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Cuthbertson Middle School

Public | 6-8 | 1195 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 8 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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11 reviews of this school


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Posted November 8, 2013

If your child has any challenges in learning I would highly advise you not attend this school. They punish children who struggle with Academic Probation which means the student cannot attend school dances, or any football, basketball game or any social afterschool function. Also, your child is called up in front of the class to line up and go to a special room during recretion time each day for a study hall time inwhich no assistance is offered. This method is very damaging to the students self-esteem. My daughter has been teased by the other students about her grades because its a known fact due to the staff that she struggles in math. My two years at Cutherbertson Middle has been a nightmare and has played havoc on my daughters self-esteem. If your child is perfect and bright this is the school for you so you can help them keep their status to look good. They are failures at assisting students who struggle in any subject instead they take the easy way out and just punish them for what they cannot help.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 27, 2013

Regarding a comment by a parent pertaining to bullying, I am shocked with this comment. IF bullying exists, then I feel quite sure the administration is not aware of it and the student/parent involved need to have an immeditae conference with the principal and guidance counselors.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 27, 2013

Upon frequest visits to the school, I always view the students as very well behaved, friendly and on task. Teachers are outstanding and staff works together as one big family with the success of their students as a number one priority.


Posted August 27, 2013

I think Cuthbertson is a great School. Both of my children go there and the teacher to child ratio is better than a lot of other schools around the same area. The School has great pride and keeps moving forward.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2013

The total school environment is very organized. This includes cleanliness of the building, cafeteria management, school grounds and mainly all the classrooms. The Principal is on "top" of any and all issues which arise. There seem to be no discipline problems. Each child appears to be there to learn and participate in the many sports and extra curricular activities offered. It would be great if each parent would participate in the Go For The Gold which is simply donating $50, $75, $100 or ANY amount, so the school could have 100% participation for each and every student. It's a one time contribution. Giving school a 4 star rating because of the lack of more participation by parents.


Posted May 19, 2013

Most teachers are wonderful. Some seem very overwhelmed and unorganized. Too many practice tests for EOG start in April and seems like learning stops when practice tests and busy work for tests start. Volunteering has nothing to do with it - you can volunteer for school activities, fundraisers but not to help teachers with overwhelmed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 9, 2013

For a school where the average teacher has 90 students assigned, it is well run. However, because of high student teacher ratios, there are problems with teachers being able to communicate expectations to parents. Websites are often outdated or incomplete. Students must be able to self manage in order to excel. If your child doesn't have that maturity yet, good chance they may struggle and not perform to expectations. The teachers for the most part so far have been excellent. The bad apple can make it very tough on a student and school should identify these more quickly and weed them out.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 5, 2013

We moved here recently from the Raleigh, NC area and I have a daughter with autism attending this school. So far, she has had an amazing experience! The administration and teachers are very sensitive to her individual needs and have been able to provide the support she needs. She loves going to school and I see a confidence in her that I have never seen before. She has been successfully attending Art and PE with typical children and she is given the choice to eat lunch in her self contained class or the cafeteria; usually she choose the cafeteria! She has recently started riding the bus to school per her request. Her teacher shared with me that he feels tremendous support from the administration, which is a real challenge at times. Her teacher is a grandparent of a child with special needs and he "gets it". Thank you Cuthbertson for helping my daughter reach her potential!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 18, 2012

Great school, they really push the kids, and have a helpful staff. The school is clean, and new.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 6, 2012

Cuthbertson is Great. This is my daughters first year at Cuthbertson and she has loved it. We moved here last year from NY and it has been such a blessing to have teacher and a principle that listen. Go Cavs
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 15, 2012

Very lazy on the bullying issue, not to mention the teachers that give no warnings or awareness on grades.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

399 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

399 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

389 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

389 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

397 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

398 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
90%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

396 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students73%
Female71%
Male75%
Black66%
Asiann/a
Hispanic61%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White75%
Economically disadvantaged41%
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilities14%
Non-disabled students77%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English74%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students76%
Female74%
Male78%
Black61%
Asiann/a
Hispanic48%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Economically disadvantaged45%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilities18%
Non-disabled students81%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English77%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant76%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students77%
Female78%
Male77%
Black48%
Asian-95%
Hispanic61%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Economically disadvantaged52%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilities12%
Non-disabled students82%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English78%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant77%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students73%
Female78%
Male70%
Black55%
Asian60%
Hispanic56%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Economically disadvantaged48%
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilities12%
Non-disabled students78%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English74%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students71%
Female70%
Male72%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanic53%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Economically disadvantaged44%
Not economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilities11%
Non-disabled students74%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English71%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant71%
Academically gifted-95%

Reading

All Students72%
Female82%
Male64%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanic47%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Economically disadvantaged44%
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilities11%
Non-disabled students75%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English72%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant72%
Academically gifted95%

Science

All Students81%
Female83%
Male79%
Black63%
Asiann/a
Hispanic69%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Economically disadvantaged52%
Not economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilities28%
Non-disabled students84%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English81%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant81%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

135 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
-95%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students-95%
Female-95%
Male-95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged-95%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students-95%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English-95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant-95%
Academically gifted-95%

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 81% 52%
Black 10% 26%
Hispanic 5% 14%
Asian 2% 3%
Two or more races 2% 4%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 13%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Librarian/media specialist(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Scott Sofsian
Fax number
  • (704) 243-1673

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Library
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Wrestling
Girls sports
  • Basketball

Arts & music

Music
  • Choir / Chorus
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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1520 Cuthbertson Road
Waxhaw, NC 28173
Website: Click here
Phone: (704) 296-0107

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