Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Finletter Thomas K School

Public | K-8 | 853 students

 

Be sure to visit

Take along one of
our checklists:

 
Last modified
Community Rating

2 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

10 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted December 5, 2013

I'm a student at Finletter (7th grade)and grades above 6th have more mature kids and the teachers can control the kids well. The principal is great and she goes in and out of classrooms to see how well the students are doing. I don't know what people are saying that the lunchroom and school yard is complete chaos , when we need to go inside we line up and wait for the teachers (like always) and the lunchroom are kinda loud but we either get lunch or sit down at the lunch table and talk. I've been at Finletter since kindergarten and I might say until 8th but Finletter has gotten better since most teachers left and better teachers came.


Posted September 20, 2012

As a teacher I have definitely noticed a severe decline over the past ten years. It is complete chaos in the lunchroom and school yard. The school used to be a nice, positive learning environment. Since the most recent principal arrived in 2008 Finletter is now one of the worst performing schools in the district. In 2000 there were 1400 students that attended Finletter. Now there are fewer than 900. It is a shame to see a once great school become so bad in the past four years.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted March 22, 2010

I thought Finletter was a good school but now I am starting to think dfferent.Teachers at Finletter do not take responsibility for their classroom they are to busy helping teachers who bring their kids to school.I understand day care is exspensive,but the children that attends thomas finletter are being affected by this.When brought to assistant principle attention and also calling the board of education nothing still has been done. Teachers do not have time to help a student but have time to babysit co-workers kids on the clock,well I think there is something wrong with this picture.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 22, 2010

I taught at this school and left because the staff environment was so unprofessional. Tragically the students are not very well behaved at all. Most classrooms are total chaos. I was willing to stay and work hard to make my classroom a fun, safe, learning experience but the administration did not want me there as I complained that I did not agree with the procedures that the school was using with students and staff.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 18, 2006

Thomas k. Finletter is no longer the 'good' school it once was. When michael rosenberg left, every principal that followed, paled in comparison. Contrary to what's said, parents are not supported as they should be. The supervision in the lunchroom and schoolyard at this school is sorely lacking and there are 'at risk' students who are not properly monitored. This school's only redeeming quality is the little school house where the teachers are more consistent and on the ball! The environment there is no longer conducive for learning, which is why I removed my son.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 29, 2005

This school is located in a once, nice quiet neighborhood in the city of Philadelphia. Within the past several years it has begun to go down the tubes. I would rate their academic programs a 4, their extracurricular activities a 4 and the level of parent involvement a 5. This I rate in a 1-10 basis.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2004

I don't understand how this school is still able to operate! The little school house has to be the safest area, if you want to call it safe. My child is in the third grade. I can safely say the best school years were the first two. Due to learning difficulties the first grade had to be repeated and my child had the same teacher. Mrs. Leno, the teacher and Mrs. Lewis, the resource rooom director are the only positive forces from this school. The principal was so concerned about statistics that she wanted to promote my child when they weren't academically ready. All to meet statistics. All I can say is this school is definitely a reflection of how terrible the Philadelphia School District is! With the support of the teacher and resource personnel, my child is now doing fantastic in the New Jersey school system!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 21, 2004

My daughter had an excellent experience with the school in kindergarten(2000), and we, as her parents,were happy. The next two years were not pleasant. My daughter had great grades, however there were three different teachers in her class, she had to deal with safety issues at the school due to lack of staff during recess, or Lunchtime. My daughter did not have any support from her teacher in fending off disruptive children, and we, as parents, were not getting responses to our complaints, or attempt at scheduling meetings to deal with this. The new principal is trying her best, but after three years, we're tainted by our previous experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 10, 2003

Too many principal changes. caring staff.


Posted June 6, 2003

I have two daughters who have been attending this school since October 2002,one in the 1st grade and the other in the 3rd. This was there first experience in a public school and it has been my worst nightmare. The children of the school are not being protected due to the lack of security at the school. As parents, we educate our children to the best of our knowledge and we also reiterate what the they are tought by their teachers. This is hard to do when our teachers aren't doing their jobs. Principals of schools are leaders and teachers are a reflection of their leadership. The School District of Philadelphia needs to clean these mirrors.


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 80% in 2012.

90 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
55%

2009

 
 
44%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 74% in 2012.

90 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
41%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
47%

2009

 
 
45%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 83% in 2012.

75 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
61%

2009

 
 
64%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2012.

74 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
38%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
42%

2009

 
 
48%
Science

The state average for Science was 82% in 2012.

76 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
37%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
51%

2009

 
 
52%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 73% in 2012.

83 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
51%

2009

 
 
47%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 65% in 2012.

83 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
34%

2011

 
 
30%

2010

 
 
32%

2009

 
 
29%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 64% in 2012.

89 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
16%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
25%

2009

 
 
21%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2012.

78 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
42%

2009

 
 
55%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2012.

77 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
35%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
26%

2009

 
 
43%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 80% in 2012.

87 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
56%

2009

 
 
45%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 76% in 2012.

84 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
64%

2009

 
 
61%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 76% in 2012.

86 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
51%

2009

 
 
55%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2012.

90 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
71%

2009

 
 
71%
Science

The state average for Science was 60% in 2012.

95 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
19%

2011

 
 
17%

2010

 
 
6%

2009

 
 
15%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 73% in 2012.

96 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
74%

2009

 
 
52%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students51%
Female49%
Male53%
Black53%
Asiann/a
Hispanic46%
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students41%
Female44%
Male39%
Black41%
Asiann/a
Hispanic39%
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged38%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students47%
Female57%
Male37%
Black45%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged48%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students38%
Female49%
Male27%
Black37%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Students37%
Female44%
Male30%
Black35%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged34%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students40%
Female46%
Male35%
Black42%
Asian27%
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged37%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students34%
Female41%
Male28%
Black30%
Asian55%
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged34%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Writing

All Students16%
Female23%
Male10%
Black14%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged17%
Students with disabilities (IEP)17%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students50%
Female46%
Male54%
Black46%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged48%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students35%
Female41%
Male29%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged32%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students48%
Female51%
Male45%
Black43%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students54%
Female51%
Male56%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students59%
Female58%
Male61%
Black56%
Asian100%
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged60%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students68%
Female76%
Male59%
Black65%
Asian85%
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilities (IEP)8%
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Students19%
Female19%
Male19%
Black17%
Asian46%
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged18%
Students with disabilities (IEP)0%
English language learnersn/a

Writing

All Students79%
Female85%
Male73%
Black75%
Asian92%
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilities (IEP)18%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 74% 15%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 11% 3%
Hispanic 10% 9%
Two or more races 3% 2%
White 1% 71%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

6100 North Front St
Philadelphia, PA 19120
Phone: (215) 276-5282

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools

Lowell James R School
Philadelphia, PA


St Helena School
Philadelphia, PA


Franklin Benjamin School
Philadelphia, PA


Olney El School
Philadelphia, PA


Creighton Thomas School
Philadelphia, PA



ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT