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GreatSchools Rating

Tanglewood Elementary School

Public | PK-5 | 722 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 5 ratings
2011:
Based on 10 ratings

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48 reviews of this school


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Posted April 13, 2014

The curriculum maintains high standards but is dated, and there is WAY too much emphasis on testing. The social dynamics (particularly among the parents) are terrible. A group of insiders run the PTA, which emphasizes fundraising and excludes newcomers and minorities. In a city of great diversity, parents fight to maintain this school's exclusivity. Redistricting may be the only way to change things for the better.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 6, 2013

TES claims that all our students are Gifted & Talented. However, research shows that students who are intellectually gifted need more emphasis on social and emotional needs since that is their area of deficit. TES is doing the opposite by providing dumbing down drill and kill performance based learning jn a rigid and oppressive environment which does not inspire students to love learning and to think for themselves. They are being taught NOT to think for independently. Instead of self directed project based learning which involves social interaction and emotional connections and relationship building, the students are being bullied by teachers into absolute compliance of what they want them to learn. My intellectually gifted son became so bored after two years that he developed ADHD in 3rd grade from being forced to sit still all day and bored to death. His behavior regressed and he lost interest in creative and imaginative activities as in the past. TES is producing Stepford like children - robots who have lost their spirit. The program at TES will prepare children for 3 things: 1. Workaholics w/ no relationships 2. Narcissists 3. Institution dependance Prison or Military
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 6, 2012

Our child is at at Tanglewood, and he struggles with various processing disorders which can lead to him having a hard time in a school setting. While we are getting him support outside of school, the school has been very involved in helping him succeed. The counselor, which the school DOES HAVE, along with the vice principal and his teacher were more than willing to set down before the year started so we could voice our experiences and concerns. The vice principal made sure he was placed with the most appropriate teacher and so far the year has been great! He has been challenged since day one, coming home with art projects, stories of the science and computer labs, games, songs, but importantly PRIDE in being a scholar. While the realities of being a public school in Texas influence the school, hence the focus on mastering the STAAR test and strict attendance policies, Tanglewood is striving to be the very best by providing the very best. And considering the cost of a comparable education at a private school, we are more than willing to do some fund-raising for our kids. No school is perfect but we have found Tanglewood to be welcoming and supportive even to a unique child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 31, 2012

The tellings of an excellent school are challenging, progressive curriculum, and tailoring instruction to the needs of the students listed as the top priority. Unfortunately, I found no trace of this in my experience with Tanglewood. There was way too much emphasis on fund raising and, contrary to what I have learned as an educator myself and am constantly being reminded by my principal, the teachers DO NOT individualize instruction based on students and how they learn best. A school's success can not be judged solely by the results of state testing. When a school's population consists completely of students who come from high socio-economic households with both parents, often highly educated, exemplary test results should be expected. It is NOT necessarily a testament to the quality of teachers at the school. I would love to see how well the teachers at Tanglewood would perform if they taught students that come from less than conventional households from the less desirable neighborhoods.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2012

Tanglewood remains the best elementary school in Fort Worth, public or private. As with any group of several hundred students you will find a handful of parents who are just not satisfied. Maybe they would be happier elsewhere, but I suspect they would rather complain and are just good at finding fault and laying blame. For every negative review I'm sure there are 99 parents who LOVE this school, the teachers and the staff but have not taken the time to post a review. For the parent saying there is not a counselor, I guess her office is hard to find, since it is the FIRST DOOR when you walk into the main office and is clearly marked. Public school is a place to get an education, there is not enough money to have a team of counselors to handle severe mental health issues that should be handled by a private psychologist, social worker or minister. Also, if your child is doing 2 hours of homework a night you child probably needs a tutor, we have a 5th grader and he has never had more than an hour except when rare special projects are due.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 28, 2012

I enrolled my son at Tanglewood spring semester, following a divorce and relocation. I was shocked - no support services in this school of 700, not one counselor. His social emotional adjustment was fragile, but the only thing his teacher was interested in was how he would score on the STAAR test. This is a large "industrial" school of 700+ where conformity is the agenda and the children's creativity and love of learning is stiffled by the drill of boring test curriculum. It is so arrogant to hang a banner out front to brag about Exemplery test status if the children are bored and miserable and their needs are not being met. And the homework is disgraceful - 8 hrs sitting all day - 2 hrs boring homework. Dismiss primary grades K-2 at 2:00 to avoid the "cattle call". Please parents, we must get organized and insist that support services are provided to all the students, that teachers are trained in social skills and mutual respect, and improve the curriculum to include Blooms Taxonomy of higher learning skills. The physical appearance of this school looks good. The performance is exemplary; however, The emotional climate is ghetto.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 27, 2012

