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GreatSchools Rating

The Arts Based School

Charter | K-7 | 369 students

 
 

Living in Winston-Salem

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $118,300. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $580.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 6 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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32 reviews of this school


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Posted October 24, 2013

This school rocks!!!!!! Most if the teachers that I have encountered were great and will work with you in order to help achieve expectations that your child as well as yourself are working towards. Very family oriented. This school is like no other.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 18, 2013

The Arts Based School is an innovative, creative environment that teaches kids the basics of education and so much more. As a parent at this school for 7 years, I've seen my children blossom into creative critical thinkers who obsessively immerse themselves in the educational task at hand. I couldn't ask for a more stimulating, enriching environment to lay the foundation for my children's educational future.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 10, 2013

I believe this school operates by telling people that they run their school based on the arts. I can honestly say that I believe that is just a way for them to hide their lack-luster education. I had my child in this school for a short period of time before switching them because of the way the principal deals with issues, it's quite frustrating. Along with that the school has hardly any other arts classes than other schools and forced children to take dance without even offering PE which is what my child wished he could take. All in all, very disappointing
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 27, 2013

My child's fourth grade teacher told me in our last conference that he would never be a 4.0, straight A student and that was ok!!! Now I have a very smart but lazy child that needs to be pushed to give the extra effort. Accepting the minimum is absolutely unacceptable! Outraged Parent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 15, 2013

We adore The Arts Based School. We have two children there and have watched them both blossom emotionally and academically in this wonderful, unique and innovative learning environment. The teachers are amazing, and you couldn't ask for a more engaged, capable or caring principal and staff. There is a true sense of community among ABS families as well that makes it such a special place. My advice to anyone who is wanting something more for their child than teaching to the test, being stressed about unending, pointless homework or anxiety over being timed in math drills is to TAKE A TOUR of ABS (call 748-4116 for an appt. the tours are given each Thursday morning). You really will be amazed at their curriculum and what this school offers its students!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 13, 2013

Having started in the traditional school system, I greatly appreciate the vast differences in the way The Arts Based School approaches teaching. My once spirited, bright, confident child was miserable in a traditional setting where the curriculum was taught primarily through "one size fits all" lectures. ABS believes in actively engaging each child in the learning process and truly teaching the Standard Course of Study through the arts. Visual arts, music, dance, drama - all are part of daily life at ABS! Not only are the children engaged in what they are learning - they are loving it and ultimately retaining it. There is a reason we all learned the ABCs with a song - you never forget it! The administration and teaching staff are the most dedicated, inspiring and caring people I have ever encountered in education. The sense of community and parental involvement at ABS is amazing. Both of my children have excelled in their time at ABS and we're so thrilled we're expanding to a K-8 school. My children feel valued, engaged, challenged and safe. It truly is the greatest school you could ever hope for.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 16, 2012

Couldn't be happier with the experience my two daughters are having at ABES. Respectful, kind teachers allow each kid to advance in a supportive environment. My kids are not just learning the [state-mandated] curriculum, but are also finding out how to approach problems in innovative ways--skills sorely lacking in the standard institutionalized system. Highly recommended for any family that wants to prepare their kids for the challenges of the 21st century.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 17, 2010

As a former teacher, I made a specific list of things that I wanted from my kindergartner son's school experience. An academically challenging, child centered environment, kind teachers who spoke to children in respectful ways, adequate time to be physically active, meaningful learning opportunities, a healthy nutrition policy, and heavy parental involvement. I had heard opinions in the community that ABES was a school filled with children with behavioral problems who couldn't cope it in regular schools. That is not our experience. ABES met and exceeded all of my desires for a school for my son. They have academically challenged my child (reading on a 2nd grade level in kindergarten). It is an emotionally safe environment, where children feel free to fail and succeed and try new things. Real learning takes place and an enthusiasm for knowledge and growth is ever present. The work that I see the students produce at ABES is a grade level above what the students at my School of Excellence could produce. They just aren't factory model taught to fill in bubbles. The leadership at ABES is incredible. They are supportive of the teachers and students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 26, 2010

My child is a very in-the-box thinker. ABES has provided him with the structure, encouragement and opportunity to allow his box to get significantly bigger. :) He is willing to take chances when he didn't used to trust himself, expand himself artistically, and his academics are challenging him. He began first grade reading on grade level and is finishing first grade reading on a 3-4 grade level. I am so excited to see him continue on this path and watch him grow and expand in his academics, confidence, and artistic knowledge and comfort.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 2, 2009

