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GreatSchools Rating

Austin Discovery School

Charter | K-6 | 400 students

Creative and critical thinking. Project Based, hands-on learning.

 
 

Living in Austin

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $110,200. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $980.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 10 ratings
2013:
Based on 8 ratings
2012:
Based on 6 ratings
2011:
Based on 5 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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98 reviews of this school


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Posted August 19, 2014

Major concerns about the new principal and 30% staff turnover after he completed his first year. He is trying to do too much too quickly and it is impossible to get a straight answer from him. At the rate he's running off the established teachers, the school will have all newbies within a couple of years which is a shame because one of the things that is unique about ADS is the teachers who are working hard to build a real community. Communication from the administration is non-existent and always last minute. Two examples of recent issues: 1. It's just a few days until school starts and they haven't released class lists yet (probably because they don't want to reveal how much they over-enrolled since one of the school's selling points is the low student:teacher ratio). 2. They have a new bus service and just let everyone know that it won't be running until 2-3 weeks into the school year. The new driver just got his CDL and has never driven children before and he will be driving 70 kids around in rush hour traffic on I35 - scary thought.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 9, 2014

The new principal is going to turn ADS into a less than ordinary school. My kids will enter 1st and 4th grade next year and I have very mixed feeling right now. I m extremely worried about ADS's future. I love the community and I LOVE the teachers! However, the new principal is pretty much on probation as far as I m concerned. While he appears to be an effective leader and a go getter , he is pushing through some extremely aggressive initiatives in a short period of time. In my opinion, these initiatives are being pushed out (at light speed) at the expense of other, very important issues that still need to be fixed within the current infrastructure. I feel overall like he s a numbers guy with not a lot of emotional equity in our school (kind of like a career politician). Get the test scores up, attract more families and students, bigger, more not seeing the forest for the trees. I am not a crunchy hipster and I don t care about the sugar rules. What I do care about is this great school, and our community (and our teachers!!) being bulldozed so this guy can say oh, hey, look at all the great stuff *I* did, without considering the collateral damage. Stay gold ADS!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 16, 2014

This school has been such a wonderful experience for my 2 children. No, it's not perfect (is anything?) but I'm left without words with regard to the learning experience my kids receive here. It truly makes learning so much fun for them, not a day goes by where they don't look forward to going to school. The staff is incredibly qualified and so creative working to meet the needs and learning styles of each child. Yes traffic is crazy, communication could be better, but I can look past that for my children. ADS is in our hearts, we all (parents included) love this place.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 4, 2014

ADS is the right place for my children and many others. The kids are happy, confident individuals starting in Kindergarten. The learning that takes place happens all over campus rather than just in a classroom. The weekly hikes and Eco-Wellness classes are something that my kids would not be getting at any other school. The teachers are, for the most part, outstanding and committed to this style of education. The parents are extremely involved as they need to be at this type of school. (I wish I could do more for the school myself!) The leadership of the school has gone through some transitions over the past few years however overall the spirit of the school has stayed the same. It is not perfect so I can't give it a 5 but I'd give it a 4.5 if I could!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 3, 2014

We have been at ADS for 5 years now and love it. The focus is on real education rather than passing state tests. There is a true outdoor learning component, and kids are truly nurtured in their emotional and social growth.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 2, 2014

My daughter is a first grader at ADS and has attended since kindergarten. Even though it is a bit of a drive and much less convenient than our well rated neighborhood school, it is worth it to send her there. The curriculum is centered on project based learning with a constructivist approach, which means kids there are learning by doing, finding connections between subjects and putting what they learn into practice. Instead of daily worksheets drilling facts, she is writing stories, researching and doing poster presentations, and explaining her math thinking rather than just writing down the right answer. She is also happy and excited to go to school because her class is a tight knit and supportive community. The teachers really care about the kids and create an environment where the kids learn to appreciate and help each other. ADS fosters whole child development which is something I really like about it. They just got approval to amend their charter to add middle school and I plan to keep her there through 8th grade.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 2, 2014

