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GreatSchools Rating

The Woodlands High School

Public | 9-12 | 4131 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
Based on 4 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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48 reviews of this school


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Posted January 14, 2014

The Woodlands High School does not accommodate anyone with Learning disabilities unless the child is actually severely physically disabled. Otherwise there are too many students to accommodate special Learning needs. The Conroe ISD is supposed to be an INTEGRATED LEARNING district, but that is just not possible with the teaching to test methods they use instead. I would say to try College Park High School instead as they are a more nurturing school environment than TWHS. I know they offer a better opportunity for people who need more assistance as their leaders insist upon it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 13, 2013

i recently attended a jv football game 09/12/2013 at your facility i was shocked at the handicapped parking, and the distance from parking to seating. as my husband is disabled we wont be attending any other functions at this facility. also there were no lights in either womens or mens restrooms. these issues need to be addressed


Posted June 6, 2013

I am sure that the woodland high school is quality programs and teaching and I will sent my son to the school after summer. Submitted by parent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 31, 2013

The most recent poster has my school nailed on how bad it is here. I come from a great family, moderate income level, have a pretty awesome car, and came in new at the start of my jr yr... The counselors told me this... If you don't sign up for extracurricular activities, ie clubs, sports (good luck!), band, then you will have a difficult time at the school. So I signed up for lots of clubs since I didn't qualify for their stellar basketball, football, baseball, or tennis club. So I go to the club meetings and since I don't already know anybody there, I'm SHUNNED!! So I do this in about 4 meetings, looking forward to meeting at least one new friend and I am so depressed that I have to deal with eating by myself and not one person will come and sit by me. I will look up and smile and they go sit somewhere else... I hate this place now. My parents told me it was going to be a great school, but btwn the teachers and their lack of abilities to teach, and the administration's difficulty with handling the chaos of unhappy kids there, there is no way someone like me, a good looking, nice, good kid can be happy here. All of the SERIOUS $ in this town and nothing to show 4 it. I'm :'(.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 23, 2013

I have lived in New England, Atlanta, The Midwest, Central States, and now Houston. This is absolutely the WORST school to acclimate your child to. Unless you are filthy rich, a jock, cheerleader, or highly popular, your new student IS NOT WELCOME HERE by others. The "clicks" are everywhere, and forget joining clubs to get to know kids - the clicks are already there too. The size is absolutely outrageous and unless your child already comes from a large school (3000+ kids), I highly suggest looking elsewhere. My neighbors have lived all over the world in many cases, and they also said this was the worst school ever to get their kids to feel included and meet others. The school throws the clubs at kids and expects them to just "go get it!" If you are are a down-to-earth person and your kids have any kind of heart, move somewhere else! THIS PLACE IS NOT, I REPEAT, NOT FOR YOU! We are now homeschooling, and relieved to be doing so.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 12, 2012

I really like this high school... It's just amazing. I really like th teachers. And if you're in band and you're moving to the woodlands, this school has probably the best band ever. I'm in this band and I actually enjoy this band. It's fun and chill. This year, the band got 1st place in BOA Regionals which is a marching band competition and this year also we were the UIL Area F champion....AGAIN! So what do you think? Isn't this remarkable? Oh and the wind ensamble will perform in midwest clinic which is an international music convention (bands and orchestras). This is actually the second time TWHS band perform for midwest... So if you're in band and just recently moved to the woodlands, please consider these amazing achievements that this high school has made
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 3, 2012

The Woodlands High School doesn't burn the candle at both ends; it burns it in the middle as well. The academics, the sports, the partying...they're all generally happening at a college level. In fact, a small college will probably feel like a step down from TWHS. As for arts, social causes, and other "progressive" pursuits, those take a back seat here. Remember this is Houston. If a student isn't a serious jock or brain, they're going to have to hunt around to find their niche. If your kid cannot stick with an extracurricular activity or two, they will be absolutely miserable at this school. It's a huge school so it's easy to feel like a number. I'm already assuming you're white, affluent, suburban, and conservative - like most of the families living in the school zone. If you're thinking of private school, your kid will certainly get a lot more one-on-one attention from teachers than at TWHS. If you're thinking about College Park, TWHS is a just slightly more upscale and competitive. If you're thinking about Klein or Oak Ridge, those are all a step down. If you're worried about snobs or status symbols, those aren't really a problem at TWHS for half the students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 31, 2012

