Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Philadelphia Harambee Inst Cs

Charter | K-8 | 449 students

 

Be sure to visit

Take along one of
our checklists:

 

Living in Philadelphia

Situated in an inner city neighborhood. The median home value is $91,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $900.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 5 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

21 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted October 25, 2013

Harambee is an excellent school, majoring in math and science. The students have a great outlook about themselves and others. They are also motivated, purposeful learners with self and racial pride! This school has proven itself well over 40 years. I hope they expand into high school and into New Jersey as well. I'm a grandmother and I endorse Harambee


Posted April 8, 2012

I have a 22 and 18yr old that went to Harambee and now a 6yr old. Harambee is a very safe environment for children. While everyone is entitled to their own opinion, we spend way too much time tearing each other down as a culture and community. As an educational facility I like that the Institute is unique in it's own vision. I like how the curiculum instills characteristics in our youth that allows them to believe in themselves. Some people think the school's tatics are unprofessional a rough-only because they do not allow anyone to come in there and take over or force change and divert Harambee from it's purpose and vision. Harambee promotes leadership, unity, determination, self reliance. Let's face it-as a people we are really lost for direction. I never had to worry about no one fighting my children or following them home with a bunch of non-sense. There is too much violence in schools and I'm pleased to say when I drop my child off I can go to work and know, without doubt he is safe!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 6, 2012

YOU KNOW I HAVE BEEN A PARENT AT HARAMBEE SINCE 2000 AND i HAVE SEEN PARENTS COME IN AND OUT OF THE SCHOOL BECAUSE THEY CANNOT COME IN AND DO ANYTHING THEY WANT WITHIN THE SCHOOL SYSTEM. HARAMBEE HAS THE BEST EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM BECAUSE THEY WORK ON THE WHOLE CHILD AND NOT JUST WHETHER HE/ SHE CAN READ WRITE ADD AND SUBTRACT. LET'S GIVE 7 HARAMBEES AND GET READY FOR SOME "REAL EDUCATION"!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2011

Our daugher went to this shcool for Kindergarden and first grade and were not pleased with the teaching staff or communication with administration. We have made several attempts to speak directly with the administration to get an update on my daughters progress but the only people concerned were my wife and myself. The teachers and staff are very unprofessional. There are only a few programs or activies for tyour children to participate in. They have a lunch policy that only allows your child to bring certain healty foods and if they dont bring in the specifed food they will throw it away, but, they sell all types of junk food during school hours which is totally hipocritical. Overall we were very disappointed with our experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 13, 2011

Harambee is a good school, i agree they focus too much on African Heritage. they need to teach kids how to live in todays world. they have gotten better with trying to provide an environment for more advance childen. my son went there for 6yrs and my daughter has been there since kindergarden and is going to the 8th grade. the school is a safe place and the school is kept clean. it has updated technology. i would reccomend this school. parent involvement is a must. you have to attend parent meeting monthly or your child will be put out. there is no tolerance for children with behavior problems.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 9, 2011

I have a twelve yr old, daughter, that's attended Harambee since kindergarten and I love it. The education she's recieving is far better that the public school she would have attended and much safer. I only wish they had a high school so I wouldn't have to worry about what school she's going to attend in two more yrs.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2011

When my family first moved into this area in 2005, we went to The Harambee Institute to talk with someone about enrolling our daughter in the school. We were stopped at the front door, were not allowed to talk with ANYONE at all, and were forced to write our names, address and phone number on a yellow writing pad and were told that someone would call us. We never received a phone call, and we never went back.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 23, 2011

Very unprofessional environment. You would expect more from a school that has this much potential.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 24, 2010

My children attend the haranbee charter school since 2005!! Its a great school BUT if you want your children to learn about their heritage you have to do some damage control at the end of the day! I say this because there is a large focus on african heritage and all children should know about their history!! Im saying this because my children are of Indian descent also!! Because of the major focus on African heritage we spend alot of time giving them lessons in their other history!! So if your children do attend this school Youl just have to become a teacher also in the area of history and heritage.. But really all parents should be able to tech !!!! OVERALL its a great school for learning and its a very peaceful environment!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 9, 2009

I am proud to say that my child attend Harambee, my son has attended the public schools up until three years ago and trust me he will not go back!!! While attending this school you can actually see his transformation on a daily basis, he has become secure in his heritage, knowledge and understanding of how education play a major part in his current and future endevours. Yes the staff there can be a bit stern but guess what the children are not harmed they are safe and they know that if they ever needed someone to talk to those staffers are there and we all know that. Please stop complaining about the school not providing extracarricular activities that's what we as parents should provide along with support and understanding to a good educational investment (refer to test scores) listen we can't have it all at least not for now.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 25, 2009

I graduated from Harambee in 2008. I know firsthand what goes on there. I went for eight years. (From 1st to 8th)I may not talk about what the school did for me but they did a lot. Many people are ready to give a bad review. I never felt unsafe at that school. One major thing on those reviews was that the teacher-parent commutation was bad. If the parent felt that they needed to speak to a teacher, why doesn t the parent pick up a phone and call the teacher. Someone also said that they are last minute. Did you ever think that your child just might be handing the flayer to you late? I know that when I went there I received several papers for early dismissals, parent meetings and lots of other things. I received those days in advance. The major thing is that they do focus a lot on African history. If your child doesn t learn it there, then where and when will they learn it? Someone was upset because Harambee doesn t offer Extra Circular activates. What s more important, I think its education. If you are upset because there isn t a lot of torturing going on why don t you just tell your child to tell the teacher that they need extra help? Every year that I was there they focused on my education and I learned a lot. That s why my grades are in the high 80 s and 90 s this year. Some of my teachers did want to be my friend but they also had a discipline side to them. Harambee has dealt with the death of people that helped to make Harambee what it is and they still went on teaching that same day. The main goal is for the child to learn and I know that I did. There are some bad things about Harambee but there are good things that could over power the bad things. Sending your child to Harambee is a good idea.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 6, 2009

