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GreatSchools Rating

Cedar Hill High School

Public | 9-12 | 1694 students

 
 

Living in Cedar Hill

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $112,400. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,130.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

2 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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40 reviews of this school


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Posted March 2, 2006

I think Cedar Hill is an okay school. The ratio of students to kids is too high, however. My Sophmore has classes of 32 students or more to one teacher. Hard to be effective with that many kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 12, 2005

Cedar Hill High School is, in my opinion, unique. Here you will find kids from a mix of rural, inner city, and exclusive suburb neighborhoods. Truly. There are aspects of an urban downtown school side-by-side with children who go home to $400,000-and-up homes and also kids from old Cedar Hill families who are active in FFA. So there is something for everyone. There is an excellent AP and concurrent program - it is possible to graduate with almost two years worth of college courses. My children were both taking math and language arts classes not one but two grade levels ahead while still staying in classes with same age peers. No other public or private school that I'm aware of does this. My kids score wonderfully on standardized tests because of this. Opportunities for active kids seem to be wide open for a 5A school. Diversity is a big plus.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 27, 2005

This school is on steady decline. The students are very unfocused and the staff isn't all that great either. There are things in this school that need to be fixed, such as the bathroom stalls, but that seems to be a problem or not a proirity. They spend their money on other things. Not recommended.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted August 5, 2005

I am a parent and former teacher and feel like it is my duty to warn parents about this school. This school is out of control. The teachers are good, but the administrators are totally clueless and do not support the teachers like they should. The students have taken control and are running the school. Discipline doesn't exist. If you want your child to graduate and only read at an 8th grade level then Cedar Hill is the school for you. But if you want an education that prepares your child for college and for the real world, then avoid this school like the plague!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted July 1, 2005

Great school with excellent leadership.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 30, 2005

This school has gotten out of contol with the kids behaviors!! I do not recommend this school to parents!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 1, 2005

Not enough discipline in classrooms, teachers too busy handling disciplinary problems instead of teaching. Teachers and priniciples don't listen to kids' complaints. Yes you have to be in the cliques in order to get playtime on fields in sports, etc. The school system has gone down hill over the years, feel due to poor leadership, been a resident of CH for over 18 years.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 1, 2005

After attending grades 1-6 in a private school in Dallas, we moved to CH in order for our daughter to take advantage of what were at the time, great stats for the CH schools. Her private school offered superior education, respect and a disciplined atmosphere, but sadly lacked in a music program. We put her in CH at 7th grade, to be involved in the bands. It is very sad and quite amazing that in the years from 7th grade to now, as a senior, that the schools have deteriorated so drastically - regular gang violence/fights, complete lack of respect, and some of the worst test scores in the state. Now I wonder, was the band program worth it? Our other children will NOT be attending any CH schools and we are putting our home on the market and leaving CH. I have to agree with the former entries also.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 23, 2004

Teachers and administrators do not return phone calls, they're always 'out of the office' -no response to any questions about their discpline- they make the decisions and parents do not even have the right to know what happened or to conference with the teacher. Extreme Civil Rrights Vionlations! Place students in and out of classes without parental contact and make ARD changes illegally. If your kid is not in honors, forget it- lower kids pull down the scores too much. You can't get your kid into extracurricular aactivities unless the teacher likes him/her, even if you've spent hundreds on private musis lessons- the band director actually told me to my face he would not order music for just one instrument. (drums?) PTA and boosters! One big clique. Considering CHHS? Run! I am a teacher in another district, I would not work here and do not recommend it. I moved!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 3, 2004

This school is like going to any school in Oak Cliff or Pleasent Run. Many of the kids are not taught to respect authority and parents who expect that it is someone elses fault that these kids are such low achievers. My son and every one of his friends tell me the classes are a day care center for kids who do not want to learn. Instead they cause trouble and the teachers spend most of thier time trying to keep order. He takes honors classes and in those at least he is able to hear the teacher. This school district has plenty of problems. We need new leadership from the top down.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 17, 2004

Our child has attended Cedar Hill schools since kindergarten and we have sadly watched the steady decline of a once good school district. After a year of large group fights coupled with overcrowded classrooms and overwhelmed teachers we have decided this will be our child's last year in Cedar Hill schools. If your child is bright, well-behaved and motivated to do well academically, don't send them here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 10, 2004

This is my daughter's second year at CHHS and she has been blessed to be in all Honors classes. CHHS is not different than any other school; they all have their share of problems to work through. Before we point the finger at the current administration, I believe it is would be affable to give them an opportunity to correct their inherited problems; one year is not ample time to do this. In addition, I commend the Honors teachers and counselors based on my experience at CHHS. I have, however decided to move my daughter for one reason and one reason only: all of her coursework is Honors classes and the traditional school day simply creates too much academic stress than the A/B day schedule. It is a decision I regret but I know my daughter will continue to excel in her new school because of her experience at CHHS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 22, 2004