My son was ill equipped for college coming out of this school. Being a GT, and then an AP student, you would think he would be able to do very well in a university setting. Untrue. Writing and Reading skills were never enforced in The Woodlands School system, and the science classes were a joke. They were taught to pass the TAKS every year. We had no choice but use the schools, we couldn't afford a better school district nor the privates in town. So like everyone else, we NEEDED to believe the school was excellent. It was gang free, I'll give it that.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 21, 2012

I have two kids at TWHS, a Senior and a Freshman. The education my kids are receiving is beyond good-- it's truly exceptional. How many high schools offer Japanese or Chinese?? The selection of AP classes is also very good. The teachers and staff are dedicated to the students and care about them. The extracurricular and sports programs are first class. It is a very competitive school, academically and otherwise, but I think my kids will be well prepared for college and life beyond because of it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 18, 2011

We are generally satisfied with this school but it is way too big and overly bureaucratic. In addition, the students tend to be very wealthy which adds pressure on everyone to keep up. My child does very well and takes AP classes but is literally a number and is just thinking ahead to college.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 5, 2011

Fantastic school! I am a senior at TWHS and, having experienced education systems all over the world, I can guarantee you that it is one of the best. Everyone is friendly and all the teachers treat you like adults. The high expectations will leave you well equipped for the future.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 29, 2010

The Woodlands High School is an excellent school. There are a variety of courses good for challenges. However, students excel too much in sports.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 19, 2010

I am going into my senior year at TWHS and from my experience in the past three years, I have found it to be a relatively good school. There are a variety of courses available to take and students' GPA's reflect the difficulty of courses they take and the effort they put into those courses. Most of the teachers are enthusiastic about their subjects and teach them well, and they take a genuine interest in their students' success. There are some problems with the school, including the fact that most students excel in sports or academics, so there is little room for individuals to stand out. However, the competition is there because of the good quality of TWHS, so it's a good school overall.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 6, 2010

I am currently a student at The Woodlands High School, and I think that this school is the interior of education. Courses of study are extensive by numbers; there are varieties of classes you can take, and classes that interest you. However, indeed the faculties/staffs can really be unreliable and irresponsible. Also, if you take sports and/or band for your extracurricular activities, they are emphatically consuming your time, and as a matter of fact, they're just taking you over by 75 percent.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 23, 2010

TWHS is a great school. Both of my kids graduated there and went on to Texas A&M. I disagree with the comments against block scheduling. It actually prepares the students for what they will have to do in college. TWHS students didn't panic as freshman at college when other students did as they looked at the material they would have to cover in a short period of time. And if you skip classes in college, you miss out as well. So block scheduling has definite strong points that could possibly outweigh any negative. -- Concerning the comments about "fast cars" and "designer clothes": the school is in an affluent area and those things come with the territory. It's not a secret when parents move their kids into the school feeder zones. It's rather obvious by just driving around the area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 30, 2010

I would agree that the 4 block accelerated learning doesn't suit all teens and is probably better for the teachers. If you miss more than a day sick, it can screw up your whole year! If you don't live here all your life, then it is impossible to get into the sports, it is too big and impersonal. Very disappointed with TWHS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 29, 2010

Currently a sophomore attending TWHS. Faculty is typically helpful, though can be unreliable at times. GREAT sports programs. Academics with block schedule is very fast and not thorough. Very stressful. Too much emphasis on money and status. If you don't have money or looks or excel at one particular activity, you don't live 'the woodlands lifestyle'. Only junior and senior parking lot, no sophomore. False sense of security--wallet and iPod stolen on separate occasions. Too much money, stress, competition. Not enough in return.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 7, 2009

The Woodlands High School pushes you to be your personal best. Just floating by with average grades and sports performances isn't acceptable. We are the best in almost everything we do and behind that is hard work, dedication, and years of upholding the tradition of what it is to be a Highlander.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 5, 2009

My three oldest attended TWHS but each had a ho-hum experience. Too much emphasis on money and fast cars. The four period block schedule has many disadvantages and may be better for teachers than students. Elite attitude doesn't promote individuality or creativity. We sent our fourth child across the interstate to Oak Ridge High School. What a difference! Great learning communities, clothes labels aren't as important and kids want to go to school there. Very spirited. Teachers participate and motivate students. Just a world of difference at the Ridge.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 4, 2009

The Woodlands Highshool pushes you to be your personal best. Just floating by with average grades and sports performances isn't acceptable. We are the best in almost everything we do and behind that is hard work, dedication, and years of upholding the tradition of what it is to be a Highlander.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 89% in 2011.

1024 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
99%
Math

The state average for Math was 70% in 2011.

