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GreatSchools Rating

Cape Fear Center For Inquiry

Charter | K-8 | 372 students

 
 

Living in Wilmington

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $100,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $760.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 6 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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34 reviews of this school


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Posted March 24, 2014

Most of the teachers go above and beyond for the kids. The Ec dept is an awesome group who work really hard to make sure the kids get what they need while still being productive in a regular setting. The administration seems to care more about being a social butterfly than ensuring the safety of the kids. Often there are no crossing guards in the mornings for walkers. Rules are not always followed or enforced. I rate it a 3 due to many safety issues and administration's lack of concern about it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 26, 2013

Cape fear center for Inquiry has been an amazing learning environment for you three children. The each have a love for learning that I would never have imagined. We are bless to have such general Ed teachers and EC teachers are suburb and the teachers assistants are qualified teachers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 15, 2013

CFCI is hands down the best choice I could have ever made for my child. The staff are caring and understanding of each child which makes them more like family. Parent involvement is greatly encouraged and often happens without teachers even asking! Great community and the best students. Teachers who instill confidence, compassion, and intelligence of the children here are what make CFCI flourish!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 3, 2013

We transferred our daughter via lottery selection from a Title one public school in the 2nd grade last year. She is now in 3rd grade at CFCI. It has been the BEST decision we have made towards her education. She went from being just BARELY at grade level to above grade level in just the 2 years she has been there. She continues to improve everyday. The teachers are AWESOME!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 3, 2013

We tried to get into this school since before Kindergarten, because the reputation in our community is outstanding. We finally were able to "win" the lottery for first grade, and have been here 2 years. The progress my daughter has made is amazing. I cannot believe how she reads, is able to compute math problems in her head, and relate to her peers with kindness and caring. The director and teachers are outstanding and always available. This free, public school is one thousand times better than our most expensive private school in the area - I am so thankful we are able to attend. I know we are setting our child up to be a wonderful scholar and lifelong researcher and learner!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 3, 2013

The social curriculum and wonderful community is what keeps us at CFCI. The teachers have much more freedom at this school to implement the academic curriculum which can be wonderful or a detriment depending on the teacher. The students keep the same teacher for two years until 6th grade. This was wonderful for K-1 but I think the kids could benefit from switching teachers every year after that. The small class sizes and no cafeteria are a plus!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 10, 2013

I love this school!! Both of my children are students here. The sense of community and students, parents, and very importantly teachers are wonderful. In our so far 9 years with CFCI there have been NO major complaints that I as a parent have had, and the minor ones were addressed, resolutions to problems actually occur here. If you are looking for a school with a strong sense of community and the best teaching programs in our area, this is it (for us, anyway).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 22, 2012

This school has done an excellent job of creating a nurturing cozy environment while also challenging students to think independently. Test scores are fantastic here despite the fact that they do not "teach to the test". There are no textbooks and there is very little homework, but students here are prepared in ways that are rivaled only by the two best private schools in town. The social curriculum emphasized over the first 6 weeks creates a respectful and cooperative bully-free environment, perhaps aided by the fact that all of the children at CFCI are there by choice. It lacks the large sports facilities of other public schools, but it does have a gym for PE and band performances. There is also first rate support for "exceptional" children, i.e. kids with ADD or other similar issues. This is essentially a private school experience without the expense.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 8, 2012

This school is amazing! Every child is cared for, and the kids are so nice. The classes are small, so the teacher can really concentrate on each child's learning. The teachers are kind, and know how to teach the fun way. It's a little advanced in learning, but both my children (on now in 10th, and one in 6th) were able to catch right up. I definitely recommend this school to everyone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2010

I love that my children are valued as individuals & that teachers are able to have the freedom to bring out the best in the kids!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 21, 2010

I love the inquiry based way of learning, my children are thriving there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 6, 2009

Cape Fear Center for Inquiry has been a wonderfully positive experience for our family. Smaller class sizes, constant communication between teachers and families, achievable goals, and a learning environment where kids can fully explore the topics that interest them all combine to make this a school that I would highly recommend to anyone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2009

