yourself warned


Posted February 15, 2011

I have had so many problems with this school. My son (6th)was seriously bullied, the teacher was not in the classroom, but was in the hall socializing with other teachers (during class time). The school officer is unenvolved or supportive. My son says he sits in the office all day and sure enough when I went to speak with the principle the officer sat in the office the enitre time I was there (45 min). My sons interest in school has seriously been slacking this year. The teachers are down right rude to the students!! The things I hear about that go on there are horrible!! We will not be attending this school any longer!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 5, 2010

Wake Forest-Rolesville Middle is ran poorly and was the worse school my daughter has ever attended. The environment is so horrific that I pulled my child out as soon as possible which was before the next school year after all the drama and disrespect she faced in her 7th grade year. The last straw was when I had to go to the school after someone stole her lunch # and she was the one questioned and called a liar but the girl that stole her lunch # was not questioned and at this point my daughter had already been at the school eating lunch for 6 months. What got me was the girl and my daughter looked nothing at all alike but I guess to them we all look alike, huh? At that point I lost it on them. She is now doing very well at Heritage Middle!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 5, 2010

This has been my son's first year at this school and he has struggled the entire year due to ADHD and learning disabilities. The school keeps trying to push off testing and giving our son the help he needs and deserves to be successful in school, despite federal guidelines in place that mandate testing. The school administration has been cold and concerned mainly with their budget and less about students needs. On a bright note, his teachers this year have been great and have done a great deal to work with him, but they are hog-tied a bit in what they are capable of doing for him due to the higher ups. I do not feel our son will ever get what he needs from this school, even if there is any success to our fight to get the testing and IEP he needs - not a school for special needs
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 1, 2010

My child has had a wonderful year at WFRMS. The teachers (Dolphins team) just loved her and she loved them! They were all so supportive when she needed help and were the first to praise her when she did well! Although the PTA is going thru some tough times...the new PTA for the 2010-2011 is going to be fantastic! Im looking forward to helping out more and feel that my child is getting a very good education. So many Jr Highs are experiencing tough times w/high enrollment, pre-teen attitudes, etc. but I feel the staff at WFRMS is addressing these issues as well as they can. I feel my child is safe & well taken care of there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 18, 2010

As a former teacher at WFRMS, I can honestly say that it is a terrible environment for both faculty and students. The leadership is deplorable, parents involvement is non-existent, and the academic bar is set so low that teachers are basically told that they are not allowed to retain any students. IEPs are not followed, there is no teacher union, and I would home-school my own child before sending them to WFRMS.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 26, 2009

Great school. The teachers support all students and work very hard to insure all children are successful.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 24, 2009

I have high regards for this school. My son just moved here from another country and he not only enjoyed his first year in WFRHS but he excelled in both academics and orchestra. The teachers have been wonderful and we get informational updates from phone calls and the website. To those parents who have criticized the school, bear in mind that schools can only give and do so much, it is up to the student to take advantage of what the school can offer.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 10, 2009

I have found that this school is a bit 'unfriendly' in regards to parent school involvement. The school comes across to me as disorganized and lacking in proper leadership. Having my child at the school caused me to be concerned in respect to how much I noticed that the students were actually getting away with. Discipline lacked at the school and the day my child left and moved up to the high school was one of the best days of my child's academic career. I have found at times the principal (Elaine Hanzer) was unable to be reached and seemed to have other things on her mind other than the student's best interest. If your child is made to go to Wake Forest Rolesville Middle School, I wish you the very best!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 16, 2009

Most of the teachers my son had were knowledgeable and caring. I always knew what was going on in the school thanks to an automated messaging system that calls the home with the principal of the school leaving a detailed message about upcoming events and important information. The one thing I feel the school needs is a more proactive approach to bullying and fighting. My child, and the children of some of my friends, experienced constant, daily picking from students using profanity that I cannot post. I would like to see behavior specialist posted in the hallways during all transition times, and severe consequences for bullying.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 17, 2007

I am happy to say this school has improved. I have seen dedicated efforts by the principal, teachers, and staff to address the shortcomings faced by all public schools in Wake County with its rapid growth. The basics subjects are covered well, and there are many electives to choose from, including the arts.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 2, 2007

I am a student at Wake Forest Rolesville Middle School in the 6th grade. This school could use some updating since it's so old but it's very big and there are great outdoor spaces. When 8th grade is switching periods there is alot of cussing in the hall ways and that could be improved. But the teachers are very nice and the principals are nice too. Our school is very high in academics. This is a wonderful school and any kid would enjoy it.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 8, 2006

I moved here from NY a year ago and I am disappointed with this school. I believe this school has more than its share of unruley students. I do believe a stronger supervision presence in the halls may alleviate some of the unnecessary activity between classes.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 4, 2006

Other schools have issues with textbooks too! This is NOT the only school with 30+ students in the classroom.. this is a county wide problem in high growth areas such as outs. This is a good school. Rules are in place to ensure student safety and student accountability. Academics are as strong as anywhere. The teacher/adm. are caring and well seasoned professionals. Maybe you should talk to your child's bus driver regarding conduct issues and stop blaming the SCHOOL. Trust me.. the school across the street isn't full of little darlings either.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

314 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
78%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

311 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
75%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

369 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

370 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
64%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

387 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

389 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
74%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

361 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
75%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students48%
Female54%
Male42%
Black32%
Asian85%
Hispanic36%
Multiracial27%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Economically disadvantaged35%
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilities10%
Non-disabled students55%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English49%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant48%
Academically gifted95%

Reading

All Students49%
Female56%
Male41%
Black34%
Asian69%
Hispanic44%
Multiracial30%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilities10%
Non-disabled students56%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English50%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant49%
Academically gifted89%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students36%
Female40%
Male32%
Black22%
Asiann/a
Hispanic20%
Multiracial36%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White54%
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilities10%
Non-disabled students40%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English38%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant36%
Academically gifted85%

Reading

All Students41%
Female46%
Male36%
Black25%
Asiann/a
Hispanic31%
Multiracial50%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantaged51%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students47%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English43%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant41%
Academically gifted93%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students26%
Female29%
Male24%
Black12%
Asian43%
Hispanic21%
Multiracial33%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White36%
Economically disadvantaged14%
Not economically disadvantaged35%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students32%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English28%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant26%
Academically gifted73%

Reading

All Students38%
Female46%
Male29%
Black17%
Asian36%
Hispanic31%
Multiracial56%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White52%
Economically disadvantaged23%
Not economically disadvantaged48%
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students46%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English40%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant38%
Academically gifted83%

Science

All Students67%
Female66%
Male69%
Black49%
Asian69%
Hispanic53%
Multiracial77%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Economically disadvantaged51%
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilities11%
Non-disabled students75%
Limited English proficiency21%
Proficient in English70%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant67%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

233 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students62%
Female66%
Male57%
Black47%
Asian80%
Hispanic54%
Multiracial55%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White68%
Economically disadvantaged48%
Not economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilities27%
Non-disabled students64%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English62%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant62%
Academically gifted85%

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 47% 52%
Black 30% 26%
Hispanic 16% 14%
Two or more races 4% 4%
Asian 3% 3%
American Indian 1% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 41%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
Music
  • Band
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Ms Stacey Weddle
Fax number
  • (919) 554-8435

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Cafeteria
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Football
Girls sports
  • Cheerleading

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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1800 South Main Street
Wake Forest, NC 27587
Website: Click here
Phone: (919) 554-8440

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