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GreatSchools Rating

Kealing Middle School

Public | 6-8 | 1130 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 8 ratings
2012:
Based on 7 ratings
2011:
Based on 8 ratings

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68 reviews of this school


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Posted April 7, 2014

My son recently completed Kealing and loved this school. He learned skills to study and work at a high level. The teachers are amazing and go out of their way for the students. They create interesting material and challenging projects for their classes. Although it is not a good fit for everyone. The homework amount and level of intensity was a bit much at times. Daily and weekends. Good fit for the academically minded student who likes challenges and loves to study and learn. Our other child chose to go to Fulmore Magnet, a more well-rounded experience (not just academics), which has also been a good experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 22, 2013

I agree with the 8th grade blond girl, 5 hour HW is a tale. For my 6th grade son, Social study (World culture) has the most HWs, then Algebra, both are interesting and both teachers are great. My son does the homework slower after school since he was checking youtube, pokemen, games...... So he spent average of 3 hours in stead of 2 hours if he can focus.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 13, 2013

I currently go to Kealing and I love it. With a little organization and focus, you can basically get anywhere in this school. If you love a challenge and if you love learning, you will definitely love this school.


Posted October 27, 2013

I am a current 8th grader at Kealing. My time at Kealing has been stressful, I won't lie. I think that the benefits outway the cons. I know a big question for people considering Kealing is the HW load. I am taking AP Geometry this year, and I average about 2-3 hours of HW a night. In 6th grade it was much less. Tales of 5 hours a night are tales of kids playing video games and Facebook on their computer when parents aren't watching. As for grades, I have gotten an 89 in Algebra and above that for everything else. I know people who fall both above and below me in terms of grades. My teachers are great, and are very willing to help me out. Office Hours are a must, everyone goes to them so there is no need to worry about teasing, etc. My only negative feeling towards the school is that there are many Asian stereotypes at play i.e. Asians are the smartest, etc. As a blonde girl, this is frustrating and a little humiliating. Also, there are definite tensions between STAR and Magnet students. I do have friends in STAR, but I was bullied last year in Gym and have felt intimidated in classes with both programs.


Posted May 7, 2013

I am a Kealing graduate, went to LBJ Science Academy, then UT-Austin for engineering, then Harvard/MIT for a MD/PhD. I can only say that Kealing started it all for me. I was challenged, disciplined, and engaged to learn more and do better. Kealing prepared me for LBJ by allowing me to take advanced math classes and the science electives to this day were some of my favourites. I think the academic rigor and creative classes really set apart and self-designed a curriculum that excited me. Also, something that is very important and not to be overlooked... At the time, the neighborhood was pretty rough, (gang-related?) fights everyday and we had to wear our backpacks in front of us during lunch so our graphing calculators wouldn't get stolen. Some parents may think that this is a dangerous situation that they would never want their kids to encounter. It was an invaluable part of growing up and helped me learn the so called "street smarts" and a good dose of reality. And as a physician, people from multiple diverse backgrounds and socioeconomic levels have said that they can relate to me more since I understand their background. Thank you Kealing + LBJ. A winning combination.


Posted May 6, 2013

Kealing was definitely the right choice for me. I never had a challenge back in elementary school, and going into Kealing was just what I needed for my level. There's always a challenge waiting around the corner to get you, and only you can decide whether or not you will fight back and conquer the beast. If you feel like school is too easy for you, then come to Kealing if you're willing to fight back.


Posted April 25, 2013

A lot can change in the 20 or so years since I was a student at Kealing but it sounds like the work load and academic standards have not. As a 34 year old graduate of an Ivy league university, law school and MBA school, and Kealing, I can honestly say Kealing was the hardest, most challenging and stressful academic experience of my life. I would agree that the work load was probably "developmentally inappropriate" as I clearly remember working 5-7 hours a night, and these two years being among the most stressful of my life. However, in highschool honors classes there was a huge difference between students who went to Kealing vs Murchison and others. Also, the discipline and study skills I learned at Kealing carried me through highschool and ultimately the rest of my life. I never again want to work that hard consistently, but when the need emerges, I know how to turn on the focus needed for this kind of endurance. Ultimately this experience shaped who I am for the better, though it definitely came at a price. I know my success later in life started at Kealing.


