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GreatSchools Rating

Trillium

Charter | K-12 | 346 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 5 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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52 reviews of this school


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Posted May 23, 2014

We have a Kindergartner at Trillium and over the last 9 months we have been very happy with the academic rigor, education philosophy and general community feel at this school. The process of selecting a Kindergarten in the Portland Metro area was arduous. After evaluating private school and public school options (including charter, alternative and focus programs), we applied to Trillium as an option. After getting accepted, we still had lingering concerns -- was a K-12 school appropriate for our 5-yr old? Is the location and facility a safe environment? Will the Democratic/Constructivist education philosophy meet our standards for academic rigor? Is the environment too liberal for us? Our experience to date has been extremely positive. Our Kindergartner is excelling academically and socially. I believe the small class size, blended age groups (K-1 blend) and exceptional teachers are major contributing factors. We are also very pleased to see that the education philosophy goes beyond academics and teaches kids how to be good citizens. They are learning about conflict resolution, caring and respect. I believe that Trillium is arming my child with skills they need to be a good person.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 25, 2014

Trillium is a Portland Public School based around Democratic and Constructivist education and has been such a vibrant engaging place for my two boys. They are learning in an environment that values their voice, empowers them resolve conflict through mediation, and challenges them to keep asking questions.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 1, 2012

My children have been attending this school since 2004. One of my students has struggled there (but is now in a new grade level and will have a different teacher which I think was an aspect in his struggles), and the other has thrived. I think both of them are learning what they need to know to operate in the real world. They are both thoughtful, smart and well spoken. There is a great sense of community. Regarding the changes in the administration, there were a couple of very turbulent years, and some tough decisions had to be made, but now they are on solid staffing ground and I have confidence that the new director has the experience and leadership skills necessary to help the school reach its full potential fulfill and exceed its mission.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 21, 2012

I have been a parent of a student at Trillium for 7 years, and I highly recommend it for anyone who wants their children to learn problem solving, conflict resolution, and community involvement. It may not be the best choice for every child, but it certainly is for mine.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 20, 2011

Unfortunately, I cannot recommend this school to anyone. We spent a total of 5 years with this school and it was a disaster. I didn't realize how much of a disaster until I moved my eldest child out of the school and into a traditional public school. My daughter was horribly mistreated AND emotionally harmed by her last teacher at Trillium. My husband and I pulled her out of the school after an especially traumatic event. Unfortunately, the staff involved in the decision to suspend my child after the fact, never bothered to meet with us nor did they make any effort to resolve the situation. Had this occurred in a traditional school, this teachers would have been fired. My child entered her new school two full academic years behind, she could barely read or compute simple math problems and she had no knowledge of punctuation. She was referred for special ed testing and had a very severe learning disability, something all the teachers at Trillium failed to notice. My son had a great experience at Trillium. His teacher was amazing. Unfortunately, she was forced out by the new administration. Before you decide to send your child to Trillium, attend a Board Meeting.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 1, 2011

Trillium was once a great place where the kids were the main focus. The new administration systematically forced out the founders of the school. Most staff members who started with the school have been let go or have quit. The new administration has not one bit of experience in running a school and would rather decorate her office then buy books for kids. Most programs that made trillium unique are being phased out. Such as garden and traveling. The new administration would rather the school be filled with upper middle class white children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 31, 2011

This school has seriously taken a turn for the worst. They used to care about the students. Now they care about making the administration look good. I wish that it was the same place that I loved once, but it just is not. It is a twisted place that needs to get it's head back on straight.


Posted May 18, 2011

As a parent of both current and former Trillium students I must express an extreme disappointment with the school as a whole. They profess to subscribe to a democratic process, but I have seen that fail on many occasions. There isn't continuity between classrooms and boundaries are almost nonexistent. While much energy is spent on community activities, there isn't enough focus on academics. Services for special needs students are hard to get. I spent 4 years trying to get extra help for one of my kids to no avail. In less than 3 weeks of dis-enrolling from Trillium and enrolling at our neighborhood school we were getting the remedial help that Trillium refused to provide. There is a complete lack of accountability from students to teachers to administrators. Family involvement is strong. Unfortunately the needs of the students and school can take second place to the beliefs of the parents. There is a core of dedicated staff and parents that are keeping the school afloat. The kindergarten program is phenomenal and I would recommend it to anyone, but beyond that I would advise people to make alternate educational plans for their children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 2, 2011

