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Wissahickon Cs

Charter | K-8

 

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Living in Philadelphia

Situated in an inner city neighborhood. The median home value is $78,500. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $840.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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18 reviews of this school


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Posted February 5, 2014

The school don't have enough support programs to handle children with learning or behavioral disabilities in order for the children to become successful students I wouldn't recommend this school for children that requires special supports.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 5, 2014

Not to bad mouth the school but if it was under different administration it would or maybe ran better also the selection of the staff could be better due to I am actively working on getting my children out of there some of the teachers seem a bit incompetent and don't seem to get the job done and I don't feel like the school is doing these students a huge disservice when it comes to their education for three of my children to be in attendance their and the amount of children that continue to be selected for their summer reading program to be below their reading level boggles my mind and makes me wonder is it really the students NO I believe it has to be the staff it's no way that these children should have to suffer.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 9, 2012

My husband and I are happy we choose to send our daughter to this school, and look forward to our youngest daughter attending next year for kindergarten. We feel the teachers are involved as long as they feel the parents are engaged. We value education and our home and our son attends a private school now, but I feel if WCS had a High School option this school would be his home as well. I hope WCS can one day become a school that goes up to twelfth grade especially before my oldest daughter enters 8th grade. Keep up the Good work WCS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 7, 2012

The teachers and sdministartion know each student by name. The facility is clean and vibrant. It is everything an elementary school should be.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 8, 2011

I pass many public schools on my way to WCS to drop off my daughter. The only persons I usually see outside these schools are crossing guards and an occassional staff member to help with children getting off the school buses. At WCS the deans are outside along with the crossing guards and bus attendants. Watching over the children and making sure they arrive and leave safely. My daughter is now in 4th grade. Since she started in Kindergarten, I have been impressed with the management, teachers and staff at this school. It is one thing to say a school cares about its students. Everyday at WCS, it is evident that it does.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 25, 2010

My son began kindergarten this past year at WCS and since the very first day, we have been blessed and impressed with this school. The teachers and administration are all very approachable and interested in the children and their progress throughout the year. The learning environment is very creative and dynamic and so much learning happens OUTSIDE of the classroom as well, which I really appreciate. I stopped counting how many field trips my son has been on this year! We have two other children still at home and are already looking forward to sending them to WCS in a couple of years as well. Everyday my son has the opportunity (some days more than one) to play outside in the fresh air, which is very important to me. The school emphasizes parental involvement and I have been able to be in the classroom every week volunteering. Good job, WCS!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 13, 2010

I have 2 children who attend the school. I'm an educator by training who spent years bringing my programs to Philadelphia neighborhood schools. When I first walked into the school, I was blown away with the unique beauty of the students artwork that covered every wall. I then noticed the quiet. It wasn't a 'forced' quiet, but a quiet buzz of peaceful, happy activity. Every student I saw was relaxed, peaceful, purposeful. I saw small learning groups on sofas in the hallways. I could see into each class through huge square windows. This was a school that wanted to feel open, free, fluid, creative, communicative. This was the polar opposite of what I had experienced in the Philadelphia public schools, but these were the same kids that attend those schools!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 6, 2010

I have taught at public, private and charter schools. Some of the best schools in the city and I've also seen really difficult schools. This school is a dream. The teachers honestly will go out of their way to understand the child's needs and meet them in a holistic way. The academics at this school are exceptional and the children can even take electives like pottery, yoga, latin dance or spanish. They have outdoor recess in a park almost EVERY day! There is a student mad garden and recylcing bins everywhere. The parents who send their their kids there are in general very supportive and welcoming to new families. i would love to send my child here.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted March 18, 2010

The teachers show favoritism and their line of communication is broken as well. My son hurt is wrist by falling in the yard after a game of basketball with other children and asked to go to the nurse. He was denied as the teacher and staff thought he was downplaying his injured. I had to wait until my son got home to call and tell me that he hurt his wrist and was denied when asked to go to the nurse. The principal even tried to justify his staff's actions. I am looking into other schools for next year and pray that I am able to get my son out of there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 12, 2009

I have to say that one of my two children have been attending WSC since it opened. In my noticing how they school is ran I think that there are many unfair practices. For example: My son continues to not turn in his homework even though it is being completed at home. I am not updated with concern from the teacher until it is too late for anything to be done and his report card has been finalized. I see homework assignments being sent home that are non-educational and have no benefits to the learning process of other schools in comparision. Yes, school should be fun but there is a time and place for everything. These children and attendance are going to struggle when they move on to other schools. I hope and pray that these parents wise up!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 4, 2009

Great community of teachers, students and parents... A rare find in Philadelphia!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2009

My seventh grader has been a student at WCS since its opening in 2002! I must say that the first two years were rough in regards to academic support. They have made great strives in providing support both academically and socially to all students. I enjoy the fact that my daughter loves going to school and loves being involved. One suggestion: I would love to see a tutoring program implemented.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 19, 2009

