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GreatSchools Rating

Uplift Education-North Hills Prep

Charter | 6-8 | 460 students

 
 

Living in Dallas

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $66,900. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $850.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 8 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 8 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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67 reviews of this school


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Posted April 13, 2010

I love NHP, my son is a 6th grader and this is his firt year at NHP. He attended private school from K-5th grade. He is a A student in all of his classes, he is challenged academically. I find his teachers to be very nice and friendly. So glad I made the decision to apply to NHP.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 9, 2010

I am also pulling my daughter out of North Hills after one. It was a disappointment to say the least. All they care about is preparing for the TAKS test and disipline. The teachers are rude, they don't return students e-mails when they have questions about school. They get mad if a student does not understand an assignment and asks questions. My daughter received her English text book in January, 6 months into the school year, your supposed to get them in the beginning of the school year, not when school is almost out for the year! Bad academics, poorly organized school. Oh well, back to private schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 8, 2010

After 7 years at NHP I am pulling all my children out. It has definitely changed since Uplift took over. Poor facilities are one thing, but now the administration is actually harassing students. NHP has seen its best days.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 17, 2009

I'm from North Hills myself and have gone there since 6th grade. It's a good school for people with good morals and high academic grades but thats it. For parents who have rebellious or below average kids you will be overwhelmed. Literally. I've seen a straight A student from a regular public school become a barely C one. If you enjoy challenges and close teacher student relationships then this school is for you. However if you're looking to put your trouble making child here in order to get them to college I suggest going elsewhere. Peer pressure here is not about drugs and being cool, it's about grades. But other than that our school has a 100% ratio of student going to college. Oh and let's not forget the art program. Next to Booker T's Art school from the VASE scores this past year we were second.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 4, 2009

Mixed Felling From an Alumnus (cont.) Most people with an IB Diploma are basically overqualified for their Freshman Studies classes in college. These changes, in my opinion, were done to make the school grow at an unnatural rate, sacrificing actual academic quality for perceived academic prestige. I would not automatically rule out North Hills, but I would recommend caution. I don't know how much more it will change in the future. Be aware that if you think 'This place is too good to be true,' it is.


Posted April 2, 2009

i'm a student at north hills and i find it terrific i've learned a lot!
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 15, 2009

I am surprised to see the lack of valid arguments from parents towards the faults of the school. I have been a student since 2003 and will be graduating this year. Overall, the curriculum, although not always what I would consider fantastic, is challenging. The teachers are not afraid to give homework and come to expect more and more from students every year. The facilities are not top-grade, but I believe the school has done well with the limited funding that they have - in exception to the high school classrooms, which are vastly inferior to the elementary and middle school areas. The statements that the school is changing for the worst - are correct. Many fabulous teachers and administrators move or change career paths - and the school suffers greatly. The International Baccalaureatte Program offered, however, is the biggest plus of the school. Its teachers are still good, generally speaking.
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 14, 2008

The administration does not support or encourage quality teachers, and teacher turnover is extremely high. Most teachers are trying to do a good job but under very difficult working conditions and there is no system in place to deal with disruptive or unmotivated students. The administration is disorganized and tries to respond to problems instead of anticipating them and dealing with them in an effective and professional manner. The special ed department interferes too much with teachers who are trying to teach special needs kids to do the best they can and makes excuses fo them instead of encouraging them to learn.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted October 10, 2008

My kids have been in this school for 10 years. I have lived the rapid change NHP has experimented over the last 3 years and unfortunately things are changing for the worse. I would have to say that the new administration has lost contact with the parent community, making growth and size more important than quality academics.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 6, 2008

This school is a good alternative to your local school if you like uniforms and a safe environment for your children. The level of education provided is average, with only teaching to the TAKS test as the main educational goal. This school contuniues to re-invent the wheel when it comes to curriculum choices and standards. They can't keep teachers because their pay is well below regular districts and lack direction in their curriculum. The have lost their Kindergarten teams entirely, the last two school years due to lack of direction and mismanagement. If you have a sepcial needs student, avoid this school as they are viewed as second-class citizens. Save yourself the drive...
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 4, 2008

Academically this school pushes our boys in the right direction. There does seem to be an underlying current, however, of administration and staff trying to play doctor and label kids with ADD and ADHD diagnoses, push pyschological testing and expensive treatments for kids and attempt to convince parents that their children need to be medicated. They talk diversity from a racial standpoint, but have very little use for diversity on a child by child basis. We've seen that many of the staff would prefer 'Stepford Kids' - all having the same bland behavior and leaving no room for personality differences. If your kids are easily controlled with no opinions of their own then'll you will fit in just fine. If your kids are exuberant, energetic and are excited about things easily they may be labeled as difficult, willful, angry, in need of Special Education and medication.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 29, 2007