We joined ADS with a first and a third grader after moving to Austin from out of state. Both kids were welcomed into the community right away. We were impressed with energetic outgoing teachers who teach real life lessons. On the weekly Friday hikes, the children get sunshine, exercise and nature. Ecowellness is a unique part of the curriculum. There is good communication via Rallyhood and email. Our new principal has made excellent changes already and is visible and approachable at school. My oldest, now a fourth grader, is telling me to write "We love ADS!" right now.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 2, 2014

Caring teachers, outdoor education, 1:16 ratios, gardens, creative and invigorated teachers, involved families. I appreciate the careful growing and nurturing if my children who attend this school. Positive discipline and loving staff. A very involved parent body. We spent 3 years at another school and are a new family who love the difference. My children have blossomed and are challenged. No grades doesn't mean too easy. I love the portfolio evaluations - they really help us understand what my children are learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 27, 2014

We have 2 kids at ADS, and we're very happy there. The teachers are highly educated (moreso than our exceptionally-rated neighborhood school). There's no bullying, and the kids are generally sweet and kind. I love that my kids learn so much without realizing they're learning. They also get a lot more individual attention, and more challenge. The homework is less busywork and more thought-provoking. We also love the ecowellness program and Friday hikes. The kids don't feel like they've been cooped up all day, but they're not just "playing," either. They really do a lot of learning outside when weather permits. The teachers really care about the kids, which makes me feel like my children are safe. Most of all, my kids are happy and enjoy going to school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 1, 2014

Not a school. More like a group of buddies running a fundraising machine that feeds back into their close knit group. "Oh, you're a parent? wanna be an administrator? hired. Oh, I know you from somewhere, wanna teach?"...the ridiculous list goes on and on. Look at how often parents and staff bounce around from position to position, all of which they would be completely unqualified if vetted by any other charter, private, or public school. But hey, they can all hold hands and sing good intentions while the education and emotional health of young children are sacrificed. The complete disregard for very basic standards and regulations has harmed children at ADS. Don't be fooled. ADS carries some dark secrets. Investigate before you enroll your child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2013

Both of my children are non-traditional learners, and ADS has served them well. My son, especially, required a very individualized approach, and ADS has jumped through hoops to make it work. My kids love learning now. I don't believe any regular public school, or likely and other charter school, would have worked so hard and tried so many things to accommodate my kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2013

We are on our third year at ADS and have had a great experience. The team teaching has been wonderful and the specials are very enriching. My kids go on hikes every friday and garden every week. Science, art, and music are all a large part of the curriculum. They don't just teach to the test like most schools in Texas. Yes it is a school filled with hipsters but that by no means implies a lack of diversity. My children's classes have all been very diverse. As for the food restrictions, if a parent is going to get offended because certain foods aren't allowed on campus, I fear there is a bigger issue. ADS would NEVER allow a teacher to rip anything from a child's hand. If a parent sends their child to school with a sugar and preservative laden lunch, its the teachers who have to deal with the effects of those chemicals. The food policy is there to help kids get the most nutrition so they can function at their best. Parents should be involved in their child's academics so that they aren't surprised at the end of the year if the child has fallen behind. These bad reviews sound to me like parents blaming the school for their own shortcomings.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2013

My child attended ADS for one year. I found the parent/teacher communication to be unacceptable. As a parent, after basically demanding a parent teacher conference, I was told that my child was doing just great. My child was not doing great, not at all. As a parent you are often told what they think you want to hear. It almost seems like you have to be on the payroll to know what is going on at the school. The administration is no better. My child was in 3rd grade and had no idea who the principal was. Really? In a school with less than 400 students. Most of the faculty have children attending the school and it seems they move on when their child is done. The school has no diversity whatsoever. If you and your child can fit in with the clique, you will have a chance at succeeding in this school. The test results speak for themselves. It's hard to send your child to what you believe is a "better" school and watch him/her regress. I would not recommend this school for a normal well adjusted child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2013