Posted April 16, 2013

I work at Kealing MS in the Magnet Program. Our program is worthwhile for most students and families who join, since it really is a microcosm of life-in-general, with a few added supports and a few unique hurdles of its own. The pros? Students prone to "check out" in normal public school because they feel they're way ahead of the game almost certainly won't do so in this program. Between the accelerated curriculum, the robust extracurricular clubs/sports, and the wide variety of elective opportunities, a kid has no room to be bored. In addition, teachers have enough autonomy to create/modify curriculum to the accelerated needs of the students. Students create poetry, plant gardens, build musical instruments, study the stars, and much more. The cons? Sometimes the curriculum is heaped too high for the child's/family's time to manage. Sometimes the teacher doesn't fully understand the student's unique needs or family situation. Sometimes a student feels overwhelmed or misunderstood. But the best part? IT'S JUST MIDDLE SCHOOL. All its absurdities and stressors perfectly foreshadow those found in later life, but in a safer environment with some more room for mistakes. And learning.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted April 11, 2013

I am a current 7th grader, and I know that this school is tough. The academics are rigorous and the amount of homework I have can be a lot. But I feel like I'm learning so much more than I did at my normal public school. The courses are absolutely amazing! The math and science courses offered are really advanced and I'm learning more than I ever thought I would in middle school. I really do love Kealing Middle School. I would recommend it to anyone that wants more of a challenge than a regular public school can offer.


Posted December 22, 2012

Alrighty hate to be this one person, but Kealing is one of the best schools ever. Current Student in eighth grade so I've been through what your kids have been through. I couldn't have written this without Kealing. It has taught me many outlets of expressing myself, writing being one of those. I work on homework, on the bus, and at school during classes. If i sit down and focus I'm done in 45 minutes what apparently takes kids 4 years. It's not cause I'm better than others, it's because I focus. It takes kids doing "homework" on computers like 10x longer cause they multi task. Also this load of homework in Seveth grade. Been there done that. So easy. All you had to do was focus. I did Algebra and German as well. The teachers there are the best. They support critical thinking. In the end we don't follow district guidelines until we have to. We learn sometimes really useful things. Sometimes though we don't learn anything, because we think to much on a journal entry and debate. Overall Kealing in my opinion is one of the best schools for intellectual knowledge and for your kid to learn more. By that I mean interacting. I have scraped friends made new ones. Easy and a good thing too.


Posted December 9, 2012

Parents beware--the magnet program challenges the kids, however, the negative reviews on this site are right. The homework load is outrageous. My kid frequently has over 5 hours of work each night--no breaks, works continuously , even at the dinner table. After school sports and clubs had to be dropped to keep up.The load is so great that parents started complaining on the listserve. They reported stressed out kids, lots of tears and frustration. Administrators conducted a survey confirming the problem. 1 in 3 parents said they considered removing their kids from the school. Teachers have unrealistic expectations and can be a tad sadistic. In group projects one member of the group usually does not do their part so the others are up late picking up the slack. The new principal seems to want to change things but it's wait and see. A.teacher at a very prestigious private high school once told me not to worry about getting my child into the best schools until high school where it would really matter most. I wish I had listened and kept my student in our home school & then attempted to get into LASA which I hear has a wonderful, positive learning environment. We will not be back.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 24, 2012

The classes are extremely engaging, but the amount of work loaded on these kids is developmentally inappropriate. I have a post graduate degree in Education, and wanted my son to attend this school to be challenged; instead he is beginning to feel like he can't make the grade. I am trying to ascertain if the strong academics partnered with my child's plummeting self-esteem outweigh the "regular" curriculum of our neighborhood school where my child's self-esteem would remain intact. This school is not for everyone, and just because your child is bright/gifted does not mean this is the right learning environment for them. Is Kealing a good school? Yes, it is a good school. Is it for everyone? No, absolutely not.What would make Kealing a great school? Have a more inclusive accelerated curriculum that engages and encourages all students learning styles. Also, keep in mind an accelerated curriculum does not mean you must teach the students as if they are in college, challenge them , push them, but keep your teaching practices and expectations in line with the developmentally appropriate guidelines for the tweens and early teens you are charged with educating.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 8, 2012