Harambee is an excellect school. The staff there are very involved with family and they really care about their students. This is the only school that I have seen where the rate of parental involvement is high and security is the best. Not only that the security there is great. The satff secure the parameters after school to ensure the children make it to therir destinations safely.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2008

The school isn't utilizing the resources the school district provides and it shows in our children's test scores. They don't assign enough homework and don't challenge the more advanced students. They need more qualified teachers to help train and assist the inexperienced ones.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 16, 2008

My 12 y.oo daughter attends this school and I am desperately looking for another school to send her to. The teacher-parent communication is horrible and problems aren't solved at all. There's not enough emphasis on homework or maybe it's the individual teaching skills per grade that's lacking......Also, there isn't any focus on tutoring and extra curriculum activities.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 8, 2008

This is my daughters 3rd year at this school and her last. I have many complaints about this school 1st being the focus so much on black history that they dont focus much on academics. There is no parent teacher communication, and when there's a problem nothing's done. I feel as if there reputation is the most important. The teachers are rude and impatient, and the administration is unprofessional.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 12, 2007

I think that Hamrambee has high expectations as far as teaching and wanting their students to excel. I am delighted with the exceptional teaching of black history, but there is more history that needs to be taught.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 11, 2007

As my child has only been there for 3 weeks, I have seen his confidence level jump 10 fold. His learning Swahili gives me a since ease. Everyday it's something new he's eager to tell his dad he learned. My wife and I have three children in college pursuing different fields, this is the first child that's actually very excited about school
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 23, 2007

My daughter has attended Harambee for 3 years. Each year it seems the school is losing more and more interest in the students and gaining more and more interest in fundraisers and reputation. I don't feel my daughter is getting a quality education. There is NO communication between the teachers and parents. I am extremely disappointed in this school. There are no extracurricular activities for the students. To say I am disappointed in this school would be an understatement! My daughter will not return to this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 4, 2006

They are very last minute in all of there parental notice whether its report cards or any other event going on in the school. The teacher want to be your childs' friend more than the adult to look up to for guidance. They don't have after school sports everytime they try to start a new team they ask for registration fees and the teams are never started and its like pulling teeth to get you money back. they say they want the parents to be involved at parents' meetings. Its more like a lecture of some kind once a month instead of what's going on in the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 22, 2006

Helllo my name is Dominique Brooks and I am a current Harambee student and I beleive that the academic learning process is excellant I believe that learining about your ancestors are very important because if you dont have a past then you dont have a future this is a very good school it consist of teachers as we call them (walimu) who care alot about our education I also believe that harambee is a great school for k-8 every single grade has 2 teachers that care about them as if they were there child but I love my school because all the teachers have open minds and are great listeners about what we think may make harambee better.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 80% in 2012.

40 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
69%

2009

 
 
87%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 74% in 2012.

40 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
40%

2009

 
 
77%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 83% in 2012.

58 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
66%

2009

 
 
59%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2012.

58 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
50%

2009

 
 
61%
Science

The state average for Science was 82% in 2012.

58 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
55%

2009

 
 
71%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 73% in 2012.

48 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
51%

2009

 
 
49%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 65% in 2012.

46 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
42%

2009

 
 
45%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 64% in 2012.

50 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
23%

2009

 
 
43%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2012.

45 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
45%

2009

 
 
67%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2012.

45 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
63%

2009

 
 
64%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 80% in 2012.

50 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
63%

2009

 
 
63%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 76% in 2012.

50 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
77%

2009

 
 
72%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 76% in 2012.

49 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
46%

2009

 
 
52%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2012.

49 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
86%

2009

 
 
79%
Science

The state average for Science was 60% in 2012.

49 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
22%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
21%

2009

 
 
27%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 73% in 2012.

48 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
77%

2009

 
 
70%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students78%
Female81%
Male75%
Black78%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students73%
Female75%
Male71%
Black73%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students64%
Female55%
Male70%
Black64%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students69%
Female68%
Male69%
Black69%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Students55%
Female50%
Male58%
Black55%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students50%
Female46%
Male55%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged40%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students50%
Female58%
Male40%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged39%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Writing

All Students66%
Female73%
Male58%
Black66%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students73%
Female81%
Male63%
Black73%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged62%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students62%
Female65%
Male58%
Black62%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students64%
Female70%
Male59%
Black64%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students74%
Female78%
Male70%
Black74%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students43%
Female35%
Male60%
Black43%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students72%
Female71%
Male73%
Black72%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Students22%
Female21%
Male27%
Black22%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged26%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Writing

All Students75%
Female76%
Male73%
Black75%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 100% 15%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 3%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Hispanic 0% 9%
Two or more races 0% 2%
White 0% 71%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Female 49%N/A49%
Male 51%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

640 North 66th St
Philadelphia, PA 19151
Phone: (215) 472-8770

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools



Overbrook Edu Center
Philadelphia, PA



St Donato School
Philadelphia, PA



ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT