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GreatSchools Rating

Sunnyside Environmental School

Public | K-8

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

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36 reviews of this school


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Posted March 16, 2009

SES is the most amazing place. I went to SES for 6th-8th grade. I couldn't have been more happy. Not only did I learn math and spanish, but i learned things that are more important. I learned how to share. I dont mean sharing my toys, but sharing my heart. I learned how to accept anyone despite their opinions, appearence, or background. I learned the importance of family and community. The lessons they taught were ones people dont usually learn until later in life. I was fortunate to learn them early. When it comes to the end of the day, you dont need math to be happy, you need family. I would give anything to go back. Yes, some kids dont work out there. but thats only like 2 in every 300 kids. I loved it more than anything.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 5, 2009

Although Sunnyside Environmental is an expensive school it also gives a great chance to exprience differant curiclums. It has great teacher and classes. It is a comitment kind of a school but in my 3 years it has made me relize how the world really is and could be. SES is an amazing school and if you are thinking of this option I would say please try it. The teachers are very personal and want the best for your individual needs and will spend endless time to make sure you get good grades and they activly participate in the childrens lives. We do have may outside feild studies and over night trips and if you are worried about money you are ussually able to work something out. All around great school!
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 31, 2008

I love this school it is so awesome and a lot better than any other school, the teachers are great, great classes, you have a lot of field studies and out door learning, you're learning everything a regular school would teach you and more. Everyone is involved and they have meetings 3 times a week where they sing and tell about events, really a great school
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 17, 2008

I LOVE this school the teachers are nice and you feel like you're learning- a John Dewey gem... bravo for making kids come first
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 25, 2008

Sometimes the money issue is important, because although SES is a public school, they go on many extensive field trips about once a week and there is also a special trip to the beach for each grade at the end of the year. Sixth grade and Seventh graders go to the Oregon Coast and Eighth graders fly to LA and stay on the island Catalina at Howland's landing, where they spend eight days learning about the environment and marine life, hiking, sea kayaking and snorkling. There is also an all school camp out at either Mt. St. Helens or Eagle Fern Camp, depending on the theme of the school year (there is a three year rotation refarding the year of the mountain, forest and river). And to make sure your child gets to participate, there are several ways a student can earn 100 dollar scholarships through volunteering during all three years.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 13, 2007

We pulled our child out of SES, after giving it a 3 year 'try'. We liked the community and the notion of a enviromental school, but there was little substance to back up the ideal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 12, 2007

The teachers and staff are great with the kids! The school is very beneficial for all students .I turned out great! I live on the east coast now and own a Nursing Business, and my goal oriented mind set started at Sunnyside!
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 24, 2007

The parents are so involved, the activities provide so much room for student creativity, and the teachers are wonderful! The curriculum is very creative, and never leaves kids bored. The school spirit at this school is spectacular, and everyone is treated respectfully.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 23, 2006

Both our son and daughter were students at Sunnyside Elem. before it became SES. I was always pleased with the education they received then. I held out some hope that experience would continue. I was appalled to learn that there actually was not a K-5 curriculum in place as in the past. Lesson plans for any given day are at the whim of the principal. The lack of safety in and around the building was also a huge concern. During the numerous times I volunteered in my childrens classes, it was never clear to me who were actually parent volunteers and who were people wandering in off the street.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 9, 2006

This school has some attributes. They have very educated and dedicated, caring teachers who put their heart and sole into teaching. They place high expectations for their students.There are many wonderful outings and field trips with one special one at the end of 6th grade. Unfortunately, the school on the whole we found to be very disorganized with teachers taking on too much and not able to clearly state what homework/classwork expectations were for any given class. The principal when my student attended was extremely biased and unprofessional when it came to administering alledged disciplinary actions. Actions were taken that did not follow lawful school protocol.This was surprising given their philosophy of acceptance of diversity.This school allows harrassment/bulllying to continue without proper inervention. Snap judgements are made to protect the guilty. I would not recommend this school to anyone who values good sound judgement and fair leadership.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 16, 2005

I have three childern that have gone to SES, my first started there 12 years ago and is now gradguating early, my two younger ones have gone for the last couple years. I really enjoy being involved in the school, by doing so i am aware of what is happening in the school. Any parent that takes the time to learn about their childs education would be aware of the happenings in and around the school. This school offers more then the three R's because children need more then that to learn about life. The teachers are great, kind caring and very helpfull in many ways. The principal has a fresh outlook and is extreemly involved on all levels with all children on a daily basis. I'm glad complaning parents have taken their children out so that it has let some of the children on the huge waiting list in.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 2, 2005