I have one child currently enrolled at the school who will be entering 1st grade. So far, so good.... no major complaints, my child is on grade level and has progressed academically a great deal. He's reading, writing and doing math. I also love the fact that they incorporate the responsive learning technique in their learning style.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 24, 2009

Wcs is a school that focuses on our children and allows them the opportunity to learn and grow in an environment that fosters and develops their interest in preserving our environment, and in essence our world. Our two daughters attend school there, and since our 11 year old started at the age of 6 in the second grade she has shown a growing interest in being a true leader and wanting to preserve our planet, and has also grown socially through education and wanting to be a better student. My cons for this school would be that they should be more selective in their student acceptance process, and they should also ensure that parents have some kind of involvement in the school. I've noticed a growing trend with students who are overly active and very distracting to the students that are there to learn.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2009

My child is currently in attendance at this school level 4 and I am seeing problems. I don't feel all the teachers are connecting with the students. I see more conversations going on between the staff than work be taught. I haven't adjusted to the switching of classrooms. I think the kids are lost. I hoping for a better year if not I must seek education else where.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 30, 2008

WCS was a truly disappointing experience for me. My daughter left third grade doing second grade level work according to three private schools in the area. I had several conversations with her teacher and the administration and don't believe they ever gave her the attention she so clearly needed. Although she was offered admissions to all 3 schools, her admission was conditional upon tutoring (all summer and all 4th grade year) in order to bring her up to grade level. When I explained this to her teacher, the response was, 'These students are not on the level of private schools. I teach them where they are.' I agree that teachers should find out what level each child is on at the beginning of the school year, but isn't it their responsibility to teach them to where they should be? Shouldn't third grade level be third grade level at every school?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 11, 2007

WCS is great place where the whole child is educated. Academics are stressed, but the social curriculum through the Responsive Classroom is also important. My children are in 5th grade and have been at Wissahickon since grade 2. It's a fabolous school, with a wonderful staff, climate, and administration. Send your kid to this school if you can.


Posted October 17, 2006

I am truly impressed with the academic progress with this school. I truly believe that the Principal teachers and all other staff members care about the welfare of all the children. When the school first open it had a lot of things to work on, but I feel the school has finally found it's place in the school district. There is one thing I do dislike, which is the mishandling of the school buses, I feel they are poorly run and unorganized. If the school would manage the school buses a lot more closely, the children would be able to get to school for breakfast.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 80% in 2012.

45 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
70%

2009

 
 
76%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 74% in 2012.

45 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
65%

2009

 
 
71%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 83% in 2012.

39 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
83%

2009

 
 
76%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 72% in 2012.

39 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
64%

2009

 
 
67%
Science

The state average for Science was 82% in 2012.

46 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
86%

2009

 
 
89%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 73% in 2012.

43 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
61%

2009

 
 
35%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 65% in 2012.

41 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
50%

2009

 
 
44%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 64% in 2012.

46 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
47%

2009

 
 
52%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2012.

38 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
78%

2009

 
 
76%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 69% in 2012.

39 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
68%

2009

 
 
73%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 80% in 2012.

41 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
86%

2009

 
 
39%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 76% in 2012.

41 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
73%

2009

 
 
39%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 76% in 2012.

40 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
35%

2009

 
 
63%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2012.

41 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
50%

2009

 
 
80%
Science

The state average for Science was 60% in 2012.

45 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
31%

2011

 
 
36%

2010

 
 
19%

2009

 
 
33%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 73% in 2012.

45 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
49%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
48%

2009

 
 
60%
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students73%
Female83%
Male67%
Black68%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students65%
Female72%
Male59%
Black58%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students74%
Female59%
Male86%
Black74%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students54%
Female53%
Male55%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged45%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Students72%
Female59%
Male79%
Black68%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilities (IEP)46%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students65%
Female71%
Male62%
Black64%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students61%
Female61%
Male61%
Black60%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged59%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Writing

All Students59%
Female65%
Male54%
Black58%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged58%
Students with disabilities (IEP)25%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students87%
Female95%
Male79%
Black86%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students67%
Female80%
Male53%
Black68%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students81%
Female82%
Male79%
Black80%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students71%
Female82%
Male58%
Black69%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Math

All Students63%
Female67%
Male58%
Black62%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students83%
Female72%
Male95%
Black82%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Science

All Students31%
Female26%
Male36%
Black26%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged29%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a

Writing

All Students49%
Female52%
Male45%
Black48%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multi-ethnicn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged46%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % at or above proficient

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Pennsylvania used the Pennsylvania System of State Assessments (PSSA) to test students in grades 3 through 8 and 11 in math and reading, in grades 5, 8 and 11 in writing, and in grades 4, 8 and 11 in science. The results for reading, writing, science and math are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The PSSA is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Pennsylvania. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test.

The different student groups are identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Pennsylvania Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 91% 15%
White 6% 71%
Two or more races 2% 2%
Hispanic 1% 9%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 3%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Female 48%N/A49%
Male 52%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
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4700 G Wissahickon Ave
Philadelphia, PA 19144
Phone: (267) 338-1020

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