We have two children at ABES and 'get' their academic approach. It is a very unique but well researched and thought out appraoch to teaching children. As an educator myself, it is very important to us that our children be great learners. This means not correctly filling in a blank but critically thinking about a subject and coming up with well thought out answers. While this appraoch is more cumbersome and a much longer process, the children who are educated this way are much more successful in all other endeavors. This environment requires more self-control and more focus than a regular school setting. The children are taught how to solve their own relationship issues with kindness and respect. One of my children is a great student who would succeed in just about any environment. My other student is a very academically gifted student who is given so many individualized opportunities.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 22, 2009

We have been very disappointed with the curriculum this year and have removed our child. We found the school lacking in academic structure, discipline, and especially leadership. This school is failing students academically and operates in DENIAL. The poor academic performance and structure is hiding behind the word ARTS. While many parents appreciate the style of the school, many of these families have faced discipline and performance issues with their children at other schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 21, 2009

My school is the best school in America because we have our children learn in different ways that help all kinds of learners achieve. We look for different avenues to teach so that our kids are engaged and thinking deeply, while also covering the basics. Our children are happy and treated as full partners in their education.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted October 21, 2009

The teachers are so devoted, they spend much of their own money always bettering themselves as individuals in well in addition to anything required by the state, so as to be free, clear and available to be with the children 100% and not any other agenda other than truly serving the children's needs, intellectual as well as human needs on every level! They treat the kids as well as they would treat their own...and if and when something is not working with the child's behavior, they look to see where they could make a difference, not just got to blame and justification. There is no sign of resignation or cynicism at that school whatsoever! The teachers continually deal with themselves to be fresh and ready...every minute!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 21, 2009

It is the most wonderful school to teach at and gives the children who attend such a wonderful appreciation for all that surrounds them and a feeling of confidence and success that will live with them forever!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted October 21, 2009

My wife loves teaching there and my son is a student and is learning so much and enjoys it ver much.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 21, 2009

A great school full of dedicated teachers and staff!


Posted October 5, 2009

I have two boys at this school and chose ABES specifically for my oldest, who is not ADHD but very active. He needed an environment that understood children. If you don't understand and relate to the child. If you have adult goals and deadlines (EOG's etc.) then you miss the point of education entirely. Who cares if you test well if in the real world you can't figure out why it is a bad idea to, for example, let a baby play with a plastic grocery bag? (true story btw) The staff at ABES consistantly place the education of the children in their care as top priority. What is more they concern themselves with an education in all areas (yes art has been proven to develop ALL areas of development). What other school can boast THAT??
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2009

No school in America has committed to, and uses, the arts to teach the standard course of study more than ABES. Every child receives music, dance, art and theater every week, while instructors integrate the arts into their teaching. Besides that, it's just a terrifically exciting place to be--and fun, too!


Posted September 22, 2008

I Love ArtsBased Elementary! One of my children graduated a few years ago and 2 of them still attend. I would reccomend Arts Based to any parent who is interested in an environment that foster's the whole childs learning expierience. I have found that my child is not just test savy or has the ability to recite what was just told to him. He can exspress without prejudice and his spirit is not crushed because of policies that prevent your child's freedom of expression. This is a great school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 5, 2008

My son has started his third year at Arts Based and it has been a wonderful experience! He is on the autism spectrum, and I have found everyoneto be extremely patient and accomodating. My son is definitely learning and I have been satisfied with his accomplishments and the school's. I do realize that their test scores are a little low, however, I look at the big pictures. EOG scores are not the end-all and be-all of everything. Because there is such a high ratio of children with learning disabilities, I think it is natural that test scores will be skewed. I don't think that is a reflection of the school but rather the individual child. One should take a look at the average test scores of learning disabled students in a traditional school and compare them to ABES.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 47% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 45% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
68%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 44% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 48% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
61%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 40% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
56%
Science

The state average for Science was 45% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
58%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students64%
Female65%
Male64%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilities20%
Non-disabled students74%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English64%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant64%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students68%
Female71%
Male64%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilities50%
Non-disabled students71%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English68%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students61%
Female60%
Male62%
Black47%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White68%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students65%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant61%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students61%
Female63%
Male58%
Black47%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students65%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English62%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant61%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students52%
Female47%
Male64%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students61%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English52%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant52%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students71%
Female70%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students82%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English71%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant71%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students63%
Female60%
Male69%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students71%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English63%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant63%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students50%
Female56%
Male40%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White56%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged59%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students58%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English50%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students71%
Female67%
Male80%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students75%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English71%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant71%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 62% 52%
Black 22% 26%
Two or more races 8% 4%
Hispanic 5% 14%
Asian 2% 3%
American Indian 0% 1%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 23%N/A50%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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1380 North Martin Luther King Junior Drive
Winston-Salem, NC 27101
Website: Click here
Phone: (336) 748-4116

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