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Washington Montessori

Charter | K-8 | 318 students

Quality Montessori education in a public school setting

 

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Living in Washington

Situated in a small town neighborhood. The median home value is $125,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $690.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 8 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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22 reviews of this school


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Posted August 21, 2013

I love this school. I have three children here at three different levels. The administration and staff are passionate about teaching Montessori. The schools academics are rich. My children are becoming independent learners and thinkers. My children's emotional and social needs are nurtured. They are becoming problem solvers.They are gaining a sense of community and world awareness. This school teaches the whole child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 19, 2013

I am a bit stymied by the negative reviews of this school. My family has been associated with Washington Montessori for the past four years, and I can honestly say that it has been a godsend. My children have thrived academically and socially. Two of my children are currently enrolled in this institution, and my third child is a recent Washington Montessori Middle School graduate. Yes, there were administrative changes at the school this past year, and I understand that some felt slighted by these changes. However, it stands to reason that there will always be stress associated with these types of transition. What bothers me is that families would pull their kids from an institution that they claimed to have believed in, rather than to allow a new administration to settle in and find its groove. I hope that these families find an school that meets their particular needs. I can certainly say that my family supports this school, its teachers, and its administrative body. We are thankful that we have had the opportunity to be part of Washington Montessori.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 29, 2013

We love this school! The teachers are wonderful and the environment is friendly and welcoming. This is an educational community which helps students with more than academics. It helps students with true life lessons -- working well with others, taking personal responsibility, and using talents to the best ability. Teachers/ administration are receptive to any concerns we make and we are met with sincerity and understanding. Parents are encouraged for participation and thankfully the school seems to effectively deal with bad behavior, instead of letting it fester as in most public schools. In what other school can you witness 1st, 2nd and 3rd graders moving from work station to work station and actually DOING work quietly and respectfully, all while students actively help each other under the guidance of the teacher? If you are looking for a traditional approach to learning this is not for you; but if you are searching for a school which values academic achievement while promoting a loving and giving social environment, then your search is over. I am only ranking this 4 stars because of the lack of extra curricular opportunities, but there is an excellent violin program and soccer.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 28, 2013

Success of children is secondary. Something in 2012 - 2013 changed. Kids are being pulled from the school. They are not following the Montessori method.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 8, 2013

The teachers, parents and school environment are phenomenal. This has been an excellent choice for our children, but is not for everyone or every child; it is not a one-size-fits-all traditional educational approach. Our children are blessed with the opportunity to learn in an environment that fosters grace, courtesy and creativity as much as it does academics.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 9, 2013

Sadly I will remove my children from this school at the end of this school year. Lack of proper administration has caused all sorts of problems. The teachers are wonderful, but overwhelmed due to the lack of leadership. The atmosphere of this school is unpleasant and what a shame that it is so.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 11, 2013

You can never please everyone. This is a highly sought after school for a very good reason. The administration cares, the teachers care, and the children learn in a positive, creative way. This is a special place that offers an alternative to the public school testing drill and kill mentality. My son has soared in a few short months at this school! They are working hard to continue to make this the best choice in the Greenville/Washington area. I applaud the administration and all of the parents who work hard in a positive way to seek change and move in great directions for the future!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 2, 2013

This school was awesome. My children really enjoyed the environment up till this year. New administration is in over their heads. Teachers are now pressured with added responsibility to take up for the lack of leadership. If things are not changed for next year we will be looking for an alternative.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 28, 2012

I love this school. We are going through some transitions this year, once again. Personally I am in a wait an see mode for next year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 28, 2010

I found this school when my family had to relocate due to my husband's work. We could not afford private Montessori so public charter was a wonderful option for us. Our children have thrived socially and academically. We decided to relocated to the Washington area so our children will be able to attend all the way thru the 8th grade. Washington, NC is a small town and the Montessori School is it's best kept secret. We will be supporters for life!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 30, 2010

I absolutely love this school! Not everyone is here because of the Montessori education that is offered. My family has chosen to attend because of the Montessori education and excellent teachers! The new administrator has been wonderful and all 3 of our children have continued to excel in every way imaginable! I'm so glad this school continues to hold it's students, staff and families accountable! What a great school! I can't imagine being any where else!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 24, 2010

My children have had a wonderful time at WMPCS. I'm so glad that they were able to attend. Two of my children still attend. The experiences will last them a life time. I know that this was the right choice for our family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 6, 2009

love this school so fun nice kids good learning and easy to learn i highly recommend this school
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 29, 2009

Wow, I can promise you that Washington Montessori would not be recommended by me to anyone. We moved from Michigan, where the schools are ranked in the top 10 in the country. What a rude awakening this school was for us. It is an embarrasment to true Montessori education. My children attended this school for 4 years. They have been in public school for 3 years now and we are very happy that we realized that we were actually doing them harm by keeping them there. This school is full of problem kids which continually distract from the others. Their education is sacraficed for those who continually disrupt. Hopefully, the new head of school with his public school background will get a handle on the problems there and we can stop wasting the tax payers money.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 28, 2009