What AP and G/T courses? Any kid can self elect into the program! The teachers end up teaching to the low end kids instead of to the high achievers. My son's A/P science teacher told me there were less than four kids that really belonged in that class, and that he spends most of his time on discipline. He said there are several students in that class that can't even read! The teachers aren't the problem - that begins at the top with Administration. Safety is another huge problem. We've had it and are moving over the summer.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 17, 2004

I agree with the comments above related to Honors Classes. It's great if your child lands in them and also gets support and tracking if the child starts to fall behind. My experience is that they don't care enough to notify the parent or assure that the student gets into tutorials. Once the student fails he is left in the 'lower class' classes where they do not even get close to the same level of instruction. I have also witnessed first hand the sports over academics problem. They also have a discrepancy regarding the policy of facial hair in the sports department. If you look at the faces of the Varsity Teams there are mustaches and goatee's galore, yet the JV & Freshmen levels kids are being told not to come back unless they shave (Personal opinion of the coach reigns supreme and will be backed up if pursued higher.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 23, 2004

This is my son's 2nd year at CHHS. This year is better than the year before due to the addition of our new principal. His new ideas and new approaches to situations are a breath of fresh air. However, the school is still overcrowded. My son has 37 kids in his Health class. He also has to carry all of his books back and forth to class because he can't make it to his locker without being late, due to the overcrowded halls. This makes for an extremely heavy pack. We need an additional High School now, not in 3-4 years.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 10, 2003

I currently go to CHHS (i'm a junior), i think it is one of the best schools in the area. This year we have a new principal and things are going great. Yes, we love sports, but academics are still number one


Posted November 5, 2003

I agree that the AP and honors programs are great here, and fortunately my child is in these classes. However, the elective classes he attends with the average students, have many students with behavioral problems, and the teachers spend a majority of their time trying to discipline, instead of on the learning process. Something needs to be done in this area- those students should have stricter punishments, as it deters the others from learning. Kudos to the choir department- keep up the good work.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2003

Of the Highschools my children attended, I found this high school to be poorly ran and very sports minded. Sports were top priority and everything else was secondary. It seemed to me at that time the school was ran by the PE coaches as far as advancement and TAS scores was involved.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 31, 2003

I am not a parent I am an alumni I greatly appreciated my education from Ceadr Hill High school. I want to someday go back and teach there myself.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted April 22, 2003

We currently have a child who will graduate in 2004 from Cedar Hill High School and another in 2007. Cedar Hill provides an excellent education if you are in Honors or AP classes. The average student will fall through the cracks in this school district. The AP and Honors programs lean more to teacher recommendation than grades and far too much focus is given on the TAAS/TAKS tests on the elementary and intermediate levels. Honor Society is supposed to be based on academics, but you also need a teacher to recommend you to the program. New district policy of eliminating teaching positions in order to raise the level of entry teaching positions for minority teachers, we believe to be unethical. Teachers should be hired based on their teaching creditials, not whether or not a student can relate to them because of the colour of their skin. In a nut shell, if your student is lucky enough to be placed in honors and GT classes, they will be able to receive a well balanced, challenged and high quality education. Students on the 'average' level or below will be subject to unruliness in the classroom resulting in a disruptive learning atmosphere.


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 89% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 70% in 2011.

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 91% in 2011.

601 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
87%
Math

The state average for Math was 74% in 2011.

594 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
56%
Science

The state average for Science was 76% in 2011.

597 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
60%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 93% in 2011.

596 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 95% in 2013.

442 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
90%
Math

The state average for Math was 89% in 2013.

446 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
81%
Science

The state average for Science was 95% in 2013.

448 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
87%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 98% in 2013.

445 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students95%
Female94%
Male95%
Black or African American94%
Asiann/a
Hispanic96%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged93%
Special education69%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a

Math

All Students79%
Female76%
Male82%
Black or African American79%
Asiann/a
Hispanic82%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White84%
Economically disadvantaged77%
Special education54%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a

Science

All Students89%
Female88%
Male90%
Black or African American87%
Asiann/a
Hispanic96%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White88%
Economically disadvantaged87%
Special education59%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a

Social Studies

All Students97%
Female96%
Male98%
Black or African American96%
Asiann/a
Hispanic99%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged96%
Special education81%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

  • In 2010-2011, this school was rated "Academically Acceptable".
  • In 2009-2010, this school was rated "Academically Acceptable".
  • In 2008-2009, this school was rated "Academically Acceptable".

About the tests


Texas uses Accountability Ratings to indicate the overall performance of each school and district. The ratings are based on TAKS test results, dropout rates for grades 7 and 8 and school completion rates for grades 9 through 12. Schools and districts rated under standard accountability procedures are designated as Exemplary, Recognized, Academically Acceptable or Academically Unacceptable. Schools and districts rated under alternative education accountability (AEA) procedures are designated as either AEA: Academically Acceptable or AEA: Academically Unacceptable.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 78% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
22%

2012

 
 
n/a
Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 97% in 2013.

86 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 85% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
n/a
Chemistry

The state average for Chemistry was 84% in 2013.

