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GreatSchools Rating

West University Elementary School

Public | K-5 | 1217 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 5 ratings
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 5 ratings

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36 reviews of this school


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Posted September 15, 2014

I've never seen a note from the administration inviting us parents to talk to them. It's not easy to find someone to talk to at WUES. If you are brave enough to reach out to an administrator, don't expect a warm welcoming meeting. This school is great if you never have concerns or questions or if your child is in Vanguard but not for other kids. That is why you see the huge difference in reviews on this site. Also, this is not a school for working parents. A working parent cannot hope to get the preferential treatment that non-working parents who can volunter recieve.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 7, 2014

We spent one year in a GT Kindergarten class before moving our child to another school. It was a rough year for many reasons, some of which are reflected in the negative comments here including mounds of homework and special projects that are not age or developmentally appropriate, obvious ranking of children, and competiveness between parents. Your best bet is if your Kindergartener is an older age who can already read. They need to be talkative, and externally motivated. Introverted and shy children will be overwhelmed or may be overlooked. There are positives about the school including involved parents but overall the negatives made the school not a fit for our child. We were na ve enough to think living in this neighborhood ensured a great education, but it is just not that simple anymore. It took a lot of personal research, speaking with educators, and visiting other schools for me to come to understand that the problems with WUES are complex. I certainly now understand teaching to the test. Our new school has a wonderful art program, science labs, Spanish and music. And it is a nurturing environment for kids to explore.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 30, 2014

We moved to this neighborhood for "the schools". There is a lot more to a school than the stars posted on the wall outside (and they get those from focusing MONTHS on practicing the tests!). When the principal threatens to "walk out" if the parents get a vote, then yes, that's a problem. The school in General has no art, no music, punishes by eliminating recess some days. The lunch ladies blow whistles to quiet the kids, silent lunches are the norm (not just during testing) and kids are put on stage (humiliation) when misbehaving at lunch (talking too loud)....I have witnessed this numerous times. The overall attitude at the school is sadly militant. Kids wet their pants because they are denied a bathroom break. It was more than any family should tolerate. Why are there 1200+ kids here? Because we all hear how wonderful WUES is. You don't see it for what it is until your children are crying about going every morning - and you are the room mom and get a front row seat to what's going on up there. No inspiration. A bunch of worksheets, worthless homework, test training....sucking the love for learning out of our children. Think hard before putting your kids here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 29, 2014

West University Elementary is awful. The school is a big promoter of the parents doing the projects for the kids based on the Texas History Fair with the trifold the students had on display. It was obvious that the parents did the work last year not the students. I am a teacher and I can identify student work vs fourth or second grade work. The second grade Science fair was not any better. As far as the principal he has demonstrated inappropriate behavior discussing issues with parents with the local barber using the parents name. When my children report back and tell me what the barber heard from the principal there is a problem.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 1, 2014

The negative comments about this school are counter intuitive. Why do over 1200 people continue to chose this school when comparable schools have approx 70. ? Why do people pay $100 a square ft. for mere dirt to be zoned to this school. True, the school's after school program is inferior to others. I'm sending my kid here next year because the Principal - whom I've never met - has the guts to create all GT classes and then rank them so that the brightest in are classes with the brightest, not those who passed the GT test with a real score of 60 (another issue). Other principals are worried about how this segregation of students may affect their overall test scores, performance of those who poorer performers in the classroom or the racial quotas that they deny. It seems this guy just wants each kid to reach full potential. Sadly, a lost priority in public secondary ed.