Is Kealing Magnet harder? Yes. Is it better? Not sure. Some instruction seemed unnecessarily difficult. On the other hand, students do learn self-discipline. Is there more opportunity? Definitely lots of electives and after school activities. Are the kids great? Yes. Are teachers really engaged? Not in our experience. This one really surprised us. In fact, our student felt anonymous among Kealing Magnet teachers and considered returning to our former AISD middle school for its excellent teacher-student relationships.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 1, 2012

I'm a 7th grade magnet student at Kealing Middle School, and overall I would have to say Kealing is a great school. It's great for any child who is looking for a challenge, yes there's a lot of homework (it decreases as the year progress) but it is a great experience and a great advantage in their future. Kealing makes sure you are ready for life coming ahead and will make high school and college a breeze if you are successful. Don't freak if your child's grades than normal, it's normal the curriculum's are harder and challenging but overall it's a great school and highly recommend it for any bright child looking for a challenge!


Posted February 19, 2012

I cannot speak to the quality of the regular/CAP program, but as far as the Magnet School I can't say enough great things. My kid was utterly bored the last year of elementary school and Kealing completely woke her up. Yes, its tough, but all the kids in her group are completely supportive and devoted to making it. The classes are interesting and challenging. You MUST stay on top of the homework every day or you will sink, guaranteed, but if you can set the right rules for getting it done, its super worth it, and my kid takes a perverse pride in knowing she's in the toughest school in the city. The orchestra is amazing, the electives fun, the core classes challenging. Our kid immediately made new friends who were also eager to learn. I am so impressed by the level of smarts at this school. There are downsides: friends are scattered all over town and hard to see after school. The cafeteria is dysfunctional so plan on taking lunch. Really, my kid never had time to eat after going through the line, so we gave up. But overall, Amazing school. Demanding but brilliant.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 1, 2012

My child is now in the 7th grade Kealing Magnet program and it is far more sane for him than 6th grade was. He only has 1 hour homework a night and no longer has huge projects due every 6 weeks in multiple classes. I have not had to help him with any subjects other than some linear algebra they touched on for a week. That was hard core, but thankfully a short chapter. This has been a very easy year for the family. Nothing like 6th grade. My son is holding a 92 average in most core classes, 95 in English and history. He is a smart child but loves to goof off and play. He is still a child at heart. 7th grade is not crushing his spirit like 6th grade almost did last year. I no longer drive him so hard either. 92% in math and science are fine. He is 12. KM 85% is like A plus in other schools. Don't freak if your A+ baby drops to the 80's in a class or two. That holds double for 6th grade. Best of luck!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 9, 2011

Our 6th grader in the Kealing Magnet program is having a great time. He is finally getting academic instruction and challenge at an appropriate level for him. For years we paid extra for math instruction through the Stanford EPGY program and now he is able to take math at his level. His other classes are also very high caliber and interesting to him. The coordination between English and World Cultures is great. And science and band are both fun and challenging. He spends about 1 hour on homework during the week and just a couple hours on the weekend. I think this is very acceptable. I think some kids at Kealing may not have good preparation for scheduling their time but it's a skill they WILL eventually have to learn to get into a great college. Being a Stanford graduate household, this is what we want for our kids and I think this is the way to prepare them for that caliber school. Kealing isn't for every kid and some kids will mature later and not be ready for the responsibility and work yet. But if your student is really motivated and is aceing their elementary school work then Kealing may be a good option for them.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 1, 2011

It has good teachers, really! And it should be, considering its' a magnet school. YAY!!


Posted November 29, 2011

People complain about teachers being too harsh or the homework being too hard, but as a 7th grader at the school I can say that that's the point. You sign up knowing that you will be subjected to a heavy workload and possible stress, and you deal with it if you are actually interested in receiving superior education. If you don't then the consequences are your fault. Students at school are happy and supportive of each other and there is a strong, positive community. The curriculum is rigorous and covers much more ground than regular schools. Kealing also has great orchestra and band programs and a huge selection of fun, engaging electives that aren't offered at any other school. It's really a personal matter. You will hate the school if you can't handle the workload, but if you can the academic and personal rewards are great.


