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Meadowlark Middle

Public | 6-8 | 1085 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 5 ratings

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27 reviews of this school


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Posted January 15, 2014

This school is awful, terrible, horrible, horrendous and dreadful. Stay away, go to a different school if you can. This school has gone downhill since Principal Mcaninch left.


Posted October 21, 2012

Terrible school, Very poor leadership. My little Tommy and Timothy suffered so much here. Very cliquey, poor staffing as well. My sweet little Timothy was bullied over his so called larger frame. Absalutly unacceptable! This school is terrible.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 13, 2011

I believe Mr. Mac is biased toward the popular people. The teachers pick and choose their favorites. Plus everyone at this school is FAKE. Never send your child to this school. Unless your a cheerleader or a jock you will regret it.


Posted October 13, 2011

Good school....School of Excellence for a good reason. Great parent involvement and teachers seem to care.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 14, 2011

I also wrote last year on my sons experience and this website did not post it. So Don't Put Your Children In This School!!! Yes there are preferences, racials comments from children, bullying, and if you fight back (two wrongs don't make it right" n quote) you get detention. Yes there is a lot of homework to be done. Which we didn't mind. & we also were mailed a letter from the NC State mind regarding Meadowlark Scoring LOW in math. Yes you are ignored if you complain. SOOOOOO GOOD LUCK!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 13, 2011

This school is terrible. They dont want to hear it when there is a problem. Some children there have major behavior problems and they dont protect the innocent kids from not getting hurt. When you try to address anything with them no one wants to deal with you. As far as the teachers go there is only one there that behaves like an angry child and wonders why everyone wants to drop his class. I would not recommend this school to anyone. It just has way to many problems and they will not help you keep your child's head above water.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 5, 2011

I am currently serving overseas and in almost every call home I hear hopelessness in both my wife and child. Websites are seldom updated, teachers NEVER communicate with parents. Neither teachers nor staff members display any sense, common or otherwise. Case in point, my son was out for an entire week with diarrhea and went back to school the following week still suffering from bouts of the illness; his teacher would not let him go to the bathroom because school policy dictates that a doctor's note is required for a student to leave class. Idiocy! My 12 year-old had to call his mother, who had to leave work, to come to school so that she could call the doctor and have him fax a letter to the school. Students that miss any days for any reason are required to complete all school work before returning to school (hence, the website). My son simply could not complete the massive amount of work that the school required of him. Since the school was trying to make up for the spate of snow days it had recently been forced to absorb there was an ungodly amount of work to do. (Cont.)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 2, 2010

I go to this school right now and it is awsome
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 22, 2010

The teachers are borderline scary. One has repeatedly crossed lines of racial issues...saying black power and such in class to students. My child has been a target for certain teachers. Bullying and fighting is just out of hand and nothing is done. Teachers act like kids. Homework and classwork is rushed through and not clearly explained. Problems are almost daily. I have another child starting middle next year and we have decided neither will ever return to this school. Complaints go unnoticed or they act like you are bothering them. Teacher make comments about the kids in front of them and it hurts feelings of child. I would just say the WSFC system needs to step in. If I am not mistaken they have had 3 principals in less than 6 years.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 31, 2010

This school has done a poor job of helping it's students through their tween years. Quite often, the teachers and administration do nothing to aid their students when they are the victim of verbal bullying. That sets the stage for an awkward environment.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 30, 2009

Great environment & place to learn
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 4, 2009

I have to disagree with a few of the comments below. It has nothing to do with race, finances or 'clicks'...it is just a bad school. We are upper middle class family, white and our child is extremely popular and we have had to worse years at this school. Teachers act like the students, disrespectful and rude. Homework is never clear nor is the website every updated. The administration is so bad it isn't funny. My child has been picked on and they do absolutely nothing. They question the students when things happen and then they tell the other students who told on them which starts more fights. I could go on for hours about the quality of this school bottom line it needs revamping.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 18, 2009

Meadowlark Middle School is quite simple. Bad parent/teacher interaction. If you're not rich and 'pretty' you will probably have trouble fitting in. Teachers give multiple second chances and usually don't stand by their word. I think the coursework is average, but could be much better. Some students don't care about academics. In one of the classes there was one student on the honor roll. Some students are quite rude, but I suppose that is expected of pre-teens sometimes. I would say my experience was okay, but could have been much better.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 17, 2009

i am a student at this school and i love it, it is the best i have ever been too
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 5, 2009

I hate to say that my experiences at Meadowlark Middle school were not all that great. Considering I was only there for a couple of months, the teachers paid no interest in catching me up with the other students or even offering me extra help after school. The other students are also not very friendly. Like all the other reviews, if you do not fit the mold then you won't fit in. It is either you are rich and white, or don't even bother going.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 30, 2009

Meadowlark is a great school. There students are good and there teachers are excallent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 21, 2008

