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Parent picks: Great books on dyslexia

These six books, recommended by a parent of a child with dyslexia, cover a gamut of topics, from advice on navigating the public school system to tips for coping and becoming an effective advocate for your kid.

By Darla Hatton

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Overcoming Dyslexia

Overcoming Dyslexia

Overcoming Dyslexia: A New and Complete Science-Based Program for Reading Problems at Any Level
by Sally Shaywitz
Vintage (2005), $17

A great book that explains what dyslexia is and gives parents tools for helping their children become fluent readers. The book validated that we were doing what we needed to be doing — based on the research findings presented.

Darla Hatton, the mother of a child with dyslexia, is a presenter on reading and assistive technologies and a certified reading specialist. After misinformation delayed her daughter in receiving proper early interventions, she’s made it her mission to shorten the learning curve for other parents. Check out her video, I Am Dyslexia and she maintains a web site, Dyslexia Facts.

Comments from GreatSchools.org readers

07/19/2010:
"I found this book a lifesaver! It is the best book I have read regarding dyslexia so far. It has great facts that a parent needs to know before going into face the school about providing support. I have found out that the support given to children is wrong, and why it is wrong. I would recommend reading the book. I think the 'Overcoming Dyslexia' may be the wrong title. It is more about dispelling the myths and a comprehensive evidence-based approach to assisting dyslexics."
02/1/2010:
"After working with my dyslexia child for the past six years, I would never buy a book that states that dyslexia can be overcome. I have been told by many experts that it can only be compensated for by learning techniques that compensate for the differences in the way dyslexics learn. Only the dyslexic person can find those compensations through hard work and perseverence. It is a lifelong learning process that is never overcome or cured. So far, this has been true for us."
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