This Montessori School is awesome. The new building that Chairman Dr. Scott has worked so hard on is awesome! Exactly like the Montessori school I came from in Connecticut, which, by the way was ranked #2 in the U.S. (day and night verse beaufort county schools). I guess if you lived in beaufort county your whole life you would think the schools are incredible.(There not) My child is now in the 98%tile in the national scores. Love the environment. my child is not sitting in a chair all day long. She now has a chance to be a leader and make choices of her own in school. She can move to the next grade level and do higher grade work as dictates, can't do that in Public School.thats my biggest praise. My child is not stuck listening to a Teacher Re-teach problem kids all day, she goes at her own Pace.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 6, 2008

I cannot reccomend this school to anyone. My child attended Washington Montessori for over a year. The teachers are under qualified...many do not even have teaching degrees. The kids spend a significant portion of the day waiting for a teacher to look at the work that they have done or waiting for a 'lesson'. There is far too much sitting around and/or playing going on. Also, they have virtually no reading program. My child now goes to the public school, and is thriving. A child in the public schools will learn more in one day that most will learn in a week at Montessori. The public schools in this town are great. The teachers are highly qualified. The children are consistently on task, and there are very few discipline problems.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 20, 2008

The school doesn't not value the input of the parents. Sad.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 30, 2007

We have been a part of WMPCS since its second year. I have watched it grow into a wonderful campus surrounded by acres of trails, an outside amphitheater and a rock paved labyrinth. The children learn not only in the classroom but outside in it's peaceful environment. The teachers always go above and beyond. They believe in our children and the Montessori philosophy. At times our test scores may not reflect the true knowledge our children hold. We do not 'teach' to the test as other schools. It is a nuturing place to grow and requires parental envolvment at almost every level. This is what I believe today's society lacks that WMPCS offers. Like other schools we have our 'growing pains' and are not perfect. But, if you are looking for a safe and nuturing environment for your child to learn in, it is one you should explore.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 26, 2007

My daughter spent 4 years attending this school. After concerns for her academic level were made clear, we were repeatedly informed that by 6th grade she would catch up. We have since moved her to a private school where she struggles with work that should have been covered in 3rd grade. She is ca slowly catching up but her spelling, math, study skills and her attitude toward doing school and homework have left much to be desired. I would not and do not recommend this school to anyone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 26, 2007

I have been very impressed with this school. My child is learning how to learn, not just memorize. The math, geography, language and character development are major strengths of this school. Our community is very lucky to have Washington Montessori is here.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

33 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
69%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

33 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
72%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
18%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
>95%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
84%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
13%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
83%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

25 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

25 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
73%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

25 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-95%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
55%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students41%
Female25%
Male56%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White36%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students48%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English41%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant41%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students56%
Female50%
Male63%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students68%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English56%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant56%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students27%
Female18%
Male38%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White32%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged38%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students32%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English28%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant27%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students52%
Female47%
Male56%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White57%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students57%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English53%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant52%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students18%
Female18%
Male18%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White19%
Economically disadvantaged9%
Not economically disadvantaged24%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students17%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English19%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant18%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students43%
Female41%
Male46%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White38%
Economically disadvantaged55%
Not economically disadvantaged35%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students44%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English44%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant43%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students21%
Female18%
Male27%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White29%
Economically disadvantaged9%
Not economically disadvantaged29%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students26%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English22%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant21%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students13%
Female13%
Male13%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White11%
Economically disadvantaged10%
Not economically disadvantaged14%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students16%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English13%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant13%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students65%
Female63%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White59%
Economically disadvantaged60%
Not economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students76%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English65%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant65%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students55%
Female50%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White65%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students57%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English57%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant55%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students55%
Female50%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students52%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English57%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant55%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students60%
Female54%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White63%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students65%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English63%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students76%
Female62%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students74%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English79%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant76%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students-95%
Female92%
Male-95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students-95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English-95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-95%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 81% 52%
Hispanic 10% 14%
Black 5% 26%
Two or more races 3% 4%
American Indian 0% 1%
Asian 0% 3%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Assistant principal(s)
ELL/ESL Coordinator
Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
PE instructor(s)
Special education coordinator
Speech and language therapist(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

Special education / special needs

Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Mathematics
  • Science

Arts & music

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Music
School facilities
  • Music room
Music
  • Orchestra

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
School leaders can update this information here.

School basics

School start time
  • 8:15 am
School end time
  • 3:00 pm
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • Before school: starts at 7:00 a.m.
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Jen Hales
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Email
  • austin.smigel@
Age at which early childhood or Pre-K program begins
  • 3 years old
Gender
  • Coed
Fax number
  • (252) 946-5938

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Independent Study
  • Individually guided instruction
  • Montessori
  • Multi-aged
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Environmental
  • Global
  • Humanities
  • Mathematics
  • Music
  • Science
  • Service learning
  • Social justice
  • Writing
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • No
Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
Transportation options
  • None
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Music room
School leaders can update this information here.

Sports

Boys sports
  • Soccer
Girls sports
  • Soccer

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • None
Music
  • Orchestra
Performing arts
  • None
Media arts
  • None
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Join PTO/PTA
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

2330 Old Bath Hwy
Washington, NC 27889
Website: Click here
Phone: (252) 946-1977

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