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GreatSchools Rating

Sallie B Howard School

Charter | K-8 | 852 students

Sallie B. Howard School is best known for there Arts and Humanities.
 
 

 
 

Living in Wilson

Situated in a small town neighborhood. The median home value is $86,500. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $738.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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17 reviews of this school


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Posted March 22, 2014

This is the worst school I have ever had any association with .The administration is poor and the school is disorganized. Everything is done in an unprofessional manner.There is a high staff turnover every year .Teachers are not shown any respect.Their nurtured heart discipline measure is a big failure.Lots of state and federal guidelines and laws are not met or followed.They employ large numbers of foreign teachers who stay because they dont have a choice.Some of them are employed without proper documentation until their documentation is process and told they are going to be paid upon receiving their paperwork but are never paid.Some work for at least three months and were never reimbursed.Free labor.I would not recommend this school to anyone and hope their illegal activities will be addressed by the proper authorities.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 17, 2014

Sallie B Howard School is an excellent school, especially when it is compared to the other schools in this area. They truly foster each child and their learning capabilities, and are open to parents being a part of the learning process. I see a couple of parents complaining about the school, but I have never seen staff be anything but professional with students, parents and each other. As for the homework load, it depends on the teacher that the student has, my daughter has been going since Kindergarten, and her homework load varied. But, she has maintained a A or A/B honor roll status since her first day of school. There are some children that do have behavioral issues, but in reality, all schools have this problem, not just Sallie B Howard. Many parents love to participate in the events that the school has and I wish it went higher than 8th grade. Overall, this school is wonderful,especially when compared to other local schools, and I have recommended parents send their kids to this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 17, 2013

This is the worst school that I have ever had the displeasure of allowing my child to attend. There are plenty of resources but a severe lack of professionalism from a lot of the staff. Its a very big school and looks great but its just an illusion. There was physical bullying and inappropriate language within the classrooms which I spoke to my child's teachers and even the principal about, yet nothing was done. Hardly any homework was given when my child attended, either. If you care about your child's education and well being, DO NOT send them to that school! Its a complete bait and switch routine so don't fall for it. There are too many kids with behavior issues that attend and it takes away from the kids who actually WANT to learn. Plus most of the teachers don't even try to motivate or challenge their students, academically speaking. I feel sorry for all the kids that are currently attending and for the parents who are completely oblivious to what's actually occurring within the school. My child will never return to Sallie B. Howard.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 22, 2013

I would never ever enroll my child again in this school. There's a lot of discrimination. their so called "nurtured heart approach" has never been practiced by their PE teacher nor by their directress,, such a shame.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 30, 2013

We love SBH we are from NY and this is the kind of school and teaching we are use to. The teachers are on point and the staff is so helpful. If you don't know anything about SBH except what you hear see for yourself and I am sure you will enroll your child .
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 2, 2007

The way the school integrate the arts is just simply the most amazing thing I have every seen a school do.


Posted July 27, 2007

I am a former teacher at Sallie B Howard. I had to leave because my husband's job relocated us. It was one of the best teaching experiences I have ever had. Resources were plentiful and the arts are outstanding. I do not agree with the comments that the school laocks consistent discipline . . . I was always supported. Go Eagles!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 9, 2007

The school lacks inconsistency in discipline and I have witness the director becoming irate with staff and students. Their are constant new teachers entering Sallie B. Howard and some classrooms have three and four teachers within one school year. School is highly unorganized and fail to support all students and staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 9, 2007

I do not understand why people are afraid to speak the truth. Sallie B. Howard is an excellent idea but Sallie B. Howard lacks the proper direction and administrative support of their staff. Excellent teachers have been let go over their ten years of existence. This past year staff was let go after Sallie B. Howard scores improved for the first time in almost three years. I personally believe you build on that not eliminate your source of improvement. Children establish teacher-student relationships and students look forward and anticipate teachers for their next school year. However, students have to learn to establish new teacher-student relationships each year before they are willing to learn from another teacher. This creates instability in student's learning environment and staff work environment.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted July 8, 2007

I am a former teacher of the Sallie B. Howard Charter School. I am so happy to read the wonderful reviews that are here. I can truly say that the year I taught at Sallie B. Howard was one that I will always fondly remember. I was allowed to be as innovative and creative as I wanted to be. My students all achieved outstanding growth on the EOG tests. Keep up the good work, Dr. Woodard and staff.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 9, 2006

Sallie B. Howard was a God-sent school for my children. They are really a second chance school after all. My family also support Dr. Joanne Woodard to the upmost. Keep up the good work Sallie B. Howard! T. Coley
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 1, 2006

Very good school best school in the states. Keep it up!
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 2, 2004

I am also a parent of a happy Sallie B Howard School throughout my son 2 years their not only have he learned alot I learned alot just as well.The school is so culturally diverse that I encourage alot of parents to send there kids there.I enjoy the whole learning process,and the arts.I think that alot of schools should recommend the arts as extra classes,it gives kids a chance of believing and a chance to dream a little bit more. Thanks Alisha Pate
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 18, 2004