Posted October 2, 2011

I am a current 8th grader at Kealing in the magnet program, and it is one of the best learning experiences I've ever had. The curriculum is rigorous and difficult, but fun to learn about and gives you good study habits. There is a lot of homework but I enjoy doing it and I still have time for extracurriculars and friends. The orchestra program is also amazing and in the top ten middle school orchestras in the state. You make friends with kids in both programs and people from all over the city. The teachers are excited about teaching and we want to learn.


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 84% in 2011.

379 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
91%
Math

The state average for Math was 83% in 2011.

376 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 86% in 2011.

401 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
86%
Math

The state average for Math was 81% in 2011.

395 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
83%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 94% in 2011.

403 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 85% in 2011.

381 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
95%
Math

The state average for Math was 73% in 2011.

382 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
86%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2011.

383 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
84%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 95% in 2011.

382 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students86%
Female87%
Male86%
Black or African American64%
Asian100%
Hispanic75%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special education8%
Not special education89%
Limited English proficient (LEP)31%
Proficient in English91%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant86%
Gifted/talented99%

Math

All Students87%
Female87%
Male86%
Black or African American60%
Asian100%
Hispanic77%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged69%
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Special education30%
Not special education88%
Limited English proficient (LEP)54%
Proficient in English89%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant87%
Gifted/talented100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students89%
Female89%
Male89%
Black or African American66%
Asian100%
Hispanic82%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged74%
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special education30%
Not special education92%
Limited English proficient (LEP)55%
Proficient in English91%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant90%
Gifted/talented100%

Math

All Students87%
Female85%
Male89%
Black or African American52%
Asian100%
Hispanic80%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged69%
Not economically disadvantaged97%
Special education38%
Not special education88%
Limited English proficient (LEP)67%
Proficient in English88%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant87%
Gifted/talented100%

Writing

All Students95%
Female96%
Male94%
Black or African American86%
Asian100%
Hispanic90%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged86%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special education61%
Not special education96%
Limited English proficient (LEP)62%
Proficient in English96%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant95%
Gifted/talented100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students95%
Female97%
Male93%
Black or African American87%
Asian100%
Hispanic93%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged90%
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special education89%
Not special education95%
Limited English proficient (LEP)75%
Proficient in English96%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant95%
Gifted/talented100%

Math

All Students91%
Female90%
Male91%
Black or African American81%
Asian100%
Hispanic84%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged81%
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special education60%
Not special education92%
Limited English proficient (LEP)63%
Proficient in English92%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant91%
Gifted/talented100%

Science

All Students82%
Female81%
Male83%
Black or African American56%
Asian100%
Hispanic72%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged63%
Not economically disadvantaged96%
Special education60%
Not special education82%
Limited English proficient (LEP)33%
Proficient in English85%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant82%
Gifted/talented99%

Social Studies

All Students95%
Female97%
Male94%
Black or African American88%
Asian100%
Hispanic92%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged89%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special education70%
Not special education96%
Limited English proficient (LEP)76%
Proficient in English96%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant95%
Gifted/talented100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 71% in 2013.

336 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
82%
Math

The state average for Math was 74% in 2013.

323 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
85%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 77% in 2013.

368 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
86%
Math

The state average for Math was 71% in 2013.

117 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
77%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2013.

372 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
86%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 84% in 2013.

393 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
86%
Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

267 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
59%
Science

The state average for Science was 75% in 2013.

389 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
84%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 63% in 2013.

389 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
75%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 78% in 2013.

297 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%
Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 97% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Chemistry

The state average for Chemistry was 84% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
English I Reading

The state average for English I Reading was 65% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
English I Writing

The state average for English I Writing was 48% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
English II Reading

The state average for English II Reading was 78% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
English II Writing

The state average for English II Writing was 52% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
English III Reading

The state average for English III Reading was 63% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
English III Writing

The state average for English III Writing was 42% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 86% in 2013.