I have had three daughters attend Trillium. It is a wonderful school. Unusual is the decision making process where the children learn that their opinions truly count and they learn to resolve conflict with words. At times this takes a long time and a lot of care, but what a skill to learn. Two of my daughters had Rob Van Nood, who teaches 3,4,5. He is an amazingly creative teacher. This year, he decided to start the year in an empty room with no furniture. They have developed a learning style that is fluid and hands on, with the kids moving around the room in all sorts of interesting explorations. The school is not for everyone, but it is truly a kind a loving place.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2010

I Love Trillium because they Care! Also in the upper grades they allow the students to work together & help one another. My Son Loves Trillium & he's a Senior this year! Yeah!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2010

This is a great, innovative school that really helps the kids that are ahead of their grade level, while gently pulling up those who are below their grade level. Their full-spectrum programs don't focus entirely on the simple math, history, english area, but also include humanities, music, and other less common areas (horticulture, anyone?) For a small charter school, they do a great job - heck, for a big school they do a great job.


Posted May 16, 2010

I love the school's focus on sustainability, democracy, and nonviolent communication skills.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 5, 2010

Individualized learning for each child
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 25, 2010

We love Trillium because of the focus on the local and global communities. My 9 year old is aware of the importance of recycling, composting, reusing as much as possible, the value of arts education and the value of being part of a respectful, compassionate community of amazing people! Trillium is truly unique and we can't imagine sending our children anywhere else.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 25, 2010

Trillium is a public school with a strong sense of community and in addition to preparing our kids to be a beneficial member of society it encourages them to become a part of the greater community now and engages them on many levels.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2010

There are lots of pluses: A K-12 environment where kids interact with students of all ages, a high level of creativity, lots of child decision making, and kids are empowered to take charge of their school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2010

Trillium Charter School is a public school that nurtures each child's inherent curiosity, creativity and connection to community. We support diverse learning styles and use democratic processes to help students grow fully as human beings and contribute to and enhance the world.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2010

A small K-12 (plus pre-school) school where students really have a say about what and how they learn each day. This makes for a wonderful learning environment. Plus families are actively encouraged to be involved in many ways making for an awesome community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2010

the teachers at Trillium seem to really like kids - they are warm and kind and creative, and the parents are involved.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2010

My child loves to go everyday. The program teaches to the whole child. The staff works with each child on an individual basis. Individuals needs and interests are developed.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 61% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
70%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
>=95%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
83%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
>=95%

2010

 
 
90%
Writing

2010

 
 
31%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 58% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
76%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
92%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
>=95%

2010

 
 
>95%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
52%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 63% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
72%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 61% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
43%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
77%
Writing

2010

 
 
37%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
39%

2011

 
 
39%

2010

 
 
56%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 67% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
85%
Science

The state average for Science was 66% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 56% in 2010.

2010

 
 
57%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 71% in 2010.

2010

 
 
85%
Science

2010

 
 
58%
Writing

2010

 
 
39%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 69% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
73%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 85% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
>=95%

2011

 
 
86%
Science

The state average for Science was 63% in 2013.

13 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
67%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 60% in 2013.

13 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
70%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students57%
Female67%
Male47%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White56%
Economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students77%
Female93%
Male60%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White78%
Economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students50%
Female62%
Male40%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White59%
Economically disadvantaged46%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students82%
Female85%
Male80%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White86%
Economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students65%
Female75%
Male59%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White62%
Economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students85%
Female92%
Male82%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White89%
Economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Science

All Students77%
Female75%
Male77%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White77%
Economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students70%
Female69%
Male71%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White76%
Economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilities36%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students77%
Female77%
Male77%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White86%
Economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilities55%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students62%
Female73%
Male53%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White58%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilities29%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students85%
Female91%
Male80%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White83%
Economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilities43%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students72%
Female77%
Male67%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White77%
Economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilities67%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically gifted86%
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students75%
Female82%
Male67%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White81%
Economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilities50%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically gifted>=95%
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Science

All Students63%
Female53%
Male73%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White69%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilities67%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically gifted88%
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students71%
Female63%
Male83%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White80%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students86%
Female75%
Male>=95%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White>=95%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Science

All Students92%
Female86%
Male>=95%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White>=95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Writing

All Students69%
Female>=95%
Male33%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White70%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 80% 65%
Hispanic 6% 21%
Two or more races 6% 5%
Black 4% 3%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2% 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Female 47%N/A48%
Male 53%N/A52%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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5420 North Interstate Ave
Portland, OR 97217
Phone: (503) 285-3833

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