Posted September 26, 2013

It is a shame that a parent would "bash" a school when they are mad at someone. It is important to be factual. Here are the true facts: 1. WUES has 3 administrators and 1 Inst. Co. Three of them have their masters and have been with the district for 29 plus years. I would say they were more than qualified. 2. ELL policies are set by state and federal governments. Take your complaints to them. The school only follows policy. 3. The principal has no political aspirations- he is about to retire! The magnet coordinator has multiple jobs. She is the VIPS, Vanguard and Testing coordinator. She keeps the school calendar and sets up for all events. She is also the PTO liason and is an administrator over 3 grade levels. If she is aggressive ( which I have never seen in 6 years) it is because parents in WU don't like the word no! 4. Last,but not least - the ethnicity % is not set up by the school. It is their zoned area make-up. The school holds 1250 students and only 50 students come from outside of that zone. A parent should be a positve builder of their child's school. The school listens and updates its curr. on a yearly basis. The vanguard program is very impressive .
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 16, 2013

West U is a large (+\- 1200 students) elementary school in a GIGANTIC District (>210,000 students). The school is overwhelmingly WHITE (see data on HISD website) and most come from families with plenty of resources. West U offers ELL only for non Spanish speakers. Many families walk to school in the morning and socialize in the playground in the afternoon. That said, the school has been following a formula for the past -who knows how many- years that is overly outdated and inappropriate for learning in the 21st century. The principal is a figurehead who seems to view his position as more political than pedagogical. He hardly makes himself available to parents or students. The magnet coordinator (why the position exists, nobody can explain because the school is SUPER over subscribed -which supports the idea that Houston's magnet school system is primarily a way of selectively segregating schools.) is aggressive and under qualified for the leadership she assumes. The school runs like clockwork (part of the formula). Students must be silent in the halls, form lines, practice most of the year for exams. Many teachers are good, some are novices & a few are burned out. 0 Creativity Zone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 26, 2013

Unfortunately the quality of this school has deteriorated over the years. Not all but many of the teaching staff use reprimanding methods that hinder children to thrive. Very disturbing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 27, 2013

This is a wonderful school. As a dad of 3 kids that currently attend the school, I've noticed that the quality of the teachers, students and parents is top-notch. The large number of sharp, active, dedicated stay-at-home moms (ex-lawyers, doctors, professors etc) provides a big boost to the school programming, support, etc and makes the school one of the best out there. In addition the school consistently ranks at the very top on statewide measures, competitions (Odyssey of the Mind, spelling bee, etc).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 13, 2011

After reading these reviews it is hard to ignore some of the complaints & criticisms by several parents. This is a very good school with many excellent teachers and a strong PTO, but agree with statements made by several about the emphasis on test scores, little administrative interaction and communication with parents, hiring of brand-new teachers with no experience and poor track record with kids (but a parent who works in HISD admin), and a lot of political maneuvering. Many teachers who have been complained about repeatedly remain in their jobs b/c the deliver good test scores each year. I do strongly disagree about the PTO criticisms and community service projects done throughout the year. The PTO is active, organized and raises a tremendous amount of money that goes directly back into the school. The community service projects are for excellent causes and at least show some of the kids who live in a bit of a bubble that there are many people in need outside the perimeter of our neighborhood. I do also agree with one reviewer that it is really sad that this school has no foreign language ancillary class and a pitiful art and music program. Overall, a good school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 31, 2011

I find it interesting that the person reviewing West University Elementary School could say in such an anecdotal manner with no evidence to back such negative statements. The TAKS, Standford scores, and the number of placement into high ranking middle schools are quantitative evidence of the academic excellence of the school. The PTO is active. Almost 82% of all money earned goes back to the students in way of teaching material, curriculum enrichment, or materials for the classroom. The constant preparation by teachers to help students after hours to help tutor kids (NON-PAYING Tutorials) are evident all through the year. Again this quantitative evidence of that the cooperative effort of teachers, administration and parents are doing things right at West University Elementary School.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 11, 2011

My son has been in West U for K & 1st grade and we have had a great experience at the school. We are glad that we have access to such good education through the public school system. Yes - it is not perfect but it is a good school academically and socially for my child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 10, 2011