We are in our second year at North Hills. I have a 2nd grader and one in K. We love the teachers and staff. We send our kids there for their education, not the facilities, which by the way are just fine. We travel 40 minutes one way from our house and it is completely worth it. My kids are thriving and my 2nd grader is reading on a 7th grade level. We will continue to assesss the situation each year, but I can not foresee taking my children out of this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 16, 2007

As a student of 7 years now I can say that this school is losing direction. In previous years this has been a strong school with good teachers and students who perform well. The school has undergone an administration change and I know from personal experience that the quality of education and genuine concern for children parents desire for their kids is NOT reflected by the current head of upper school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 16, 2007

We are now in our 4th year at North Hills. We reassess this school every year, as we would any other - public or private - and to date, our kids are getting a great elementary education. Here s why: committed, competent, fun teachers; extracurricular activity opportunities (parents volunteer to coach soccer, basketball; there's a very active Girl/Boy Scouts program, after school classes for PSIA competitions and Math Olympiads); very involved families; an interesting, diverse student body; and on the whole, a genuinely nice group of kids. I m puzzled by the disgruntled individuals who resort to language like damage and pathetic . Families who do well at North Hills have high expectations not only for the school but also for their kids, and I believe that two-way commitment creates a very positive atmosphere at the school. All schools face challenges of some sort, but North Hills definitely works for our family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 15, 2007

The principle complaints against North Hills is that it lacks facilities and extra-curricular activities. Everyone should know that North Hills is a charter school and therefore gets 25% LESS funding than regular public school. I also think that not everyone is going to be a perfect fit with the school. No school is absolutely perfect, and North Hills has its fair share of faults. That being said, North Hills has an excellent curriculum and both the teachers and students who are concerned about education have done an excellent job of making do while North Hills is going through this transition period.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 26, 2007

I went there for 3 months. I then decided to go to a public school, and went into honors classes. I noticed that I had the same textbooks, but I was learning alot more at public school. I have so much fun at public school. I love attending football or basketball games, and I love the school experience. My mom says that she would never put another kid at north hills, because of the damage it did on me and my sister( who went to north hill s for 6 years- and then decided to go to public- and loved it!)


Posted September 24, 2007

I like North Hill, I don't really think the facility problem will affect the kids, Most of the kids in North Hill are ready to take the challenge academic, I had subbed North Hill for 3 years, I really think North Hill provides a good environment to those gifted students. Teachers also did their best to help the students under very limited budget. Not every kid fits North Hill, Before you transfer your kid to this school, you should make a research about this shool.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 15, 2007

This school is very high in academics, but very low in everything else. The exra curric. activities are pathetic, they don't give enough programs for kids. The school only has 2 janitors, which results in horrendoes messes around the campus. It was built on a ranch and smells like horse droppings and fertilizer, everyday. If your kids have allergies, Be aware! They are very hard on getting work done and will literaly hunt the kids and parents down to finish them. The gym is a sad excuse for a fitness facility, and there is no field for kids to use except to polo field. But what worries me the most are the rules against using the facilities. Is that permitable in our sivilized world to limit our bathroom needs?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 4, 2007

I have only been in this school for a year. In my limited experience (compared to the public school my child was in before), this school definitely lacks facilities. The school desperately needs more funds. Some substitute teachers are of poor quality. I was fortunate to have a good teacher.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 24, 2007

This school has undergone substantial change in the past year. It has a new administrative team (new head, new upper school, middle school and lower school principals, new college counselors, new IB coordinators, new registrar). Note that the administrative team that left over the past 18 months did so voluntarily. It also has averaged over 30% teacher turnover each year. According to the most recent state Academic Excellence Indicator System report, the average years of experience for teachers 6.1 and the average years a teacher has with the school is 2.4. It seems to have become a revolving door. I understand the school is ranked highly in Newsweek, but that is only based on number of AP and IB tests taken, not the pass rate of those tests. This school is certainly a school in transition.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 84% in 2011.

145 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
97%
Math

The state average for Math was 83% in 2011.

145 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 86% in 2011.

141 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
100%
Math

The state average for Math was 81% in 2011.

142 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
99%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 94% in 2011.

138 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 85% in 2011.

142 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Math

The state average for Math was 73% in 2011.

142 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
98%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2011.

141 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
95%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 95% in 2011.