505 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
n/a
English I Reading

The state average for English I Reading was 65% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
13%

2012

 
 
n/a
English I Writing

The state average for English I Writing was 48% in 2013.

133 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
11%

2012

 
 
n/a
English II Reading

The state average for English II Reading was 78% in 2013.

431 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
n/a
English II Writing

The state average for English II Writing was 52% in 2013.

437 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
n/a
English III Reading

The state average for English III Reading was 63% in 2013.

95 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
n/a
English III Writing

The state average for English III Writing was 42% in 2013.

95 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 86% in 2013.

433 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
n/a
Physics

The state average for Physics was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
39%
U.S. History

The state average for U.S. History was 73% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
33%
World Geography

The state average for World Geography was 75% in 2013.

79 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
10%

2012

 
 
n/a
World History

The state average for World History was 70% in 2013.

519 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
43%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Algebra I

All Students22%
Female23%
Male21%
Black or African American20%
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged17%
Not economically disadvantaged29%
Special education0%
Not special education26%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English20%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant22%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted20%
Bilingualn/a

Algebra II

All Students95%
Female93%
Male98%
Black or African American94%
Asian100%
Hispanic91%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged95%
Not economically disadvantaged96%
Special educationn/a
Not special education95%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant95%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted94%
Bilingualn/a

Biology I

All Students40%
Female33%
Male44%
Black or African American35%
Asiann/a
Hispanic43%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged32%
Not economically disadvantaged53%
Special education18%
Not special education47%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English40%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant40%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted40%
Bilingualn/a

Chemistry

All Students73%
Female74%
Male73%
Black or African American68%
Asian100%
Hispanic82%
Multiracial80%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Economically disadvantaged73%
Not economically disadvantaged75%
Special education30%
Not special education75%
Limited English proficient (LEP)83%
Proficient in English73%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Gifted/talented96%
Non-Gifted72%
Bilingualn/a

English I Reading

All Students13%
Female13%
Male14%
Black or African American10%
Asiann/a
Hispanic18%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White33%
Economically disadvantaged11%
Not economically disadvantaged18%
Special education6%
Not special education15%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English14%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant13%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted13%
Bilingualn/a

English I Writing

All Students11%
Female13%
Male9%
Black or African American6%
Asiann/a
Hispanic30%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White18%
Economically disadvantaged10%
Not economically disadvantaged12%
Special education5%
Not special education12%
Limited English proficient (LEP)0%
Proficient in English11%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant11%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted11%
Bilingualn/a

English II Reading

All Students62%
Female63%
Male62%
Black or African American58%
Asian100%
Hispanic74%
Multiracial67%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White66%
Economically disadvantaged61%
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Special education23%
Not special education65%
Limited English proficient (LEP)43%
Proficient in English63%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant62%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted62%
Bilingualn/a

English II Writing

All Students32%
Female35%
Male30%
Black or African American28%
Asian60%
Hispanic48%
Multiracial50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White25%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Not economically disadvantaged32%
Special education12%
Not special education34%
Limited English proficient (LEP)14%
Proficient in English33%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant32%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted33%
Bilingualn/a

English III Reading

All Students97%
Female100%
Male93%
Black or African American95%
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged97%
Not economically disadvantaged97%
Special educationn/a
Not special education97%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English97%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant97%
Gifted/talented96%
Non-Gifted97%

English III Writing

All Students84%
Female84%
Male85%
Black or African American79%
Asiann/a
Hispanic77%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged92%
Not economically disadvantaged80%
Special educationn/a
Not special education84%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English84%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant84%
Gifted/talented88%
Non-Gifted83%

Geometry

All Students72%
Female71%
Male73%
Black or African American67%
Asiann/a
Hispanic82%
Multiracial85%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Economically disadvantaged70%
Not economically disadvantaged75%
Special education22%
Not special education75%
Limited English proficient (LEP)100%
Proficient in English72%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant72%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted72%
Bilingualn/a

Physics

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

U.S. History

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

World Geography

All Students10%
Female9%
Male13%
Black or African American7%
Asiann/a
Hispanic27%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged11%
Not economically disadvantaged8%
Special education7%
Not special education11%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English11%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant10%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted10%
Bilingualn/a

World History

All Students50%
Female42%
Male57%
Black or African American44%
Asian78%
Hispanic58%
Multiracial53%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Economically disadvantaged48%
Not economically disadvantaged52%
Special education20%
Not special education51%
Limited English proficient (LEP)50%
Proficient in English50%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant50%
Gifted/talented80%
Non-Gifted48%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 69% 13%
Hispanic 20% 52%
White 7% 29%
Two or more races 3% 2%
Asian or Pacific Islander 2% 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander N/A 0%
Source: TX Education Agency, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Limited English proficient (LEP) 2%N/A17%
Source: TX Education Agency, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Beginning teachers 5%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


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1 Longhorn Boulevard
Cedar Hill, TX 75104
Website: Click here
Phone: (469) 272-2000

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