Austin Discovery School is an incredibly different school compared to anything I have ever attended or any my daughters have attended. A school that places such emphasis on community, enrichment, and educating children on the environment is a school that would benefit any child. My daughter has blossomed as a student and as a person due to the quality of the education she is receiving from the wonderful teachers and staff at this school. The staff and parents here work so hard to beautify the campus and help make our school a great place to come and learn and play. Honestly, the only bad thing is I wish it went higher than 6th grade. We have one more year to go and we will miss this place so much.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 14, 2013

My 2 kids have both gone here since Kindergarten. My daughter will be entering 4th grade this fall and has thrived here, even excelled. My son on the other hand is being held back in the 1st grade because "he doesn't retain math and reading skills." He has had the same teachers for two years and I was not made aware of his struggle until VERY late in the year, like only 2 months left. They stuck him in tutoring which 2 weeks before the end of school they told me didn't work and that he was going to have to repeat 1st grade and may need to be tested for dyslexia etc. WHY THE HECK DIDN'T YOU CATCH THIS EARLIER AND TEST HIM THEN SO HE DIDN'T SUFFER HAVING TO REPEAT THE 1ST GRADE!!! His scores showed that he was at grade level at the beginning of the year and that they dropped! He reads just fine to me at home and his math does need work but I am blown away that help didn't come until it was too late. The earlier reviews about it being a hipsters paradise are accurate. The over the top sugar control is accurate. I have such mixed feelings because we have had very different experiences with both our children. We are trying them for one more year. we shall see how it goes.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 13, 2013

I have two children, and both have attended or are attending ADS. My daughter graduated 6th grade from ADS and has just completed her first year at Kealing - a very challenging, competitive middle-school - where she earned straight A's every report card. My son is still at ADS where he is excelling at math and reading. ADS is based on solid principals of how children learn best. They work hard to nurture inquisitive, thoughtful children. They understand that outdoor time is imperative for cognitive development. Sweet snacks are prohibited because sugar spikes cause so many negative issues. The teachers here are teaching because they love it, and it shows. But ADS is not for everybody. The school doesn't always do a great job educating the parents about the benefits of these ways, so if you don't come in knowing, it will just seem oddly loose and restrictive at the same time. It's not a great school for rote learners, or kids whose learning style requires rigorous structure. It is a wonderful school for people who want enthusiastic, life-long learners with a genuine appreciation for the world we live in.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 12, 2013

Our child is not coming back next year. I absolutely love the idea of ADS and loved everything I was told on the school tour. But I barely saw any of it during the school year. Academics were less than. Yes, she learned about rainforest and how it needs to be protected. But nothing else! The parent community is weak, there is no diversity. Mold is in the building. Filthy dusty classrooms. Constant water puddles in the hallways from the water fountains. It's like noone cares and noone takes pride. And the food police! Man. I am all for healthy eating. I couldn't send her anything in her lunchbox that had added sugar. When she brought a bottle of hibiscus tea with a little bit of honey, the teacher ripped it out of her hands and dumped it in the sink. If you are looking for a school where parents compete who is more crunchy, whose kids completely lack any kind of personal hygiene, who have no social skills, but sure know A LOT about rainforest -- then this is the school for you. Otherwise, don't bother.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 15, 2013

It pains me to rate ADS as below average, but in spite of effort on all fronts, the school did more harm than good for my child. We did not realize the full extent of the negative effect of his years at ADS until he began attending another school. It is my hope that things improve at ADS, but I would advise any parent considering ADS to seek feedback from families who have left the school to formulate a balanced view of its strengths and weaknesses.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 27, 2012

All that on the wab page about teachers working together with parents to benefit the children is a complete farce. ADS is working for ADS to generate funding just like any other public school. As long as you don't have some idealized notion that this school is any different than any other public school, you should be fine. It probably is just as good as some public schools in Austin, but it is currently listed as academically unacceptable, so... This year they have over promised and under delivered.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 24, 2012