I Think Meadowlark is a wonderful school. I have worked closely with all of my child's teachers and have seen things many other parents have not. Meadowlark has many issues, including overcrowding (sometimes 40 students per class!), and a slue of parents that don't hold their child accountable. This only adds to the daily stress of the teachers and staff. I believe we are pointing fingers in the wrong direction. The parents in our community need to hold their child accountable and volunteer within their child's team (field trip, classroom, office.) and stop putting so much emphasis on pop warner, and other social climbing activities. Also, we need to hold the school board and Dr. Martin more accountable. Why do we have so many kids per classroom? Why do they put so much emphasis on state testing? I challenge every parent to educate yourself by volunteering and attending school board meetings.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 13, 2008

It is hard to thoroughly describe the frustration I have experienced having a child at this school. Not only is the education unacceptable, the environment is very unfriendly towards parents if there is any questioning of the teachers or inquiry about disciplinary actions. My child was often harassed by other students. My child was belittled by teachers - I personally heard this. Web pages that give class assignments, work information, etc. were often not updated by teachers - yet communication with teachers was practically impossible. Grade reports were often incorrect. There is an overall unwillingness on the part of the administration to hold teachers accountable for low quality work. Anything that might require 'extra' work is avoided. There have been a few good individual teachers - but overall not enough to mitigate the poor environment or to prepare students well for high school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 12, 2008

After attending WSFC middle school more than 20 yrs ago I returned to the WS area with my family and 2 kids ( 8th grader) & (5th grader) in Aug 2007. We selected Meadowlark Middle for my daughter based on the rating of the school. My daughter left the Union County System outside Charlotte NC , which had similar rating. We found out that the rating dont make the school. My daughter was an A/B honor roll student, Duke TIP student and Beta club memeber as she left the Union County School. Once at Meadowlark we found that she was not Recognized for her accomplishments nor woould the school's administration consider her for the equal, Nat. Jr Honor Society. They gave excuses Lastly, Diversity is not in the School or the system. As a result we elected to return to Union County for her High School Yr. We don't recommend Meadowlark
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 28, 2008

The education that is being give to students at Meadowlark is unacceptable. My daughter has gone there 3 years and she is definitely not ready for high school. They talk 'responsibility' but do not hold the students responsible. They teach the student that they will always get a second chance and are afraid to fail anyone. The teachers give lip service to responding, the web site to help me keep up with homework is typically not kept up to date by any teacher during the last 3 years, and the email of grades from the computer system that is sent out same day as the paperwork comes home is often incomplete or missing reports (the report due today never came through). The whole school talks a good game but the students are not being prepared for being successful in school or life. The End of Grade testing seems their only focus.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

376 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

376 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

368 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

368 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

336 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

336 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
88%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

336 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students55%
Female52%
Male58%
Black28%
Asian75%
Hispanic37%
Multiracial46%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White60%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilities14%
Non-disabled students59%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English55%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant55%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students68%
Female69%
Male66%
Black42%
Asian75%
Hispanic44%
Multiracial64%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Economically disadvantaged42%
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilities25%
Non-disabled students72%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English69%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students50%
Female51%
Male48%
Black34%
Asian69%
Hispanic48%
Multiracial57%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White50%
Economically disadvantaged30%
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilities19%
Non-disabled students52%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English50%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Academically gifted92%

Reading

All Students69%
Female71%
Male66%
Black55%
Asian88%
Hispanic63%
Multiracial86%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Economically disadvantaged49%
Not economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilities19%
Non-disabled students73%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English70%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant69%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students45%
Female45%
Male45%
Black12%
Asian67%
Hispanic35%
Multiracial18%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White50%
Economically disadvantaged30%
Not economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disabilities17%
Non-disabled students48%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English45%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant45%
Academically gifted95%

Reading

All Students64%
Female66%
Male63%
Black31%
Asian50%
Hispanic62%
Multiracial55%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Economically disadvantaged45%
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilities27%
Non-disabled students68%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English65%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant64%
Academically gifted-95%

Science

All Students89%
Female86%
Male92%
Black73%
Asian92%
Hispanic83%
Multiracial73%
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Economically disadvantaged77%
Not economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilities70%
Non-disabled students91%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English89%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant89%
Academically gifted-95%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

174 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
>95%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students80%
Female75%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic67%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Economically disadvantaged84%
Not economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students79%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English80%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant80%
Academically gifted95%

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 75% 52%
Black 10% 26%
Hispanic 7% 14%
Asian 4% 3%
Two or more races 4% 4%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 23%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Librarian/media specialist(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Arts & music

School facilities
  • Art room
Visual arts
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Joseph D. Hearl
Fax number
  • (336) 922-1745

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Library
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Volleyball
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Upcoming Events

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301 Meadowlark Drive
Winston-Salem, NC 27106
Website: Click here
Phone: (336) 922-1730

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