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Sandy Ridge Elementary School

Public | K-5 | 890 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 4 ratings

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39 reviews of this school


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Posted January 10, 2013

The current principal started last year, which was our first year. I question a few things she has done. Because the school is growing, she decided to pull children out of their class four full months into the school year last year to reduce class sizes ( just as these children got settled they get to start all over). I understand the need for smaller classes but waiting 4 months to do it is insane. She also has no communication skills. I went to a family fun night because I thought it would be a good time to meet this new principal (which was advertised in the flyer that came home) and I went up to her and she just blankly stood there as if she would rather be home sleeping or something. Yesterday, I was at the school and this principal saw me from about 25 feet away and as we got closer to each other instead of looking at me and saying hello or at least smiling to acknowledge me she decided to look down at the ground. This year my child was physically bullied and the principal had not made the child's parents aware of the incident (had my child not tell me about it I would never have known either). She doesn't get my vote as principal of the year (two years in a row)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 24, 2012

My son attended this school in first grade and literally had nightmares about it for over a year after we pulled him out. I now live in another state and when I tell people here what we went through jaws drop. It is hard to even express the level of disrespect, the lack of professionalism and the degree of abuse in which the staff operates. This is definitely not a healthy environment for children. Run, don't walk away from this place!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 14, 2012

This is our second year at Sandy Ridge and Union County Public Schools. Prior to that we were in Mecklenburg County and then the last 7 years in Collier County FL. I read the other reviews prior to responding and feel there is a lot of truth in the feedback. We are currently experiencing some of the issues mentioned. I don't feel my child is challenged, his home work is quick and doesn't require much thought. I do believe the required testing takes up valuable teaching time. I do believe the school is run in a non-emotional environment in an effort to easily control the masses and cut down on the bullying by limiting interactions. In the long run it doesn't teach them valuable life skills.. I strongly believe socializing in and out of school is a life lesson and should be encouraged, not discouraged and punished. I would like to see the school use the feedback collected here to reassess their strengths and improve on a better environment for our children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 12, 2012

My kids have had the pleasure of attending Sandy Ridge for the past 3 years. We have had a principal turnover and a few teachers come and go, but throughout my experience at Sandy Ridge parental involvement has been strong and the quality of the teachers and administrators has been outstanding. I love my kids' school and would strongly recommend to anyone thinking of sending their kids there. Sandy Ridge demands a lot from its students, but the teachers are very supportive and go out of their way to make sure every student is developing good study habits.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 25, 2011

We moved from SRES last year to New Jersey, but I have to admit that SRES is an excellent school. The AIG program is fantastic there and I miss that here in NJ!! The teachers here in NJ said my daughter adjusted easily to a difficult curriculum here in NJ, not knowing about SRES standards and AIG program!!!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 20, 2011

This is our last year at Sandy Ridge, my daughter will be starting Middle School this fall. We have had a very positive experience at SR. Mr Childers is an excellent principal. We have been very fortunate to have had great teachers, with the exception of one year. Our 5th grade math and science teacher has been fantastic. Overall, I would give this school very high marks. Keep up the good work Mr Childers and the staff!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 19, 2011

My children have been happy at Sandy Ridge. Neither has had any issues with the school being too strict. As far as pulling "cards" - even my perfectionist child does not find this system to be a problem, since they get to start over daily (enforcement varies greatly by teacher as is typical in most schools.). Besides, who wants a classroom of 25 kids "freely expressing" themselves all at the same time? My shy daughter has made plenty of friends at school and has time to chat with them at recess or the second half of lunch. Our experience is that Tom Childers takes very seriously the individual needs of each child. Each year you get to fill out a questionnaire about your child - your chance to "request" a certain type of teacher (not by name but by teaching style that works for your child.) Academics- our children are in the AIG (gifted) program and the (Singapore) Math program is very strong-wish they had AIG for all subjects. They take EOG standardized tests seriously because of the implications if they don t. This school is probably as good as you are going to get around here unless you spend the $10-20K for private school ($3K-13 more than public schools has to work with.)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 4, 2011