I gree with some of the most recent postings. My son attended ADS for just one year and we've moved on, neither he nor I felt it was a good fit. Some things were minor, others not so. The lack ofcultural and racial diversity was an issue, the noise level of the classrooms affected my son's concentration, and the teachers by and large appeared unable to figure out how to positively deal with a regular boy who happens to like sports. At times it seemed like a place where the kiddos had to be overly mature for their age if they were to be happy. I felt like high achieving girls fared etter than boys. On the positive side, the aftercare program is awesome and most of the teachers are wonderful.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 89% in 2011.

57 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
98%
Math

The state average for Math was 87% in 2011.

58 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 85% in 2011.

57 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
89%
Math

The state average for Math was 88% in 2011.

56 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
68%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 90% in 2011.

57 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
84%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 82% in 2011.

38 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
98%
Math

The state average for Math was 81% in 2011.

36 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
93%
Science

The state average for Science was 87% in 2011.

39 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 84% in 2011.

30 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Math

The state average for Math was 83% in 2011.

29 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students95%
Female96%
Male93%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic94%
White94%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged93%
Special educationn/a
Not special education95%
Limited English proficient (LEP)88%
Proficient in English96%
Non-migrant95%
Gifted/talentedn/a

Math

All Students67%
Female62%
Male72%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
White70%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Special educationn/a
Not special education69%
Limited English proficient (LEP)50%
Proficient in English70%
Non-migrant67%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students93%
Female97%
Male88%
Black or African American60%
Asiann/a
Hispanic88%
White100%
Economically disadvantaged83%
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Special educationn/a
Not special education92%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English94%
Non-migrant93%
Gifted/talentedn/a

Math

All Students75%
Female81%
Male68%
Black or African American40%
Asiann/a
Hispanic63%
White90%
Economically disadvantaged55%
Not economically disadvantaged82%
Special educationn/a
Not special education79%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English75%
Non-migrant76%
Gifted/talentedn/a

Writing

All Students81%
Female90%
Male70%
Black or African American33%
Asiann/a
Hispanic75%
White90%
Economically disadvantaged64%
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Special educationn/a
Not special education83%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English81%
Non-migrant80%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talentedn/a

Math

All Students92%
Female85%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
White93%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged94%
Special educationn/a
Not special education92%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English92%
Non-migrant92%
Gifted/talentedn/a

Science

All Students87%
Female87%
Male88%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic88%
White93%
Economically disadvantaged80%
Not economically disadvantaged88%
Special educationn/a
Not special education92%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English87%
Non-migrant87%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African American100%
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talentedn/a

Math

All Students90%
Female87%
Male93%
Black or African American60%
Asiann/a
Hispanic86%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged92%
Special educationn/a
Not special education88%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English89%
Non-migrant90%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 79% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
89%
Math

The state average for Math was 69% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
77%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 72% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
93%
Math

The state average for Math was 68% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
55%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
80%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 77% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
94%
Math

The state average for Math was 75% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
81%
Science

The state average for Science was 73% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
79%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 71% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
92%
Math

The state average for Math was 74% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
78%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students83%
Female85%
Male82%
Black or African American43%
Asiann/a
Hispanic73%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Economically disadvantaged75%
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Special education60%
Not special education85%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English84%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant83%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted83%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Students58%
Female42%
Male70%
Black or African American14%
Asiann/a
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White74%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged59%
Special education20%
Not special education61%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant58%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted58%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students82%
Female81%
Male83%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic63%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Economically disadvantaged70%
Not economically disadvantaged87%
Special educationn/a
Not special education87%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English87%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant83%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted83%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Students56%
Female56%
Male56%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic38%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White65%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged59%
Special educationn/a
Not special education58%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English59%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant57%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted57%
Bilingualn/a