Why my family loves CFCI ... The small class sizes allow for more individualized teaching/learning; students are taught to think critically and learn through inquiry (ask questions and research the answers); all students participate in Spanish, art, PE and music; the social environment is one of team work and kindness; and the teachers and staff are incredibly devoted to their students!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2009

The classroom sizes are small so individual attention can be provided and kids are able to learn at their own pace while staying within the curriculum standards. We have several 'specials' classes - art, spanish, music, computers - for which I'm very thankful in these days of budget cuts.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2009

The Cape Fear Center for Inquiry does a wonderful job at keeping children interested in learning!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2009

Cape Fear Center for Inquiry nurtures and develops kids' interest in learning and wanting to know more. The school turns out responsible, considerate and knowledgeable young adults.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2009

Cape Fear Center for Inquiry is the best school ever! Inquiry based, hands-on learning helps our students succeed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 7, 2009

My child attended CFCI for the first year 2008-2009.High marks for the safe and respectful atmosphere that my child experienced. There is no tolerance for fighting, cursing, drug use, gang activity, or other adverse environmental hazards found in any other school in the NH Co. We were previously being forced (by districting away from our neighborhood) thanks to the NHCO school board to a school with a myriad of social problems including administration and teachers who were unable or unwilling to gain control of the environment and looked the other way most of the time. It has been a true blessing that we found CFCI. It is important to be vigilant with assessing your child's educational progress because there is a large amount of automony for students. Your child can be successful at CFCI with guidance from home and CFCI. Even without after school sports or cafeteria...this school makes the grade!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 16, 2009

I am a CFCI middle school student in the 8th grade this year. I would stongly recommend it to anybody. The nurturing environment here is one that you will not find at other schools. We have a new director this year at CFCI, and a lot of restructuring going into place this year. Our new director is a wonderful man and can only take CFCI upward from here. As for special needs students, they get just as much treatment as anybody else, with our own EC staff and counselor. I love CFCI, the teachers and kids included. This really is the best kept secret of NHC public schools.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 24, 2008

This school has a great mission and vision. The teachers have a great deal of autonomy and since technically they report to the board and not to the director, there hasn't always been oversight and correction if they stray from the philosophy and expectations of the school. Most teachers are great and as a team work well in this flat structure. The ones who don't do well though, (usually those with less experience or buy-in to the philosophy) cause problems for the rest. Policies do little if there is no one to govern them. Changes are underway for 2008-9, including changes in leadership and and more curriculum support. If CFCI sticks to its mission except making it even stronger and more consistent, by setting clear expectations and non-negotiables and finding ways to back it up, it can easily become the best school in the county.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
87%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
91%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
92%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
83%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students50%
Female45%
Male55%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White51%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students58%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English50%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students60%
Female50%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White62%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged60%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students67%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant60%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students61%
Female50%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White60%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students65%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English61%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant61%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students66%
Female50%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White65%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students73%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English66%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant66%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students52%
Female55%
Male50%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White60%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilities40%
Non-disabled students56%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English52%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant52%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students68%
Female68%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilities50%
Non-disabled students74%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students66%
Female68%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilities50%
Non-disabled students71%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English66%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant66%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students68%
Female65%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students76%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students80%
Female83%
Male76%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students87%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English80%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant80%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students84%
Female82%
Male86%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students85%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English84%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant84%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students72%
Female77%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students73%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English72%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant72%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students44%
Female50%
Male39%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White49%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged45%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students47%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English44%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant44%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students70%
Female80%
Male61%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students74%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English70%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant70%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students74%
Female75%
Male74%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students79%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English74%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant74%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

20 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students85%
Female91%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students85%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English85%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant85%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 87% 52%
Black 4% 26%
Hispanic 4% 14%
Two or more races 4% 4%
Asian 1% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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2525 Wonder Way
Wilmington, NC 28401
Website: Click here
Phone: (910) 362-0000

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