Sandy Ridge Elementary is indeed strict--it is not a country club. There are high expectations for learning here. This place is a blue ribbon school for a reason! My child enjoys going to school each day, and yep--he gets card pulls. It's all how parents address these tickets at home that can either make learning here stressful or you go with the flow. Kids are kids and often have a hard time focusing or staying on task. If your child comes home with a card pull, you should understand that they are like most of the other kids at SR. Don't take the cards so seriously, our teacher gives them to my son (and most others in the class) but he comes home with great grades on his report card, etc. Parents need to chill out with these cards--they are not the end of the world. We've been at this school since the beginning, and have not seen a decrease in quality. Overall, this a top-notch school. It isn't perfect, but it's as good as it gets for free education in the U.S. We feel pretty lucky to have our kids go here and not have to pay a dime for it. It's elementary school, people! Our kids have a long way to go before we get all twisted up about a few cards and other minor things.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 26, 2010

My daughter was at this school a few years ago. when it first opened it was the greatest year my daughter has ever had. by the time she was about to graduate, the school was like a military compound. I agree with the person bellow me. no free expression aloud. ridiculous. no reason for it. these were well behaved children and now they are stifled. all the good teachers got transfered and left the school. I don't know what its like that. the better choice is Rea View in that area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 22, 2010

People always make the mistake of thinking a school is itself good or bad. the 10 schools are excellent because of the children that go there. airlift the school into downtown charlotte and lets see the test scores. that being said, this is not the school for open, free spirited children. don't think your child will meet any kids here because they are essentially unable to speak, look at, or smile at another child without drawing the card. can't speak in the bathroom, don't dare get too close to the walls and touch them(cards) . just sit for six hours (this is kindergarten) and fold your hands, don't move and do as the teachers tell you. do not squirm or you will draw a card. i originally couldn't understand why so many neighbors had all their kids at latin school and paid for education, now i see why.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 12, 2010

I think this school is fantastic! The faculty and staff are very professional and care so much about their students. The teachers go to great lengths to provide the best education possible and really care about their students. As for the comments about reading, research shows that children learn more from reading alone then they do from any other curriculum. How are students suppose to practice what they are taught during lessons if they are not given time to read on their own. Not to mention students are not really reading alone that long, the teacher gives a lesson, then conferences either with a group or individually. In my child s class the assistant helps out and so do any parent volunteers. Plus this reading program was created in the Northeast, so students taught up there should be very familiar with the program and it would not have changed test scores when the school first opened. The spelling program could be stronger, but it is the same all over Union County and students are tested for this aside from reading. I have been very pleased with this school overall and know that the teachers are doing their very best for our children!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 27, 2010

I took the time to point the Principal of Sandy Ridge to the comments here and had the pleasure of speaking with him... He called me within minutes of the email I sent. What's unfortunate is that he wasn't aware of these 'issues' or 'complaints' since he never received a call or email from the parents who are making these negative remarks. I would encourage anyone with concerns to make the administration of the school aware.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 30, 2010

I was disappointed to see that the reading test scores for the school have gone down over the past couple of years. There is a large population of kids that have transferred from schools in the Northeast, most of which used a more traditional reading curriculum, often a Scholastic reading textbook that correlated with vocabulary and spelling . I can't help but wonder if the students' test scores were higher in the first year or two they attended Sandy Ridge because they were transferring in with a solid reading foundation. If the students' reading scores continue to decline, it would suggest that the current reading program is not giving them the skills they need. Though the school selects strong choices of books for independent reading, the reading curriculum itself is weak.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 18, 2010

My child attended this school for first and second grades. Their reading program is non-exsistent. Whoever heard of 7 and 8 year olds sitting at their desk reading silently? How can you learn from this? My child was always below grade level in reading. We asked that our child get extra reading help with the reading specialist but the teacher said that her reading score was too high for help, but she's below grade level??? We moved back to Mecklenburg county and my child is happier even though she had to repeat the second grade. She is also getting the help she needs at her new school. The reading and spelling programs are excellent. The children have a reading textbook and read aloud everyday. My child also gets extra reading time with a specialist and reads AR books. I am so glad that we made the move to CMS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 8, 2010

I just received a newsletter from this school. Apparently the writer does not know the difference between there, their and they're. So think twice please, do not make the same mistake we did.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 5, 2010