Writing

All Students74%
Female75%
Male74%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic57%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White81%
Economically disadvantaged69%
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Special educationn/a
Not special education77%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English77%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant74%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted74%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students91%
Female90%
Male91%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic89%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged89%
Special educationn/a
Not special education93%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English90%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant91%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted91%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Students68%
Female71%
Male65%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic44%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White71%
Economically disadvantaged57%
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Special educationn/a
Not special education73%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English67%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant68%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted68%
Bilingualn/a

Science

All Students82%
Female81%
Male83%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic67%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Special educationn/a
Not special education83%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English81%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant82%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted82%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted100%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Students93%
Female93%
Male93%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged92%
Special educationn/a
Not special education93%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant93%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted93%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

  • In 2010-2011, this school was rated "Academically Unacceptable".
  • In 2009-2010, this school was rated "Recognized".
  • In 2008-2009, this school was rated "Recognized".

About the tests


Texas uses Accountability Ratings to indicate the overall performance of each school and district. The ratings are based on TAKS test results, dropout rates for grades 7 and 8 and school completion rates for grades 9 through 12. Schools and districts rated under standard accountability procedures are designated as Exemplary, Recognized, Academically Acceptable or Academically Unacceptable. Schools and districts rated under alternative education accountability (AEA) procedures are designated as either AEA: Academically Acceptable or AEA: Academically Unacceptable.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 70% 29%
Hispanic 23% 52%
Two or more races 4% 2%
Black 3% 13%
American Indian/Alaska Native N/A 0%
Asian or Pacific Islander N/A 4%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander N/A 0%
Source: TX Education Agency, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Limited English proficient (LEP) 2%N/A17%
Source: TX Education Agency, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Beginning teachers 4%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
ELL/ESL Coordinator
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Math specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
PE instructor(s)
Reading specialist(s)
Special education coordinator
Speech and language therapist(s)
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Foreign languages spoken by school staff French
Spanish
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

Awards

Academic awards received in the past 3 years
  • Best Charter School- Austin Family Magazine (2013)
  • Generation Zero School (2013)
  • Longhorn Recycle Roundup (2012)

Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular special education needs
Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Staff resources available to students
  • Math specialist(s)
School facilities
  • Access to farm or natural area
  • Garden/Greenhouse

Arts & music

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Arts (all)
Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Photography
Clubs
  • Art club

Language learning

Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • French
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Access to farm or natural area
  • Garden/Greenhouse
School leaders can update this information here.

School basics

School start time
  • 7:50 am
School end time
  • 2:50 pm
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Bill Luna
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Email
  • Phone
Gender
  • Coed
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (512) 674-3133

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Multi-aged
  • Outdoor / Farm-based
  • Project-based
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Arts (all)
  • Environmental
  • Service learning
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • No
Level of special education programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular special education needs
Foreign languages taught
  • None
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Math specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Reading specialist(s)
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • French
  • Spanish
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
Transportation options
  • None
School facilities
  • Access to farm or natural area
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Playground
School leaders can update this information here.

Sports

Boys sports
  • None
Girls sports
  • None

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Photography
Music
  • None
Performing arts
  • None
Media arts
  • None

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Art club
  • Book/reading club
  • Lego League
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Neither uniforms nor dress code
Bullying policy
  • This school has a bullying and/or cyber bullying policy in place.
Parent involvement
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Organize cultural events
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Serve on school improvement team or governance council
  • Volunteer in the classroom
  • Volunteer time after school
More from this school
  • ADS purpose is to develop socially and emotionally aware children through hands on project based instruction which focuses on good health, fine arts, environmental and social stewardship, while pursuing meaningful and rigorous academics.
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

This school accepts applications on a

rolling basis

 
Apply now
 

Planning ahead

Students typically attend these schools after graduating
Magnet Public Schools
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

8509 Fm 969 Ste 200
Austin, TX 78724
Website: Click here
Phone: (512) 674-0700

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