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GreatSchools Rating

Moises E Molina High School

Public | 9-12 | 1995 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
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2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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19 reviews of this school


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Posted April 28, 2012

The Staff actually takes time to help students with any issues or questions they have
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 29, 2008

I think the school is great! My kids have improved alot here and are very happy here!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 21, 2008

I go to Molina, currently a junior there, I have loved my entire time there. The students and teachers are really friendly and fun. I never realized that I could have such an amazing time there.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 23, 2008

My kids went to Duncanville High School...and it was a nightmare!! The kids there have nothing but racial tension! Teachers didn't care and noone seemed to want to help out in anyway! We moved to Molina and I know it was the best thing for them! Their grades have improved! The only thing that I do not stand for are some of the teacher! Some teachers put these kids down and are nothing but negative!!! If the teachers can't stand how the kids dress and talk then they need to get out of the teaching profession! Just because they dress in a way they don't like doesn't mean that the kids aren't smart!!!!!!!!!! I want to thank the Teachers and Coaches who do Believe in your students!!! We appreciate teachers who care !!!!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 6, 2007

My daughter is a Senior this year at Molina, she has been there since she was a Freshman. We hear about all the problems that the school may have but what High School doesn't have problems? I also believe that it does start at home. There are alot of parents that don't get involved, have to work all the time, etc. Parents need to make time for their kids. It is so important. Talk to the school, make calls to the teachers, communicate. Ask about homework assignments, behavior, tardiness, etc. If there are problems arising and you have that communication, alot of times you can correct the problems before it gets out of hand. My daughter loves her school and friends at Molina and she is a good student, her grades are great. To me this says alot about the school and teachers to make her feel this way about Molina.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 5, 2007

I am a Molina High school senior, I've attended Molina since my freshman year. I'll admit that the school has changed over the 4 years, but every school does. We've actually had a good year. There are ups and downs-but there is some in every school. Yeah there's fights and skipping, but that's really up to us, the students to do so. No one peer pressures us to do so. Parents might come on here and speak their mind, but the truth is they don't know what goes on around here. If their kids tell them something, that doesn't mean everything is true. They wouldn't tell their parents if they were to be the class clows, would they? And the teachers aren't bad. I've had 30 teacher in these 4 years, and I never had the guts to blame a teacher for my failure. Stop blaming and get involved.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 5, 2007

I've read all the comments about this school from angry parents and students. It's not as bad as they want you to believe. There is a lot of blame placed on teachers and administrators for actions of students, including fighting and skipping school. Who is really responsible for this? When parents take responsibility for their children, that's when children change. Teachers at Molina are not babysitters. They are teachers. If more parents would take an interest in what their kids do when they walk out of the house in the morning, there would be improvements. I'm not criticizing. I'm asking that parents try to get more involved in their children and stop making excuses for things that they, the parents, should be taking care.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted April 23, 2007

Molina with each year gets worse! some teachers dont even care for the students, they expect the students to teach themselves... All these cliques being formed is only causing problems. Everyday for the past 3-4 weeks i have seen students fighting out in the street across from the school and why... Because of these cliques. The one good thing about the school are the teachers who do care, and take their time to make sure every student learns.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2006

I am not very happy with Molina and their staff. I have tried to get a hold of my child's progress throughout the last two years. Everytime I call, I get the runaround. I ask for teachers voice mails or e-mails, I am told that they do not have these utilities to communicate with the parents. When I asked for my children's progress report, I was told to wait until report cards are out! By then it will be too late to help our children! Terrible all-around Communication! The registration paperwork asked when the student was married and how many children to they have. What does that say about this school?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 8, 2006

The school itself is not a problem, it's the staff that needs to pay additional attention to its students needs and predicaments. There is not enough information being passed out for students to regard at such as scholarship and college application deadlines and students cannot learn well if the instructors here don't start paying close attention. Both parents and students should receive news on what is going on it their school. More parents should join the PTA.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted June 10, 2006

Great school. Not very cutural mixed but still a very nice school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 15, 2006

Great school, but a lot of scandals go on here. The entire faculty is dedicated but find it hard to concentrate on their job when so much is going around. Administration is always changing and nothing seems to stay the same from one year to the next. The school itself is not kept up very well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 30, 2005

Molina seems to always have a great faculty who take a lot of interest in each & every student. I've been very impressed with the professionalism of the teachers at this school. They strive very hard to help each student become successful.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted July 14, 2005

