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Stop summer brain drain

Instead of letting your kids zone out to reruns, help them discover that learning can be fun beyond the classroom.

By Lisa Rosenthal

Think summer is a carefree time when kids should put away the books and cut loose? Think again. If you let your children just hang out, they may fall victim to “summer slide,” or the loss of knowledge and skills acquired during the school year.

Use it or lose it

On average, students who don’t engage in summer learning lose the equivalent of two months’ worth of grade-level math and reading skills, according to the National Center for Summer Learning at Johns Hopkins University. “What I worry about a lot is summer reading loss,” U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan recently commented in Education Daily. “You have kids who don't have a lot of books at home and aren't read to. You get kids to a certain point in June, and when they come back in September, they're further behind than when they left you three months ago. It's heartbreaking.”

Other ways kids lose ground over the break:

  • Students typically score lower on standardized tests at the end of summer vacation than they do at the beginning.
  • Most tend to fall behind in math and spelling because they have fewer opportunities to practice these skills while on break.
  • Teachers spend an average of four to eight weeks every fall reviewing material students have forgotten over the summer.
  • Kids tend to gain more weight when they are out of school — particularly those who are at high risk of obesity and spend a lot of time playing video games or watching TV.

 

Beyond the classroom

Keeping up on their learning doesn't mean that children should be studying vocabulary lists and doing math worksheets. Summer is the perfect time for children to discover that education isn’t limited to the classroom.

"You don't want your kids to think that learning is only something that happens in places called schools," says Susan K. Perry, author of Playing Smart: The Family Guide to Enriching, Offbeat Learning Activities for Ages 4-14. "Rather, you want them to grasp that learning is fun and can go on anytime, anywhere, with handy materials, not only based on the instruction of an actual schoolteacher.”

Summer schooling

Whether you are taking a trip to a far-off place or staying in your own neighborhood, there are ample opportunities for your children to grow and learn. But be careful not to overplan. "To avoid boredom, a child has to learn to be motivated on his or her own to a certain extent, and that is an acquired skill," says Perry. "If every time your child says, 'I'm bored' you step in with a quick solution, they'll never learn to develop their own resources. But do provide some options. Just don't try to instill learning. That's not how it works."

Need help stemming the summer slide? Sign up for our back-to-school tips of the day and learn about fun activities to keep your kids engaged and busy. For example, you can:

  1. Organize a book club for kids. It’s a great way to foster a love of reading and get kids talking about books. Depending on their age, kids can organize their own or have their parents join in. For tips on how to do it, read “It's Not Just for Oprah: Book Clubs for Kids.”
  2. Plant a garden. It’s all the rage now that First Lady Michelle Obama has started a vegetable garden on the White House lawn. Kids who tend a garden will learn about dirt, seeds and seedlings, where food comes from and more. Plus it’s good exercise. You can plant a garden in your backyard or get together with other families to start one at school or on a community plot.
  3. Get theatrical. Gather a group of kids together to perform a play. They can write their own script, act out a story they have read or memorize a play. Family and friends make a great, supportive audience! Check your local library for Lively Plays for Young Actors: 12 One-Act Comedies for Stage Performance, by Christina Hamlet, or other books with plays for young people.
  4. Visit a planetarium, science museum, or zoo. Many science museums have special summer programs geared for kids, in addition to interactive exhibits to engage them. A summer field trip will make science come alive.
  5. Build or bake. When you help kids bake a cake or build a bird feeder, they learn about measuring and reading directions. They’ll also have the pleasure of creating and sharing a finished product.

Lisa Rosenthal, the former managing editor of GreatSchools, is an independent communications consultant in the Bay Area.

Comments from GreatSchools.org readers

09/13/2010:
"i never really thought of planting a garden to help keep my kids entertained. now im off to update my todo list: plant a garden!"
09/10/2010:
"thanks!"
09/7/2010:
"'interesting!'"
09/2/2010:
"I agree parents should show their kids how school integrates into life. Instead of sitting them down and giving them worksheets to do over summer, and reinforcing that 'school' is where you go to learn, take them to places, age appropriate, and show them how what they are learning is needed in everyday life. Otherwise you end up with the kid who looses interest in school by the 5th grade because they ask 'Why am i learning this? Am I ever going to need it?' and nobody shows them any different."
09/2/2010:
"there are chances for kids to learn in any enviornment and i love that this article gives that idea to people!!"
09/2/2010:
"my kids learn so much from the day to day stuff like cleaning, gardening, and baking"
09/2/2010:
"I like this I used to hate being stuck at home bored."
09/2/2010:
"Great article! We actually did everything on this list. We had fun learning all summer."
09/2/2010:
"Hey, this stuff is actually pretty useful!! Thanxs!!!"
08/30/2010:
"Great info thanks!"
08/30/2010:
"Very informative"
08/30/2010:
"I've been prepping my 2 1/2 year old grand daughter for school as well. We only watch programs that allow learning or such things as dancing. We have planted a garden two years in a row and she loves to help pick and eat the rewards. "
08/30/2010:
"Nice to know I am doing something right, I think we did this all."
08/30/2010:
"thanks for great info!"
08/30/2010:
"good article"
08/30/2010:
"interesting"
08/23/2010:
"I agree...keep those brains working. Keep your kids active."
08/23/2010:
"reading is essential "
08/23/2010:
"I love being part of our 2 year old grand daughters learning process. We have had lots of fun and plenty of education this summer"
08/23/2010:
"interesting!"
08/23/2010:
"I love the build or bake idea."
08/23/2010:
"This is a great article that every parents need to read about"
08/23/2010:
"thanks, its great to keep kids creative!"
08/23/2010:
"I completely agree with summer schooling. Parents need to provide kids with opportunities to learn!"
08/23/2010:
"Thank you"
08/23/2010:
"every bit of advice helps"
08/23/2010:
"All very good ideas!"
08/23/2010:
"GOOD TIPS & general info"
08/23/2010:
"Love these ideas!"
08/23/2010:
"story time at the local library is a great idea too."
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