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Philo-Hill Magnet Academy

Public | 6-8 | 501 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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7 reviews of this school


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Posted November 7, 2013

I too am a parent that has a daughter at Philo. When school first started , i was siting at a dentist appt. and an older lady just wanting to talk said hi, your son looks like he is very smart this was my 4 yr. old I said thank you, he is. Well the conversation went on and she asked where do your children go to school and i said Philo. As soon as i said that her demeanor changed. And she said i had a grandson there and plzz i ask of you to look out for your daughter, my grandson was a great student and when he entered there he did a complete u turn he went down hill. And of course i was worried but i thought i would give this school a try ... SO HERE I AM GIVING THIS SCHOOL THE WORST GRADE I CAN GIVE IT A 1 . NOT HAPPY MY DAUGHTER ALSO CHANGED AND I KNOW WHY IT'S BECAUSE OF PHILO !! PLEASE PARENTS LOOK AROUND IF YOU HAVE THE CHANCE DON'T DO WHAT I DID!! MY DAUGHTER IS MOVING SCHOOLS AS I AM TYPING THIS :)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 2, 2013

i agree with the parents i went to this school and was bullied non stop. i even got pushed down steps. a few adults there that were good but most was very bad. do not go to this school


Posted March 29, 2011

Who rates these schools? My son was in this school for two days and I pulled him out.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 30, 2010

The faculty and staff at PHILO MAGNET ACADEMY are working hard to give the students a rewarding educational experience. Now into the 4th year of the magnet program and the leadership of principal Hairston, the school has made a wonderful turnaround. The students are proud to know that they are part of a school that's been awarded by the district as showing the most growth for their math scores! This comes from motivated teachers and a hard working support staff. There are many more good things that are happening at Philo like the global monthly themes, Toyota Tapestry Grant for Science, technology enhanced classrooms, & the Chinese language program just to name a few.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted March 19, 2010

Philo is an really wonderful school. I absolutely respect every single one of their teachers and staff. most importantly, Ms.Kornegay . sHe is the best acclerated math teacher I have ever gotten to know.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 13, 2009

The staff at Philo has been put in a ridiculous situation by the district. The school has been deemed the designated ESL middle school for the district yet receives no additional support from Central Office. Despite an obvious agenda to get the school eventually shut down, the teachers and staff at Philo give their hearts and souls to the children they teach each and every day. Unlike a school like Jefferson Middle where students are already self-motivated, the staff at Philo works hard to bridge the gaps between race and socioeconomic status to really help and try to inspire its students who come from difficult backgrounds. Nowhere else in Forsyth County will you find real teachers in the trenches fighting for children that the district is intentionally trying to leave behind. For anyone who wants to see what a real teacher looks like, I implore them to visit Philo.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted April 3, 2008

I have a child at Philo and I am very disgusted and quite frankly disappointed in the teachings and the staff. Philo is horrible the staff is very unprofessional and they do not know how to respect the students. I beleive that they belittle and degrade the students because of the location of the school and the sterotyped of students that attend Philo. My child was incorrectly assisgned there and it has been a nightmare! My hats off to Dt Detrude/Barkley they are working on turning the school around and boosting the morale. Children need to know that respect begets respect. I don't feel this is shown by adults at Philo. I will continue to pray for these children at Philo. Because I am a voice for my child and for the other kids as well! They need to be encouraged as well. I challenge the staff to try that!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

165 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
11%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
50%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 46% in 2013.

166 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
10%

2012

 
 
39%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
40%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

173 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
8%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
61%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 48% in 2013.

173 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
12%

2012

 
 
42%

2011

 
 
27%

2010

 
 
35%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

163 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
11%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
79%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 41% in 2013.

164 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
9%

2012

 
 
32%

2011

 
 
39%

2010

 
 
32%
Science

The state average for Science was 59% in 2013.

163 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
37%

2010

 
 
26%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students11%
Female11%
Male11%
Black-5%
Asiann/a
Hispanic10%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged10%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students13%
Limited English proficiency9%
Proficient in English12%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant11%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students10%
Female9%
Male10%
Black10%
Asiann/a
Hispanic7%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged9%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students11%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English13%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant10%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students8%
Female-5%
Male12%
Black6%
Asiann/a
Hispanic10%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White-5%
Economically disadvantaged8%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students9%
Limited English proficiency6%
Proficient in English9%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant8%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students12%
Female13%
Male10%
Black10%
Asiann/a
Hispanic10%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White21%
Economically disadvantaged11%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students13%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English16%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant12%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Math

All Students11%
Female13%
Male9%
Black9%
Asiann/a
Hispanic9%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White27%
Economically disadvantaged12%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students14%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English15%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant11%
Academically giftedn/a

Reading

All Students9%
Female11%
Male8%
Black9%
Asiann/a
Hispanic9%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White9%
Economically disadvantaged10%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities-5%
Non-disabled students11%
Limited English proficiency-5%
Proficient in English13%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant9%
Academically giftedn/a

Science

All Students29%
Female31%
Male27%
Black22%
Asiann/a
Hispanic29%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White60%
Economically disadvantaged30%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilities6%
Non-disabled students35%
Limited English proficiency11%
Proficient in English36%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant29%
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Grade (EOG) tests to assess students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and grades 5 and 8 in science. The EOG is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. Students must pass the grade 8 EOG test in order to graduate from high school. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 36% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
>95%
Biology

The state average for Biology was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
English II

The state average for English II was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Algebra I

All Students36%
Female32%
Male43%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic35%
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged37%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled students36%
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in English36%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant36%
Academically giftedn/a

Biology

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a

English II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indiann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Non-disabled studentsn/a
Limited English proficiencyn/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2012-2013 North Carolina used End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess high school students in Algebra I, English II, and Biology. The EOC tests are standards-based, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of North Carolina. The goal is for all students to score at or above the proficient level on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, data for that group is not reported.

Source: North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 59% 14%
Black 29% 26%
White 7% 52%
Two or more races 4% 4%
American Indian 1% 1%
Asian 0% 3%
Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 100%N/A56%
Source: NCDPI, 2012-2013

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr Kenyatta Bennett
Fax number
  • (336) 771-4578

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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410 Haverhill Street
Winston-Salem, NC 27127
Website: Click here
Phone: (336) 703-4165

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