Excellent school, great teachers and strong PTO. My son excelled at West U in less than a year. He is almost finished with kindergarten. He started at reading level 6 and now is reading chapter books. His math is 1st grade level and tested well in all subjects in Stanford. His teacher is very responsive and caring. West U is named the 5th best schools (2nd in HISD after TH Rogers) by 2011 Houston Chronicle Best schools in the Houston and vicinity areas. Most grades tested at 99% in almost all subjects. This is one of the best public elementary schools by far. This is the largest elementary in the HISD and there is still a long waiting list every year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 20, 2011

This school is ALL HYPE. Education is poor; PTO is overzealous; The monthly fundraisers are ridiculous; the teachers are superficial and lack passion for teaching. All of the children (including mine... now) are tutored by one of the West U. teachers at the library across the street each day after school. It is incredible to think such an "outstanding school" requires such intense after-school preparation. Paperwork and email OVERLOAD. I am flooded day after day with either emails from the class mom's re: a fundraiser or paperwork in my child's folder re: anything other than her education. My child literally comes home with a folder FULL of paper each week; which, has nothing to do with her education. A huge portion of fundraising must go towards thousands and thousands of pieces of colored paper AND COPY MACHINES. Oh my... Frankly, the teachers are all very young and pretentious and there is a very high turn-over rate. Not to mention, the front office staff is incredibly rude. The school is beautiful but your child's education is not a priority.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 7, 2010

I am not sure how anyone got the impression that there is no homework in K. My child has had plenty of homework in K. He has also had to complete projects and prepare for oral book reports to the class complete with tri-board. I've been very happy with the teachers. I have two children. The other child is in 2nd grade. The PTO is very active and the facilities are great.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

Good education while it's like one big family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 24, 2009

My daughter went to kindergarten there after coming from Galena Park ISD. I thought I was sending her to a better school. Yes the actiities are good there, but was not happy with how her education developed. I feel she learned more from her PreK school at GPISD. Her teacher did not giver her homework. i strongle believe she could have been better challenged. The parents didn't mind of course I spoke to some and some preferred no homework so that they did not have spend time on that after work. Sigh! I think their Gifted tests are a joke. In one year she was required to take two. You don't need a test to check if your child is gifted. You know it by having an extremely smart child. Their gifted child tested just proves that some kids are a bit more mature than others. Glad I left.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 14, 2008

WUE is a very good public school with mostly devoted and outstanding teachers who are limited by the emphasis on test scores and standardized curricula. The library is outstanding. Instruction in the music and art 'ancillary periods' is poor. There are very limited enrichment activities during and after school. There is a small invitation only track team and a newsletter club. The PTO runs a math club and a 'Name that Book' club. Foreign Language, Robotics, and Science after-school programs are run by private companies and are costly. The school is safe and has high standards for discipline. There is a very active PTO and a high level of parent involvement. Teachers are very accessable - the administration is less accessable.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 17, 2008

Curriculum is strong, but no foreign language, music is poor. Third and fifth grades are less challenging, fourth grade is extreme. Too much time spent teaching to the standardized tests. Respectfulness is not always shown among teachers, students, parents, and staff. Male students place great emphasis on athletics with teasing at recess. Some grades have issues with girl bullying. Majority of parents voted for uniforms, but it has never happened. Books needed to complete homework and binders are heavy, but the school banned rolling backpacks. Teacher turnover is high and teachers report not feeling supported by administration who focus on test scores and seem unresponsive to parental concerns. Some classes have nearly 30 students. Electrical, heating, and A/C problems plague the school. Students often have silent lunch and some classes are punished by missing recess. Food is fair, milk sometimes runs out or is expired! Doors are often propped open.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 25, 2007

This is a great school as long as you aren't a single parent who needs assistance. With PTA meetings held at 8 and 9 AM it is obvious that they are not open to assisting the everyday working parent. The teachers are helpful but can be extremely judgmental and are quick to label a child. If you're an African American who isn't a stay at home parent or have an extremely flexible work schedule, I suggest you look on. They are not going to work with you. They pretend in words to care, but the actions toward working with a parent tell another story. Even feedback is a challenge.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 89% in 2011.