I think this school is so unorganized and regret the day we moved to the DISD District. Kids skip school and parents don't get notified until the kid has skipped about 20 times. How ridiculous is that. Word of advise, don't send your kids to this school
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 13, 2005

This school has a lot of improvements to make within the student body. They need to improve on the way that the children behave and the lax way that they make the children responsible for their behavior. I'm sure that not all of the students have this type of attitude, but I feel as though alot of them don't really care about doing the work that it takes to succeed. It's much too easy to just do what needs to be done to get by. With some of the teachers, that's okay. I don't really feel that my child will be ready for college if this is where he graduates from. I know that it's up to the children to to do their best. But, here it very hard to do. There are too many students and too many distractions.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 22, 2004

I was pleasantly surprised, my child have never attended any DISD schools, she grew up in a totally different environment. I was very surprise at the acceptance from other students. The discipline from the principals and staff, they are pretty strict especially between classes. Overall it was a good school and most kids there are good kids. The only two things that I didn't like is that I'm a very involved parent and the school wasn't used to having parents like myself, at first they were a little uncomfortable w/ me, after a while they got used to me always calling and coming by.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 2, 2004

I belive this school is well balanced, a little of every personality, considering the reputation of the area I belive my daughter did very well in this school (a/b honor), I belive if a teacher makes 1 kid learn somenthing everyday she/he has acomplish what there are there to do.Its not about all, but about the ones that want to learn, and they are some there, I dont agree with that parent that made it sound like the teachers are wasting there time because there are no kids there that want to learn. Thank you to all the teacher that care.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 14, 2004

This school is highly recomended because the teachers have a step by step process in which the student is more likely to learn.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 3, 2004

If you want your child to be in an environment where the teachers are highly qualified, but the students don't care about learning...send them to Molina.


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 89% in 2011.

503 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
92%
Math

The state average for Math was 70% in 2011.

503 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
75%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 91% in 2011.

465 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
92%
Math

The state average for Math was 74% in 2011.

469 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
73%
Science

The state average for Science was 76% in 2011.

467 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
73%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 93% in 2011.

466 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 95% in 2013.

457 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
94%
Math

The state average for Math was 89% in 2013.

459 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
90%
Science

The state average for Science was 95% in 2013.

459 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
92%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 98% in 2013.

457 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
99%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students96%
Female96%
Male96%
Black or African American100%
Asiann/a
Hispanic96%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged96%
Special education80%
Limited English proficient (LEP)84%

Math

All Students91%
Female93%
Male89%
Black or African American100%
Asiann/a
Hispanic91%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged91%
Special education50%
Limited English proficient (LEP)73%

Science

All Students96%
Female95%
Male97%
Black or African American100%
Asiann/a
Hispanic96%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged96%
Special education60%
Limited English proficient (LEP)73%

Social Studies

All Students99%
Female99%
Male99%
Black or African American100%
Asiann/a
Hispanic99%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged99%
Special education80%
Limited English proficient (LEP)92%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

  • In 2010-2011, this school was rated "Academically Acceptable".
  • In 2009-2010, this school was rated "Academically Acceptable".
  • In 2008-2009, this school was rated "Recognized".

About the tests


Texas uses Accountability Ratings to indicate the overall performance of each school and district. The ratings are based on TAKS test results, dropout rates for grades 7 and 8 and school completion rates for grades 9 through 12. Schools and districts rated under standard accountability procedures are designated as Exemplary, Recognized, Academically Acceptable or Academically Unacceptable. Schools and districts rated under alternative education accountability (AEA) procedures are designated as either AEA: Academically Acceptable or AEA: Academically Unacceptable.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 78% in 2013.

395 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
71%
Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 97% in 2013.

155 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 85% in 2013.

505 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
83%
Chemistry

The state average for Chemistry was 84% in 2013.

462 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
n/a
English I Reading

The state average for English I Reading was 65% in 2013.

582 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
49%
English I Writing

The state average for English I Writing was 48% in 2013.

619 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
35%
English II Reading

The state average for English II Reading was 78% in 2013.

478 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
n/a
English II Writing

The state average for English II Writing was 52% in 2013.

482 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
n/a
English III Reading

The state average for English III Reading was 63% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
70%
English III Writing

The state average for English III Writing was 42% in 2013.