Incredibly disappointed with this school. I had high hopes based on reputation, reviews, etc., but they were misleading. We dealt with social issues with my child and the teacher as well as the administration failed to do anything about it. I agree with previous posters about the PTA. But the ironic thing is that the PTA is so active w/activities & fundraising, yet they seem to have little to no voice when it comes to the most important elements about the school -- teachers, curriculum, etc. I've felt very much on the fringe w/the administration even though I volunteered. Almost as if you're welcome there if you're going to be a robot and keep your opinions to yourself; otherwise, move along. If you have the money, I would seriously consider the private schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 9, 2011

This is in response to the review posted on September 4, 2011. Why would a parent NOT be a member of the PTA. Not being a member of the PTA would be a disadvantage at ANY school. Tanglewood does not receive any Federal funds, so the PTA is integral in making sure the teachers and students have all they need to not only succeed, but excel.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 4, 2011

Tanglewood is a great school and seems more of a private school. The teachers are great. I have one child in Tanglewood and my other child has already moved on to middle school. Overall, it is a good school, but not being a PTA member is a huge disadvantage.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 28, 2011

This is in response to the May 12th and May 24th post. I agreee that no teacher should pressure a parent to medicate their child nor should we as parents not talk positive about our child's teacher. But our children are with their teachers more hours in the day and then with us. My son was miserable and I repeatedly told him that the teacher is "the boss" and as a teacher myself, I felt I needed to support her. It wasn't until he had trouble sleeping and I could hear him talking in his sleep, that I realized there was a problem. After seeing a therapist, I requested a teacher change because his anxiety and fear of doing something wrong in class was effecting him. I feel guilty for not listening to my son and acting sooner. There is no excuse for a teacher who humilates and shames a child. Tanglewood has a lot of work to do to include the child with ADD, speech concerns, dyslexic, non-caucasian and the child that doesn't fit in the box of this "all our students are gifted and talented" school. If Tanglewood is unable to accomodate for the above, they should be designated as a school for the gifted, so another child won't have to suffer and lose their love of learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 3, 2011

We are extremely happy with the school. My kindergartener really liked going to school and learning new things. He was challenged every day and was banded with other high achieving kids. Highly recommend it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 18, 2011

We are parents who have experienced both the private and public side of education in Fort Worth. I would agree that they are not the same. Each side has its strengths and weaknesses. Tanglewood is as close as you can get to private without spending an arm and a leg. Yes, there is a lot of benchmarking in public education. It can be very insightful. They do not badger all children to take medication and if a parent is involved in his/her child's education as a teammate to a teacher it can be a very positive win/win for all involved. We are proud of our children and Tanglewood. The world demands a lot of children today. It is our job to provide the best education we can and to support and love them along the way.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 24, 2011

this school, because of its high rating perhaps, teaches almost solely to the test. They pressure kids constantly on this, to the point that my straight 'A' student has been getting test anxiety over timed tests! I do volunteer, and parent involvement is great. Great families, but curriculum is outdated/ nothing special or progressive. Classes are above state limits, classrooms are crowded, homework is out of control. Also fundraising is CONSTANTLY pushed in your face/ down your throat, but perhaps this is to be expected in this type of demographic. Overall a disappointment, as we moved in this area just to be in the district, and were expecting a really great school. Also, although I do not have a learning disabled student, I find it WRONG and lazy to design a public school that cannot accomodate these students properly.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 12, 2011

Agreed last reviewer!! To bring up or hint around that a 6 yr old boy should be medicated is unethical and irresponsible. Which in my case is what is happening. I plan to reach out to a parent/student advocate group. I am involved with the school, and have had meetings with both the teacher and principle, and Im sorry to say I ve had a rough experience. Communication is lacking. This is our first year, I was so excited and ready to develop a coalition with my sons teacher but clearly it is not the Tanglewood way. I have not heard ONE positive thing about my son from his teacher, so I have to lie to him and tell him "your teacher says your so smart', or " Your teacher told me your doing great in math". Bottom line .....if you want your kid to get "The Beat Down", or want your child to become a medicated zombie then this is the place.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 7, 2011