Sallie B. Howard School of Arts and Education in an excellent school. More schools should be under the policies of Sallie B. Howard in the areas of discipline, education and teaching our children of the importance of the world of art. My only wish is that I would love for the school to be from K - 12th grade. The students who leave Sallie B. Howard go on to regular public school where the students are far more advanced in their studies than their peers. Each student who has graduated from Sallie B. Howard wish that they were still that environment. Sallie B. Howard is once again a excellent school and if I had my way I would give this school ten stars.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 12, 2004

I love this school! The teachers really care about their students. My son attends there now & enjoys school. They always encourage parents to be envolved. I have helped in the class room and it is a wonderful experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 22, 2004

Excellent school! I had one child to attend and have only great things to say about the school from the curriculm to the teacher involvement with students and parents. The arts programs are wonderful. A great alternative to a superb academic education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 25, 2003

I believe that this school has high expectations for it's students and is a wonderful school. They strive in helping students meet goals. I had two of my own children enrolled here at this school and enjoyed having them there as much as they enjoyed being there! I regret having to move away but if I ever returned back to NC I would certainly enroll my children at this school again!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
76%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

81 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
56%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
13%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
74%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
24%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
59%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

93 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
23%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
79%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

93 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
19%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
61%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

93 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
59%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
17%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
69%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

77 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
22%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
63%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
79%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

62 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

62 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
55%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

62 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
65%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students32%
Female26%
Male40%
Black30%
Asiann/a
Hispanic38%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged32%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students34%
Limited English proficiency20%
Proficient in English35%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant32%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students30%
Female26%
Male34%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanic19%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students32%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English36%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant30%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students13%
Female13%
Male13%
Black12%
Asiann/a
Hispanic8%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged11%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students13%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English13%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant13%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students24%
Female29%
Male18%
Black28%
Asiann/a
Hispanic8%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged21%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students26%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English26%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant24%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students23%
Female15%
Male32%
Black17%
Asiann/a
Hispanic36%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities17%
Non-disabled students24%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English23%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant23%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students19%
Female15%
Male24%
Black16%
Asiann/a
Hispanic27%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged19%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities8%
Non-disabled students21%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English20%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant19%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students29%
Female25%
Male34%
Black20%
Asiann/a
Hispanic55%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities8%
Non-disabled students32%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English29%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant29%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students17%
Female18%
Male16%
Black6%
Asiann/a
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged14%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students19%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English18%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant17%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students22%
Female31%
Male13%
Black15%
Asiann/a
Hispanic35%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged21%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students25%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English24%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant22%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students28%
Female25%
Male32%
Black22%
Asiann/a
Hispanic36%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged25%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students32%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English28%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant28%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students32%
Female33%
Male32%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanic27%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged28%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students36%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English36%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant32%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students27%
Female21%
Male39%
Black16%
Asiann/a
Hispanic56%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students31%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English27%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant27%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students26%
Female21%
Male35%
Black25%
Asiann/a
Hispanic25%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged25%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities9%
Non-disabled students29%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English29%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant26%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students74%
Female69%
Male83%
Black75%
Asiann/a
Hispanic69%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged73%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities18%
Non-disabled students86%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English76%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant74%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 67% 26%
Hispanic 29% 14%
Two or more races 2% 4%
White 2% 52%
American Indian 0% 1%
Asian 0% 3%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 94%N/A50%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Computer specialist(s)
Dance teacher(s)
ELL/ESL Coordinator
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
School social worker/counselors(s)
Special education coordinator
Speech and language therapist(s)
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Tutor(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Specific learning disabilities
  • Speech and language impairments
Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Staff resources available to students
  • Computer specialist(s)
School facilities
  • Computer lab
  • Science lab

Arts & music

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Arts (all)
  • Performing arts
  • Visual arts
Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Dance teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
Visual arts
  • Design
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Photography
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Instrumental music lessons
Performing and written arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Computer animation
  • Graphics
  • Technical design and production
  • Video / Film production
Clubs
  • Yearbook

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Dance teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Gym
School leaders can update this information here.

School basics

School Leader's name
  • JoAnne Woodard
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Phone
Special schedule
  • Year-round
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (252) 293-4151

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Core knowledge
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Arts (all)
  • Humanities
  • Performing arts
  • Visual arts
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • No
Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Specific learning disabilities
  • Speech and language impairments
Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • Dance teacher(s)
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
  • Tutor(s)
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
  • Tutoring
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Audiovisual aids
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Computer lab
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
  • Playground
  • Science lab
School leaders can update this information here.

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross country
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Design
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Photography
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Instrumental music lessons
Performing arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Computer animation
  • Graphics
  • Technical design and production
  • Video / Film production

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Yearbook
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Uniforms
Bullying policy
  • This school has a bullying and/or cyber bullying policy in place.
Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Volunteer in the classroom
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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What are your chances?

Students typically come from these schools
Margaret Hearn Elementary
Barnes Elementary
Forest Hills Middle School

Planning ahead

Students typically attend these schools after graduating
Fike High School
Beddingfield High School
James B. Hunt High School
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

1004 Herring Ave
Wilson, NC 27893
Website: Click here
Phone: (252) 293-4150

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