140 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students97%
Female99%
Male95%
Black or African American100%
Asian99%
Hispanic94%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White94%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged97%
Special education100%
Not special education97%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English97%
Non-migrant97%
Gifted/talentedn/a

Math

All Students99%
Female100%
Male98%
Black or African American89%
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special education100%
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Non-migrant99%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students97%
Female98%
Male96%
Black or African American86%
Asian100%
Hispanic96%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White96%
Economically disadvantaged92%
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Special education67%
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English97%
Non-migrant97%
Gifted/talentedn/a

Math

All Students98%
Female99%
Male97%
Black or African American100%
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White89%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Special education86%
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English98%
Non-migrant98%
Gifted/talentedn/a

Writing

All Students99%
Female100%
Male99%
Black or African American100%
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
White96%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special education83%
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Non-migrant99%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African American100%
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talentedn/a

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African American100%
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talentedn/a

Science

All Students99%
Female98%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White95%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Special education100%
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant99%
Gifted/talentedn/a

Social Studies

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special education100%
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 71% in 2013.

152 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
96%
Math

The state average for Math was 74% in 2013.

151 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
99%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 77% in 2013.

151 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
97%
Math

The state average for Math was 71% in 2013.

108 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
98%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 70% in 2013.

150 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
96%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 84% in 2013.

149 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
99%
Math

The state average for Math was 77% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
99%
Science

The state average for Science was 75% in 2013.

150 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
99%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 63% in 2013.

150 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 78% in 2013.

159 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
99%
Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 97% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Chemistry

The state average for Chemistry was 84% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
English I Reading

The state average for English I Reading was 65% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
English I Writing

The state average for English I Writing was 48% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
English II Reading

The state average for English II Reading was 78% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
English II Writing

The state average for English II Writing was 52% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
English III Reading

The state average for English III Reading was 63% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
English III Writing

The state average for English III Writing was 42% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 86% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%
Physics

The state average for Physics was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
U.S. History

The state average for U.S. History was 73% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
World Geography

The state average for World Geography was 75% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
World History

The state average for World History was 70% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students94%
Female96%
Male92%
Black or African American90%
Asian99%
Hispanic82%
Multiracial89%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged94%
Not economically disadvantaged94%
Special education100%
Not special education94%
Limited English proficient (LEP)70%
Proficient in English96%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant94%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted94%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Students97%
Female97%
Male97%
Black or African American100%
Asian99%
Hispanic97%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged97%
Special education75%
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)90%
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant97%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted97%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students97%
Female96%
Male99%
Black or African American80%
Asian100%
Hispanic94%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged93%
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant97%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted97%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Students96%
Female93%
Male100%
Black or African American80%
Asian100%
Hispanic93%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged87%
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education97%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English97%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant96%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted96%
Bilingualn/a

Writing

All Students97%
Female98%
Male96%
Black or African American90%
Asian100%
Hispanic90%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Economically disadvantaged93%
Not economically disadvantaged97%
Special educationn/a
Not special education97%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English97%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant97%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted97%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students99%
Female99%
Male100%
Black or African American100%
Asian99%
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special education83%
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant99%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted99%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a
Bilingualn/a

Science

All Students98%
Female97%
Male100%
Black or African American86%
Asian99%
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged94%
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special education100%
Not special education98%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant98%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted98%
Bilingualn/a

Social Studies

All Students99%
Female99%
Male100%
Black or African American93%
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged94%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special education100%
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant99%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted99%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Algebra I

All Students99%
Female99%
Male99%
Black or African American93%
Asian100%
Hispanic95%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged93%
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special education83%
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant99%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted99%
Bilingualn/a

Algebra II

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a
Bilingualn/a

Biology I

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a
Bilingualn/a

Chemistry

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a
Bilingualn/a

English I Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a
Bilingualn/a

English I Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a
Bilingualn/a

English II Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a
Bilingualn/a

English II Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a
Bilingualn/a

English III Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

English III Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

Geometry

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Gifted100%
Bilingualn/a

Physics

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

U.S. History

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

World Geography

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a
Bilingualn/a

World History

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

  • In 2010-2011, this school was rated "Exemplary".
  • In 2009-2010, this school was rated "Exemplary".
  • In 2008-2009, this school was rated "Exemplary".

About the tests


Texas uses Accountability Ratings to indicate the overall performance of each school and district. The ratings are based on TAKS test results, dropout rates for grades 7 and 8 and school completion rates for grades 9 through 12. Schools and districts rated under standard accountability procedures are designated as Exemplary, Recognized, Academically Acceptable or Academically Unacceptable. Schools and districts rated under alternative education accountability (AEA) procedures are designated as either AEA: Academically Acceptable or AEA: Academically Unacceptable.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Asian or Pacific Islander 51% 4%
Hispanic 21% 52%
White 19% 29%
Black 6% 13%
Two or more races 3% 2%
American Indian/Alaska Native N/A 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander N/A 0%
Source: TX Education Agency, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Limited English proficient (LEP) 5%N/A17%
Source: TX Education Agency, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Beginning teachers 21%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


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1825 Market Center Boulevard
Dallas, TX 75207
Phone: (972) 501-0645

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