I have mixed feelings about Tanglewood, I have two children that have gone through the school. Our first child is the perfect student. Perfect test scores, self directing, alway seated quietly, never any trouble. Always with her nose in a book. If that describes your child you will have an amazing experience. However, if your child does not fit squarely in that box, they will have an entirely different experience. I could write a book on what happens next if your child is NOT the PERFECT student and especially if you have a boy.(For some teachers that alone constitutes ADHD. You will hear that conversation a lot, by the way. It is a favorite topic of both the teachers and parents.) My advise is to be YOUR child"s advocate. Most of this stems from the pressure that Tanglewood does teach to the tests they give each year. Overall Tanglewood is a very good school, with excellent staff and leadership. There are of course bad eggs in the group and you will know them by their reputation. Parent involvement is extraordinary here. it is a blessing and a curse and it can be intimidating, just jump in. Find something you are willing to do. It benefits YOUR child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 2, 2011

Thanks to all teachers. My kid know reading and writing . Husain Alayashi 3rd gread Ms Barcus
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 1, 2011

Tanglewood is a great school, with a great community of teachers, administrators and parents who support classroom learning and activities. It is not the best school for mentally challenged children, or parents who want a school that does everything for them. In order for your child to succeed here, you must get involved as a parent, as 99% of us do.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 23, 2010

This is our first year in Fort Worth and everybody, from the administration to the parents, has been very supportive. Teachers are very caring. The school offers more extracurricular activities that many schools are not able to offer, and many of those activities are funded by the PTA. The new Principal is great and always willing to listen to any concern and/or suggestion. I could have not found a better school for my children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 25, 2010

I terribly miss the old administration - but of course, truely accept the new principal but the ap isn't quite the same - but perhaps in time will get there. I wish the past administrators well and truely hope that get the recognition they deserve - especially Ms. Ratcliff - had the heart for children and understanding for all parents and situations. I feel fortunate to have been in that administration and still continuing our elementary experience with the new administrators. A very positive experience overall.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 21, 2010

I LOVE IT!!!! My kids on the other hand think all of the children that attend are very stuck up and spoiled...but that is just THEIR opinion as 'Free lunch program' kids. We may not be wealthy enough to keep up or participate in all of the awesome events...but I have found the people to be very friendly and accepting...ESPECIALLY the wonderful school councelor, Mrs. Curtis. :))
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 89% in 2011.

130 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
99%
Math

The state average for Math was 87% in 2011.

130 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
96%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 85% in 2011.

95 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Math

The state average for Math was 88% in 2011.

95 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
100%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 90% in 2011.

95 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 82% in 2011.

106 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Math

The state average for Math was 81% in 2011.

106 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Science

The state average for Science was 87% in 2011.

106 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%

Math

All Students99%
Female98%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant99%
Gifted/talented100%

Writing

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%

Science

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 79% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
98%
Math

The state average for Math was 69% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
95%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 72% in 2013.

124 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
99%
Math

The state average for Math was 68% in 2013.

123 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
98%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

123 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
99%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 77% in 2013.

124 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
99%
Math

The state average for Math was 75% in 2013.

125 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
99%
Science

The state average for Science was 73% in 2013.

124 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
98%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students99%
Female100%
Male98%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged80%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant99%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted99%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Students94%
Female98%
Male90%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic80%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White94%
Economically disadvantaged60%
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Special educationn/a
Not special education94%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English94%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant94%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted91%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students99%
Female98%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian80%
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged86%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant99%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted99%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Students99%
Female100%
Male99%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged86%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant99%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted99%
Bilingualn/a

Writing

All Students99%
Female100%
Male99%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged86%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant99%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted99%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African American100%
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted100%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African American100%
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted100%
Bilingualn/a

Science

All Students98%
Female98%
Male98%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged75%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant98%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted97%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

  • In 2010-2011, this school was rated "Exemplary".
  • In 2009-2010, this school was rated "Exemplary".
  • In 2008-2009, this school was rated "Exemplary".

About the tests


Texas uses Accountability Ratings to indicate the overall performance of each school and district. The ratings are based on TAKS test results, dropout rates for grades 7 and 8 and school completion rates for grades 9 through 12. Schools and districts rated under standard accountability procedures are designated as Exemplary, Recognized, Academically Acceptable or Academically Unacceptable. Schools and districts rated under alternative education accountability (AEA) procedures are designated as either AEA: Academically Acceptable or AEA: Academically Unacceptable.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 82% 31%
Hispanic 8% 50%
Asian 4% 3%
Black 3% 13%
Two or more races 3% 2%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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3060 Overton Park W
Fort Worth, TX 76109
Website: Click here
Phone: (817) 814-5900

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