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GreatSchools Rating

Irvington Elementary School

Public | K-8 | 529 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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12 reviews of this school


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Posted June 9, 2012

Irvington is such a wonderful school! It is staffed by people who REALLY care about the students and the community it serves. As a parent, I have found the principal and teachers to be very responsive to the needs of my children, one of whom has special needs. Over the past year, both of my children have made significant progress with the help and support of staff. I'm happy to say that both of my kids are well-adjusted and LOVE learning as a result of their experiences at Irvington. At the end of the day, that's what really matters to me.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 20, 2012

I'm afraid I have to agree that Irvington is mediocre... with 'issuez'. My daughter went there for two years before we finally pulled her out for another PPS school. The difference was night and day. Academically, she was behind the average kids at the new school despite being in the 'advanced' math class at Irvington. Socially, the school has some problems particular to the neighborhood and the community that really detract from making it a good learning environment. While the parents are really involved, there is no push for more well-rounded curricula in the lower grades. The onus is on the parent to supplement with after-school classes, which were quite pricey there compared to the new school. As for 'issuez': if you are into the IDEA of a community school and into the idea that you are creating a sesame street style world by regentrifying and pushing out established inner-city neighborhoods, you will love Irvington. If you are interested in your child receiving a quality education relevant to the demands of the future and unencumbered by drama (like fights and smoking on school grounds, yearly racist graffiti, dog poop in the playground), you really should look elsewhere.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 20, 2012

Irvington is a wonderful school, full of diversity, a strong, caring staff, and supportive parents. The new principal is making changes that everyone is excited about.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 1, 2011

Both of my children attended Irvington. Although I was a great supporter of the school in the early grades, can now look back and see the school for the mediocrity that it is. The school did not serve my children well, the quality of the teachers average to poor. There were some bright spots... but this school is below average in my mind. If your children have any gifts, talents, there are no (real) programs in place to really nurture these... the TAG program is a joke. I recommend you interview the teachers, look at the class sizes, the quality of the afterschool programs and decide for yourself.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 12, 2010

Irvington has proved to a Great School for my daughter as she moves on the Middle School! GO IRVINGTON!!!!!!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 5, 2010

Save a few teachers, this school is a disaster and does not live up to the over-inflated reputation. This is my daughter's second year there and I'm afraid it will be her last. I just can't express how disappointed I am in this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 15, 2009

Irvington is not just a school, it is a family of parents, students and educators all striving for growth and community involvement.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 7, 2008

All five of my children attend Irvington and I Love the culture but I don't think the children are prepared for future learning. I have a child that is went to Irvington and then to middle school before the k-8 transition and she was Not prepared for Middle school. I also have three other children and I hope that they get what they need...I am thinking about sending them to a private school but financial obligations is going to be difficult.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 12, 2007

Irvington is actually in a rather desirable neighborhood. It IS a real-life Sesame Street. It is actually a K-7 school now, next year it will be a K-8. which is why my review is going to differ. As the school is transitioning, the Principal is losing her enthusiasm and a grip on discipline.There does seem to be a new racial fracture in the older grades. The younger grades, k-4, are fine but I am worried about our future past those grades. There is no real school spirit here. Don't expect any school songs or for the Principal to know your name or even your child's name. Any enthusiasm generated by the many active parents and teachers seems to be easily quashed, even resented by the principal. I know many parents are hugely disappointed and will be looking elsewhere soon.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 1, 2006

We moved to Irvington Elementary School mid year with our 5 and 8 year old children. Previously we had been at a private immersion school and were all but asked to leave because our son was having issues learning in the immersion school environment. My son had been put down in front of other children and was called dumb by his teacher. He came to Irvington with low self esteem and with low-average test scores. After only four months my son is reading at his grade level, has great self esteem and is well on his way to being at his grade level in math. His teacher is wonderful and is always available to us to answer any questions. My daughter is in the kindergarten class and although we were worried about her because she really thrived in the immersion school, she is doing so well. We love Irvington.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 28, 2006

Irvington is one of few schools where diversity is celebrated and students interact respectfully and happily. Irvington is a positive place in a great neighborhood. There are a lot of transfers INTO the school. It is very desirable by Portland standards. My first impression was I had sent my child to a real life 'Sesame Street'. The education the children get is about as good as I think it gets in Portland.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 9, 2004

Overall, considering Irvington's location (which gives it the potential to be a much less desirable place to leave your kid all day at school), I feel the school is safe, clean, fun, and conductive to learning. It is obvious they take behaviour and discipline seriously and don't tolerate continuous offenses. I also feel my son is getting most of what he can from the school. My only complaints are applicable to probably any school in the district; the food provided for breakfast/lunches is absolutely horrible (I strongly feel it is far below children's nutritional needs). I'm of the opinion that all public schools need a major revamp of this program. Pre-packaged food from companies like Smuckers & Lays, frequent lunches like pizza and corn dogs... I'm simply very disappointed in what children are provided. If I can provide healthy meals on a tight budget, I think the school district can too.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 61% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
71%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
78%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
85%
Writing

2010

 
 
56%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 58% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
69%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
70%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
70%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
35%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
81%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 63% in 2013.

55 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
30%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
71%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 61% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
64%
Writing

2010

 
 
49%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
67%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 67% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
50%
Science

The state average for Science was 66% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
67%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students62%
Female72%
Male50%
African American17%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic55%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White74%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Students with disabilities22%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students85%
Female>=95%
Male71%
African American83%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic64%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White94%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilities67%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students74%
Female58%
Male86%
African American30%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White91%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Students with disabilities43%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically gifted>=95%
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students74%
Female58%
Male86%
African American40%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic33%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White88%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Students with disabilities29%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically gifted>=95%
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students74%
Female60%
Male82%
African American60%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic71%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White80%
Economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilities50%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically gifted>=95%
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students76%
Female80%
Male74%
African American60%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic57%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White83%
Economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilities43%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically gifted83%
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Science

All Students76%
Female70%
Male79%
African American70%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic57%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White80%
Economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilities50%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically gifted>=95%
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students62%
Female68%
Male54%
African American33%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic38%
Multiracial63%
Native Americann/a
White87%
Economically disadvantaged42%
Students with disabilities30%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students62%
Female58%
Male67%
African American20%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic25%
Multiracial75%
Native Americann/a
White>=95%
Economically disadvantaged38%
Students with disabilities30%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically gifted>=95%
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students57%
Female78%
Male42%
African American55%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White67%
Economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilities33%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students57%
Female89%
Male33%
African American55%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White50%
Economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilities33%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students50%
Female47%
Male54%
African American17%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White>=95%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students54%
Female53%
Male54%
African American33%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White86%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Science

All Students46%
Female53%
Male39%
African American8%
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White>=95%
Economically disadvantaged44%
Students with disabilitiesn/a
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 57% 66%
Black 23% 3%
Hispanic 11% 21%
Two or more races 6% 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 2%
Asian 1% 4%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students participating in free or reduced-price lunch program 37%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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1320 NE Brazee St
Portland, OR 97212
Website: Click here
Phone: (503) 916-6386

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