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are gifted children inclined to hate homework?


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noraskids November 9, 2009


My son is very advanced for his grade. Some people would liken his maturity level to that of a 6th grader and he's only in 2nd. He exceeds in his academics as well. Because of this, he tends to think that he already knows everything and that school is a waste of time. He also despises homework. He does attend one of the best public schools in the state. We really can't afford a private school.Does anyone have a gifted child that feels this way about school and can anyone offer me advise on how to remedy this before it gets worse? Help! Thanks.

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healthy11 November 9, 2009


Hi. Yes, many kids (especially gifted kids who aren't challenged appropriately) hate homework. Other people have asked questions similar to you, and I think you'll find many helpful resources and support by joining Greatschools Gifted Group at http://community.greatschools.net/groups/11537
I don't know if his school offers gifted classes beginning in 3rd grade, or if he might be a candidate for skipping a grade, but in the interim, I know there's a book called "Teaching Gifted Kids in the Regular Classroom" by Susan Winebrenner, and I think there's a similar book by another author about Teaching Younger Gifted Kids...If the teacher is willing to differentiate his instruction a bit, it should help.

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TeacherParent November 9, 2009


Children who learn quickly and who think outside the box can sometimes be their own best teacher. It's not uncommon for gifted children to dislike school as they find it doesn't match up well to their learning style. It's also not uncommon for children in general to dislike homework.
Matching him with teachers who understand his learning needs and who are themselves people who 'think outside the box' can help a lot. Rigidly structured teachers usually don't do well with gifted children. Gifted children tend to do better with teachers who approach curriculum with some creativity.

Keep your ear to the ground - find out what you can about next year's teachers and request the teacher that you think is best for your son. That can help. And help him to develop and solidify friendships within his class so he can at least look forward to seeing his friends at school even though he doesn't look forward to school.

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noraskids November 9, 2009


Thanks for the help and the great advise! When his teacher asked what's your favorite part of the day, his reply was "going home". I feel so bad sending him to something he doesn't enjoy. I just wish it would get better. It's the busy work that he hates and last year it was all the coloring. Can you blame him?

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AZDar8440 November 11, 2009


I relate. Our High Functioning Autistic is also very intellegent and feels that homework is "boring" and beneath him. Thank Goodness we now have a great teacher through district home schooling who always brings something new to the table to simulate and keep him interested in school. I would encourage you to consider a due process route as far as talking to apprpriate staff, in the appropriate order, about your concerns and challenges in regard to keeping your gifted student academically stimulated,engaged in the academic process, and keenly interested in school by the appropriation of "out of the box" approaches that will focus on his specific learning style and topics of interest. Before even this however, I would seek out an experienced child advocacy agency family support partner( around here there is Pilot Parents) and go talk with them about a possible 504 for your student. (504's help assure that the learning needs of your student are being met so he/she can successfully stay interested and engaged with academics at school.) Act now, work with an experienced family/advocay group. Also, you might be able to request an IEE...an Independent Psycho-educational Evaluation (at public expense )to obtain a broader/ comprehensive picture of your student and his specific needs. The IEE supplies further recommendations (from a school district recommended independent PhD.)concerning academic/learning style needs. Good luck! Please keep us posted!

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noraskids November 11, 2009


AZDAR, I am going to have to read your letter several times just to get all that great info in my head! So glad to be talking with parents who are/have been going thru this. I really don't have a clue and I've foolishly been sitting here waiting for the district to come to me! HaHa! Fat chance that's ever going to happen. So I am going to have to take the initiative, as I see from all of you that that's the thing to do! Thanks!

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mom-of-8 November 13, 2009


the best thing to do with a child like this..at home at least, is to stay upbeat about school. That may mean just not getting into a big conversation with your child about school. Two negatives will never make a positive. I hate homework with a passion, but I'd never tell my child, because my thought as a parent does not need to mimic my childs' thoughts. The kids are the ones who have to go thru school...we've already done that...and they have to get use to the idea that they have to do work in school...and do homework...whether they like it or not. For an advanced child it may be so easy just to zip thru it, get 'er done, then go play (if it's homework). If the child is really advanced, then the school should have a way to test them, and at his young age putting him ahead one year just may be the thing. It's much easier when they are younger to do this. But...he will still have to work. Boys are so different than girls, even in school. My son is 22, tested gifted in like more areas than most anyone in our school. He did great until 5th grade, then did lousy until he went to 11th grade, decided to go to Opportunity School, where he did work on his own, 4 hrs a day, and no Fridays, and finished 2 yrs in 1. He missed out on the best of his school career by doing this. No music, sports, dances, or anything. And he was being a "butt-head" at home. If I could have put him into a private school, I think things would have turned out much better for him. He's still very bright, just un-motivated. don't let this happen to your child, he's just beginning his school career, make it a good one.

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4olivia1127 November 14, 2009


Gifted children need to be constantly challenged as well as praised for the achievements. I created a star chart for my gifted children and rewarded them with a golden star whenever they completed homework on time and without my prompting. At the end of the week the stars were tallied and a reward was given based on the number of gold stars earned. Extra curricular activities are also helpful. i.e. music lessons or art classes at the Museum.

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jls168 November 16, 2009


I was considered a "gifted" child and also hated homework. It was boring and I didn't see the point to it. By third grade I decided I didn't care and did very poorly in school until my Junior year of high school. When I asked myself what changed I realize that I had a goal to work towards. I discovered what career I wanted. I worked hard to counter the damage I had done to my academic record and went to college, graduated cum laude and am now working on my master's.
Now, I doubt your second grader will discover his future career goal. For now I would recommend helping him explore his interests in music, sports, art, ect. Even if he's interested in something different every other week. Then support his interest but let him know that the school work comes first. (I still didn't enjoy a lot of work in my gen ed courses but I got it done because I knew I couldn't do what I wanted to without doing what I needed to). Also, take a look over his homework and see if you can tie it in to what he's currently interested in. Let his teacher know what he's interested in too so he/she can do the same.
Some schools also give student's time to do independent study. You may want to discuss this kind of option with his teacher.
Whatever you do, make sure he learns to prioritize. It's great to give him the opportunity to do things he wants to do, but we all have to do things we don't want to. The sooner he learns to prioritize and manage his time the more successful he will be later.

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rogomom2 November 16, 2009


I am actually surprised "one of the best public schools in the state" would have the students mainly coloring in first grade. My children attend parochial school and the top students in my child's first grade class are reading difficult chapter books. One parent heard these students comparing notes about Harry Potter books. Students at this school are also allowed to go to higher grade levels for different subjects if need be. There is a kindergarten student who goes to third grade for math for example. It sounds like the school is not doing the best job to me. Options should be given to kids who are advanced. If they are not, then I think you may need to push for them. I thought most public schools at least offered an accelerated reader program. That's a good start. There also is a possibility that your son is just being a boy. It seems to me that boys resist homework more, but maybe that's just my experience.

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noraskids November 16, 2009


WOW! AMAZING RESPONSES! I really like the last post. Yes it would be great to send him to different classes above his grade level. I don't know if this would be possible but I will mention it. He 's not just being a boy. He has an interest in poetry. I was just told he got a 99 on the NNAT test and is being considered for the intellectually gifted. There is no doubt he has the ability and I thank each and every one of you for your help. Public schools have their excuses. They say the teachers have a full plate with the different levels each child is at and they tend to focus on catching the slower ones up. But does that mean we forget about the brightest? I think not!



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