287 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
43%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 86% in 2013.

444 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
94%
Physics

The state average for Physics was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
U.S. History

The state average for U.S. History was 73% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
World Geography

The state average for World Geography was 75% in 2013.

512 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
76%
World History

The state average for World History was 70% in 2013.

474 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
n/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Algebra I

All Students71%
Female75%
Male67%
Black or African American69%
Asiann/a
Hispanic71%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged69%
Not economically disadvantaged83%
Special education45%
Not special education73%
Limited English proficient (LEP)58%
Proficient in English75%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant71%
Gifted/talented86%
Non-Gifted69%
Bilingualn/a

Algebra II

All Students96%
Female98%
Male94%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic96%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged96%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education96%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English96%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant96%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted95%
Bilingualn/a

Biology I

All Students82%
Female81%
Male83%
Black or African American76%
Asiann/a
Hispanic82%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged81%
Not economically disadvantaged85%
Special education53%
Not special education84%
Limited English proficient (LEP)68%
Proficient in English85%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant82%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted79%
Bilingualn/a

Chemistry

All Students81%
Female81%
Male80%
Black or African American86%
Asiann/a
Hispanic80%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged81%
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Special education50%
Not special education81%
Limited English proficient (LEP)62%
Proficient in English84%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant81%
Gifted/talented94%
Non-Gifted79%
Bilingualn/a

English I Reading

All Students54%
Female60%
Male49%
Black or African American43%
Asiann/a
Hispanic55%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged54%
Not economically disadvantaged56%
Special education15%
Not special education57%
Limited English proficient (LEP)32%
Proficient in English63%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant54%
Gifted/talented84%
Non-Gifted50%
Bilingualn/a

English I Writing

All Students29%
Female35%
Male23%
Black or African American40%
Asiann/a
Hispanic29%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantaged32%
Special education8%
Not special education31%
Limited English proficient (LEP)10%
Proficient in English37%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant29%
Gifted/talented68%
Non-Gifted24%
Bilingualn/a

English II Reading

All Students75%
Female79%
Male69%
Black or African American64%
Asiann/a
Hispanic75%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged74%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Special education22%
Not special education76%
Limited English proficient (LEP)47%
Proficient in English81%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant75%
Gifted/talented95%
Non-Gifted72%
Bilingualn/a

English II Writing

All Students33%
Female39%
Male25%
Black or African American29%
Asiann/a
Hispanic33%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged33%
Not economically disadvantaged36%
Special education0%
Not special education34%
Limited English proficient (LEP)12%
Proficient in English37%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant33%
Gifted/talented61%
Non-Gifted29%
Bilingualn/a

English III Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

English III Writing

All Students38%
Female47%
Male29%
Black or African American33%
Asiann/a
Hispanic38%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged37%
Not economically disadvantaged49%
Special educationn/a
Not special education38%
Limited English proficient (LEP)0%
Proficient in English40%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant38%
Gifted/talented67%
Non-Gifted34%

Geometry

All Students78%
Female79%
Male78%
Black or African American80%
Asiann/a
Hispanic78%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged78%
Not economically disadvantaged79%
Special education78%
Not special education78%
Limited English proficient (LEP)61%
Proficient in English82%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant78%
Gifted/talented95%
Non-Gifted75%
Bilingualn/a

Physics

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

U.S. History

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

World Geography

All Students74%
Female69%
Male80%
Black or African American60%
Asiann/a
Hispanic75%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged74%
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Special education28%
Not special education77%
Limited English proficient (LEP)46%
Proficient in English82%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant74%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted70%
Bilingualn/a

World History

All Students58%
Female55%
Male61%
Black or African American50%
Asiann/a
Hispanic58%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged57%
Not economically disadvantaged59%
Special education50%
Not special education58%
Limited English proficient (LEP)32%
Proficient in English63%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant58%
Gifted/talented84%
Non-Gifted54%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 94% 50%
Black 4% 13%
White 2% 31%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Asian 0% 3%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 2%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students PE instructor(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Arts & music

Music
  • Band

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • PE instructor(s)
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mark Ramirez
Fax number
  • (972) 502-1001

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • PE instructor(s)
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Cafeteria
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
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Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
Girls sports
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
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2355 Duncanville Rd
Dallas, TX 75211
Phone: (972) 502-1000

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