89 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%
Physics

The state average for Physics was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
U.S. History

The state average for U.S. History was 73% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
World Geography

The state average for World Geography was 75% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
World History

The state average for World History was 70% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students90%
Female91%
Male89%
Black or African American65%
Asian100%
Hispanic76%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged68%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special education17%
Not special education92%
Limited English proficient (LEP)36%
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant90%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted80%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Students88%
Female86%
Male89%
Black or African American56%
Asian100%
Hispanic74%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged63%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special education23%
Not special education90%
Limited English proficient (LEP)50%
Proficient in English91%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant88%
Gifted/talented99%
Non-Gifted77%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students87%
Female88%
Male86%
Black or African American53%
Asian98%
Hispanic84%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged68%
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special education12%
Not special education91%
Limited English proficient (LEP)57%
Proficient in English89%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant87%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted79%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Students41%
Female43%
Male39%
Black or African American29%
Asiann/a
Hispanic49%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged39%
Not economically disadvantaged58%
Special education13%
Not special education45%
Limited English proficient (LEP)50%
Proficient in English41%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant41%
Gifted/talented80%
Non-Gifted39%
Bilingualn/a

Writing

All Students80%
Female79%
Male80%
Black or African American38%
Asian98%
Hispanic70%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged49%
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Special education11%
Not special education84%
Limited English proficient (LEP)50%
Proficient in English82%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant80%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted67%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students91%
Female94%
Male89%
Black or African American72%
Asian97%
Hispanic86%
Multiracial94%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged77%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special education20%
Not special education92%
Limited English proficient (LEP)40%
Proficient in English94%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant91%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted86%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Students82%
Female84%
Male81%
Black or African American61%
Asian100%
Hispanic77%
Multiracial90%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Economically disadvantaged64%
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special educationn/a
Not special education83%
Limited English proficient (LEP)45%
Proficient in English86%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant82%
Gifted/talented99%
Non-Gifted73%
Bilingualn/a

Science

All Students89%
Female88%
Male89%
Black or African American65%
Asian100%
Hispanic81%
Multiracial93%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Economically disadvantaged70%
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special education40%
Not special education89%
Limited English proficient (LEP)47%
Proficient in English91%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant89%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted82%
Bilingualn/a

Social Studies

All Students83%
Female82%
Male84%
Black or African American46%
Asian100%
Hispanic70%
Multiracial93%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged55%
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special education40%
Not special education84%
Limited English proficient (LEP)16%
Proficient in English86%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant83%
Gifted/talented96%
Non-Gifted75%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Algebra I

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African American100%
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted100%
Bilingualn/a

Algebra II

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted100%
Bilingualn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a
Bilingualn/a

Chemistry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a
Bilingualn/a

English I Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a
Bilingualn/a

English I Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a
Bilingualn/a

English II Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a
Bilingualn/a

English II Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a
Bilingualn/a

English III Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

English III Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

Geometry

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted100%
Bilingualn/a

Physics

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

U.S. History

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

World Geography

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a
Bilingualn/a

World History

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

  • In 2010-2011, this school was rated "Academically Acceptable".
  • In 2009-2010, this school was rated "Academically Acceptable".
  • In 2008-2009, this school was rated "Academically Acceptable".

About the tests


Texas uses Accountability Ratings to indicate the overall performance of each school and district. The ratings are based on TAKS test results, dropout rates for grades 7 and 8 and school completion rates for grades 9 through 12. Schools and districts rated under standard accountability procedures are designated as Exemplary, Recognized, Academically Acceptable or Academically Unacceptable. Schools and districts rated under alternative education accountability (AEA) procedures are designated as either AEA: Academically Acceptable or AEA: Academically Unacceptable.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 43% 29%
Hispanic 30% 52%
Black 12% 13%
Asian or Pacific Islander 11% 4%
Two or more races 4% 2%
American Indian/Alaska Native N/A 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander N/A 0%
Source: TX Education Agency, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Limited English proficient (LEP) 6%N/A17%
Source: TX Education Agency, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Beginning teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Nurse(s)
PE instructor(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • ROBIN LOWE
Fax number
  • (512) 478-9133

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Library
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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1607 Pennsylvania Avenue
Austin, TX 78702
Phone: (512) 414-3214

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