We have pulled both of our k-5 students out of the new SES after what we feel was a wasted academic year for our children. The concept of an environmental school is all well and good, but without proper planning, the overall educational benefits for the students are suspect at best. There were several instances where students and parents were not properly informed about school outings and therefore not properly prepared for things like inclement weather or nourishment. .
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 23, 2005

My sons attended EMS for three years. I would not recommend the school unless the student is in a two parent household and the family has no financial restrictions. EMS was expensive! I still find it difficult to believe the school district would allow such required fees and poorly planned field trips. In public it was said that no one would be turned away, but when I asked for financial help for an expensive 4 day trip I was told there was none if I did not make under the food stamp guidelines. Each year we had to bring hundreds of dollars in equipment and supplies. I donated paper cutters that my kids never saw in a classroom. Duct tape was used by students to make wallets! I thought students would learn about reusing, recycling, environmental issues, and preservation at EMS. I loved that students had to do community serv.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 22, 2005

Sunnyside Environmental School failed our children in many ways. The classrooms were chaotic and loud. The outings were poorly planned with little or no learning taking place, environmental or otherwise. The grammar school operates without a curriculum. The middle school students use profanity around the younger students and can be seen pushing their way through the halls. Despite amazing amounts of parent support and highly qualified teachers the school suffers under the poor leadership of an inexperienced principal. The principal showed little interest in our concerns and directed our family to other schools in the area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 8, 2004

Sunnyside Environmental School is not what we thought it would be. The class sizes are very large, math and reading are secondary to learning about the environment. Lack of focus, identity and leadership have made us turn to other sources for our children's education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 9, 2003

Sunnyside School has a committed staff to doing what's best for kids. Many of the teachers are veteran teachers, and are really interested in having the students reach their best potential. Class sizes are currently small. However, to keep class size small we have lost our music prgram I guess you can't have it all.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 61% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
85%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 66% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 64% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
81%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
>=95%

2010

 
 
94%
Writing

2010

 
 
67%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 58% in 2013.

62 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
81%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
81%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

62 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
84%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 63% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 61% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
84%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
87%
Writing

2010

 
 
64%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 63% in 2013.

67 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
81%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 67% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
81%
Science

The state average for Science was 66% in 2013.

68 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students86%
Female86%
Male86%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial90%
Native Americann/a
White88%
Economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilities83%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students91%
Female86%
Male94%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial70%
Native Americann/a
White94%
Economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilities83%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students83%
Female88%
Male79%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White85%
Economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilities57%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students86%
Female88%
Male85%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White87%
Economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilities57%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically gifted>=95%
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students87%
Female84%
Male90%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial>=95%
Native Americann/a
White85%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilities75%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically gifted>=95%
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students85%
Female90%
Male79%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial86%
Native Americann/a
White86%
Economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilities50%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically gifted>=95%
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Science

All Students81%
Female93%
Male69%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracial>=95%
Native Americann/a
White79%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilities67%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically gifted89%
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students68%
Female68%
Male69%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic57%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White70%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Students with disabilities17%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically gifted>=95%
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students82%
Female83%
Male80%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanic86%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White84%
Economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilities50%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically gifted86%
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students77%
Female81%
Male71%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White80%
Economically disadvantaged46%
Students with disabilities30%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students87%
Female93%
Male78%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White89%
Economically disadvantaged60%
Students with disabilities55%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically gifted>=95%
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Math

All Students66%
Female70%
Male63%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White65%
Economically disadvantaged59%
Students with disabilities13%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically giftedn/a
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Reading

All Students72%
Female81%
Male66%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White74%
Economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilities33%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically gifted>=95%
Special Education with Accomodationn/a

Science

All Students90%
Female>=95%
Male85%
African Americann/a
Asian/Pacific Islandern/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White93%
Economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilities88%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Academically gifted>=95%
Special Education with Accomodationn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Oregon used the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in reading and math; in grade 11 in writing; and in grades 5, 8 and 11 in science. The OAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Oregon. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Oregon Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 82% 65%
Two or more races 8% 5%
Hispanic 6% 21%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 3% 4%
Black 1% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 2%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students participating in free or reduced-price lunch program 27%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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3421 SE Salmon St
Portland, OR 97214
Website: Click here
Phone: (503) 916-6226

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