175 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
99%
Math

The state average for Math was 87% in 2011.

175 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
99%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 85% in 2011.

155 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
98%
Math

The state average for Math was 88% in 2011.

155 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
99%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 90% in 2011.

154 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 82% in 2011.

147 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
99%
Math

The state average for Math was 81% in 2011.

147 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Science

The state average for Science was 87% in 2011.

147 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
99%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students99%
Female100%
Male99%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special education100%
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)100%
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%

Math

All Students99%
Female100%
Male99%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special education100%
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)100%
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African American100%
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special education100%
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)100%
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African American100%
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special education100%
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)100%
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%

Writing

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African American100%
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special education100%
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)100%
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African American100%
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special education100%
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African American100%
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special education100%
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%

Science

All Students99%
Female99%
Male100%
Black or African American100%
Asian95%
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special education100%
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant99%
Gifted/talented100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 79% in 2013.

210 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
97%
Math

The state average for Math was 69% in 2013.

210 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
94%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 72% in 2013.

192 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
99%
Math

The state average for Math was 68% in 2013.

191 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
93%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 71% in 2013.

190 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
98%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 77% in 2013.

144 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
97%
Math

The state average for Math was 75% in 2013.

144 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
97%
Science

The state average for Science was 73% in 2013.

141 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
98%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students100%
Female100%
Male99%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special education100%
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%
Not Gifted99%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Students98%
Female96%
Male99%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic94%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Special education100%
Not special education97%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant98%
Gifted/talented99%
Not Gifted96%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students98%
Female99%
Male98%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic96%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Special education89%
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant98%
Gifted/talented100%
Not Gifted96%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Students91%
Female89%
Male92%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic68%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged92%
Special education67%
Not special education92%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English91%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant91%
Gifted/talented98%
Not Gifted76%
Bilingualn/a

Writing

All Students98%
Female99%
Male98%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic96%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Special education100%
Not special education98%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant98%
Gifted/talented100%
Not Gifted96%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students99%
Female100%
Male99%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged99%
Special educationn/a
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)80%
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant99%
Gifted/talented100%
Not Gifted98%
Bilingualn/a

Math

All Students99%
Female99%
Male100%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education99%
Limited English proficient (LEP)100%
Proficient in English99%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant99%
Gifted/talented100%
Not Gifted98%
Bilingualn/a

Science

All Students98%
Female97%
Male99%
Black or African Americann/a
Asian100%
Hispanic88%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Special educationn/a
Not special education98%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Not migrant98%
Gifted/talented100%
Not Gifted94%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

  • In 2010-2011, this school was rated "Exemplary".
  • In 2009-2010, this school was rated "Exemplary".
  • In 2008-2009, this school was rated "Exemplary".

About the tests


Texas uses Accountability Ratings to indicate the overall performance of each school and district. The ratings are based on TAKS test results, dropout rates for grades 7 and 8 and school completion rates for grades 9 through 12. Schools and districts rated under standard accountability procedures are designated as Exemplary, Recognized, Academically Acceptable or Academically Unacceptable. Schools and districts rated under alternative education accountability (AEA) procedures are designated as either AEA: Academically Acceptable or AEA: Academically Unacceptable.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 67% 29%
Asian or Pacific Islander 16% 4%
Hispanic 10% 52%
Two or more races 5% 2%
Black 2% 13%
American Indian/Alaska Native N/A 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander N/A 0%
Source: TX Education Agency, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Limited English proficient (LEP) 2%N/A17%
Source: TX Education Agency, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Beginning teachers 7%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

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School basics

School start time
  • 7:45 am
School end time
  • 3:00 pm
School Leader's name
  • Mr John Threet
Fax number
  • (713) 667-8514
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

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3756 University Blvd
Houston, TX 77005
Website: Click here
Phone: (713) 295-5215

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