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Waxhaw Elementary School

Public | PK-5 | 589 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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16 reviews of this school


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Posted March 27, 2014

Please invent a better IEP program for kids who are struggling. We give our opinions, but the school never listens to our concerns. I think all public schools are terrible. Teachers don't spend enough time with students who need extra help. The teachers just put them in a corner and carry on with the other kids who are on track for their grade level.I wish Union County would bulid a school just for kids who need help or are behind grade level to provide extra assistance.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 9, 2013

Compassionate and caring. Learning is of prime importance. Aftercare is available as well as girls' track, boys' athletics, chess club, and Good News Club. Each child is cared for individually and helped along his/her road to success. The staff tries to work with parents to bring out the best in their child.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted June 23, 2013

Not happy at all! The "phase in" Kindergarten program was a disorganized mess. Some teachers are burned out and some should be forced to retire. Carpool line in AM & PM is a nightmare!. Parental suggestions made to staff are brushed off and /or ignored. Moved my children elsewhere and now they are much happier and learning more!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 1, 2012

Waxhaw is a 2010-2011 school of distinction:-) Teachers care so much about the students. I agree that the PTA needs more parental involvement. School is doing a great job.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 27, 2010

The teachers and staff of Waxhaw Elementary work to help meet the individual needs of its students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 22, 2010

Waxhaw Elementary has a consistent record of being a school of Distinction, the teachers talk to each and every child they have and review that childs skills and areas that need improvement and work individually with each child to master the grade they are in.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 22, 2010

We need more bible based teaching to help the children learn that their creator is the one to look to in rough times and not other venues that are destructive to productive lives. Studies have proven that schools that have bible based principals and teachings that honor God have higher academic scores. This is not a coincidence,
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 22, 2010

Great Teachers,Great school!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

Great Teachers, A School Iam Proud for my children to attend
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 27, 2009

This is our first year at Waxhaw Elementary, and I find it to be a very good school. My boys are in 2nd and 3rd grade, and both their teachers are dedicated and passionate about their learning. Ms. Stuka (3d grade) challeged her class so much that my son whizzed through the EOG.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 6, 2009

I am a parent of a student at Waxhaw Elementary School. I give the school high marks in every way. My son excelled greatly due to the high quaility teachers and their assistants. I give this school 5 stars. They focus on education and not what house everyone lives in and what they drive and how much money you make. They are the real thing!! Keep up the good work.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 26, 2008

School is very welcoming for new comers, but after tha phase you start to find the gaps. There is lack of: challenging curriculum, new teaching tecniques (very old fashion). Teacher and administration very worried about discipline and EOG performance and not academics. A kindergardener is expectec to not talk at lunch, make lines for everything otherwise they will get a good high pitch scream. There is a lot techers with too many years in the same classroom and/or school than needs to be update. Last but not list Mr. Jones (principal assistant) needs to mature and really solve situations not just be a good listener.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 16, 2008

School is very clean nice physical environment. However the testing scores at the skill are definitely sub-par. I have to supplement homework or lack there of that comes from her teachers. The teachers are very nice though. I wish they would challenge the kids more than what I see. The school is not all bad, but academics are lacking.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 1, 2007

No supervision, my child had things stolen from their desk, seems that the teachers care more about chatting than watching the children out on the playground. Glad my kid's no longer a student there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 10, 2007

We moved here from NJ and we really liked Waxhaw Elementary. My children were accepted right off the bat and really enjoyed their first year there. The teachers seem very dedicated. They need to lighten up on the no talking at lunchtime and breakfast especially if you come in to have lunch or breakfast with your child. Other than that, we were happy with the academics and the office personnel were very nice and nuturing. Mrs. Barden and Mrs. O'Leary are exactly who should be in an elementary school, they are very nice and helpful to new students and their parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 29, 2005

A very excellant school with an active PTA that works hard to improve the the overall school enviroment. My two boys, one still there ,the other now in middle school, have both improved their reading and math skills as a result of both teacher quality and the inititive from the administration to succeed. A very very good school.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
72%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

115 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

115 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
82%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
66%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students51%
Female57%
Male46%
Black8%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Economically disadvantaged44%
Not economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilities8%
Non-disabled students57%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English51%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant51%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students41%
Female50%
Male35%
Black15%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White45%
Economically disadvantaged37%
Not economically disadvantaged44%
Students with disabilities17%
Non-disabled students45%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English42%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant41%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students63%
Female64%
Male61%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic58%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White68%
Economically disadvantaged58%
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students66%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English63%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant63%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students61%
Female74%
Male47%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic75%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Economically disadvantaged52%
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students63%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English62%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant61%
Academically gifted93%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students45%
Female37%
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White46%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Not economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disabilities8%
Non-disabled students50%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English45%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant45%
Academically gifted94%

Reading

All Students53%
Female47%
Male60%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White60%
Economically disadvantaged44%
Not economically disadvantaged60%
Students with disabilities25%
Non-disabled students57%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English53%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant53%
Academically gifted94%

Science

All Students42%
Female29%
Male55%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White47%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Not economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disabilities25%
Non-disabled students44%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English42%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant42%
Academically gifted78%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 78% 52%
Hispanic 10% 14%
Black 9% 26%
Two or more races 2% 4%
Asian 1% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 48%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Ms Emily McGinnis
Associations
  • SACS
Fax number
  • (704) 843-4259
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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1101 Old Providence Road
Waxhaw, NC 28173
Website: Click here
Phone: (704) 290-1590

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