I also agree with the past few reviews. My child has just been moved up in the spelling program due to his high level of reading not because he can spell the words. When I come to the school to volunteer the moral of the teachers seems low. The math is very basic and most of the time takes my son 5 min to do. While the Music, PE and Spanish programs are great the current Art program is below average at best. My child comes home with crayon drawings, and a lot of folded paper. This is causing a problem when it comes to creative writing and creative thinking. On paper this school looks great, but if you look past the fluff the school has gone down hill these past few years.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 2, 2010

I quite agree with the previous 2 reviews. I have a 4th grader, and feel like I have to run a parallel home school, since the teaching is so inadequate. The teacher has been absent at least once every two weeks. There is hardly any differentiated instruction, be it math or reading. Language arts is barely covered. Spelling is not up to grade level. The school has no graded reading curriculum, no reading text book is recommended, nor does the school have an acclerated reader program. This school is not as great as it made out to be.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 1, 2010

I have mixed feelings about this school. I have a daughter in 2nd grade and a lot of time seems to be spent in testing the kids --- testing for spelling groups, testing for reading groups, testing for math groups. By the time everyone is all evaluated and put in their correct group very little learning is accomplished before the process seems to start all over again! (They seem to try to regroup at least 3 times per year). In addition, the reading groups are practically non-existant and consist mostly of children reading silently to themselves. A group might meet with a teacher maybe once a week. In math, very little emphasis is placed on learning the material, only understanding it. Be prepared to work with your child at home if you want them to memorize anything. The spelling 'sort' program is also weak and many parents are unhappy with it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 21, 2009

Sandy Ridge Elementary is a first-rate school. The Sandy Ridge educational system provides a great foundation for high-level reading, writing, math, science and critical thinking skills for children. The parents and nearby community are very involved with assisting school officials. Because of this, Sandy Ridge must be one of the finest elementary schools in the country.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 4, 2009

I feel that this school is a great school. My girls have been attending SR for a few years now and have always enjoyed going. We did loose a few great teachers due to county 'mixing things up'. One being the Art Teacher who was one of my daughters role models. We will just have to see how the year goes, till now we have loved the school and felt like we where getting a top education.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

148 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

148 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

165 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

165 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

169 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

169 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
95%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

169 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students69%
Female69%
Male69%
Black50%
Asian83%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White68%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilities27%
Non-disabled students72%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English69%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant69%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students64%
Female69%
Male60%
Black60%
Asian75%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White62%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged65%
Students with disabilities27%
Non-disabled students67%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English66%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant64%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students70%
Female66%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White72%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students74%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English70%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant70%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students72%
Female68%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students76%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English72%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant72%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students80%
Female77%
Male82%
Black60%
Asian-95%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilities40%
Non-disabled students82%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English80%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant80%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students72%
Female80%
Male65%
Black30%
Asian77%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilities10%
Non-disabled students76%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English72%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant72%
Academically gifted-95%

Science

All Students73%
Female69%
Male76%
Black50%
Asian92%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilities40%
Non-disabled students75%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English73%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 81% 52%
Asian 7% 3%
Black 6% 26%
Hispanic 4% 14%
Two or more races 2% 4%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 3%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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Awards

Academic awards received in the past 3 years
  • North Carolina Honor School of Excellence (2007)
  • North Carolina Honor School of Excellence (2006)

Special education / special needs

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Special education
Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Autism
  • Multiple disabilities
  • Other health impairments
  • Specific learning disabilities
  • Speech and language impairments

Arts & music

Music
  • Choir / Chorus

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Gifted / high performing
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School start time
  • 7:45 am
School end time
  • 2:15 pm
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Ms Cindy Croffut
Fax number
  • (704) 243-3812

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Gifted / high performing
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Special education
Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Autism
  • Multiple disabilities
  • Other health impairments
  • Specific learning disabilities
  • Speech and language impairments
Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
School leaders can update this information here.

School culture

Dress Code
  • Dress code
School leaders can update this information here.

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Planning ahead

Students typically attend these schools after graduating
Marvin Ridge Middle School
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

10101 Waxhaw Manor Drive
Waxhaw, NC 28173
Website: Click here
Phone: (704) 290-1505

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