1033 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 91% in 2011.

977 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
97%
Math

The state average for Math was 74% in 2011.

978 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
89%
Science

The state average for Science was 76% in 2011.

977 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
92%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 93% in 2011.

968 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 95% in 2013.

975 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
99%
Math

The state average for Math was 89% in 2013.

975 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
98%
Science

The state average for Science was 95% in 2013.

976 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
98%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 98% in 2013.

979 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students99%
Female100%
Male97%
Black or African American92%
Asian100%
Hispanic99%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged97%
Special education83%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a

Math

All Students97%
Female98%
Male95%
Black or African American77%
Asian100%
Hispanic94%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White98%
Economically disadvantaged83%
Special education72%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a

Science

All Students99%
Female100%
Male99%
Black or African American92%
Asian100%
Hispanic98%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged93%
Special education87%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a

Social Studies

All Students99%
Female100%
Male99%
Black or African American92%
Asian100%
Hispanic99%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged97%
Special education90%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

  • In 2010-2011, this school was rated "Recognized".
  • In 2009-2010, this school was rated "Recognized".
  • In 2008-2009, this school was rated "Recognized".

About the tests


Texas uses Accountability Ratings to indicate the overall performance of each school and district. The ratings are based on TAKS test results, dropout rates for grades 7 and 8 and school completion rates for grades 9 through 12. Schools and districts rated under standard accountability procedures are designated as Exemplary, Recognized, Academically Acceptable or Academically Unacceptable. Schools and districts rated under alternative education accountability (AEA) procedures are designated as either AEA: Academically Acceptable or AEA: Academically Unacceptable.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 78% in 2013.

614 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
94%
Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 97% in 2013.

391 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
96%
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 85% in 2013.

960 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
98%
Chemistry

The state average for Chemistry was 84% in 2013.

949 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
94%
English I Reading

The state average for English I Reading was 65% in 2013.

984 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
88%
English I Writing

The state average for English I Writing was 48% in 2013.

1006 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
86%
English II Reading

The state average for English II Reading was 78% in 2013.

986 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
n/a
English II Writing

The state average for English II Writing was 52% in 2013.

987 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
n/a
English III Reading

The state average for English III Reading was 63% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
English III Writing

The state average for English III Writing was 42% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 86% in 2013.

840 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
100%
Physics

The state average for Physics was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
87%
U.S. History

The state average for U.S. History was 73% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
World Geography

The state average for World Geography was 75% in 2013.

970 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
98%
World History

The state average for World History was 70% in 2013.

955 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
n/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Algebra I

All Students93%
Female95%
Male91%
Black or African American84%
Asian93%
Hispanic94%
Multiracial69%
American Indian or Alaska Native100%
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Economically disadvantaged87%
Not economically disadvantaged93%
Special education69%
Not special education94%
Limited English proficient (LEP)85%
Proficient in English93%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant93%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted93%
Bilingualn/a

Algebra II

All Students100%
Female99%
Male100%
Black or African American100%
Asian100%
Hispanic98%
Multiracial100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted100%
Bilingualn/a

Biology I

All Students98%
Female99%
Male97%
Black or African American87%
Asian97%
Hispanic96%
Multiracial95%
American Indian or Alaska Native100%
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White99%
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Special education81%
Not special education98%
Limited English proficient (LEP)85%
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant98%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted97%
Bilingualn/a

Chemistry

All Students97%
Female97%
Male96%
Black or African American81%
Asian95%
Hispanic95%
Multiracial86%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Economically disadvantaged90%
Not economically disadvantaged97%
Special education65%
Not special education97%
Limited English proficient (LEP)76%
Proficient in English97%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant97%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted96%
Bilingualn/a

English I Reading

All Students90%
Female95%
Male84%
Black or African American61%
Asian89%
Hispanic85%
Multiracial80%
American Indian or Alaska Native86%
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Economically disadvantaged63%
Not economically disadvantaged91%
Special education52%
Not special education91%
Limited English proficient (LEP)57%
Proficient in English91%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant90%
Gifted/talented99%
Non-Gifted89%
Bilingualn/a

English I Writing

All Students78%
Female85%
Male71%
Black or African American62%
Asian92%
Hispanic75%
Multiracial56%
American Indian or Alaska Native83%
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Economically disadvantaged49%
Not economically disadvantaged79%
Special education17%
Not special education80%
Limited English proficient (LEP)32%
Proficient in English80%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant78%
Gifted/talented99%
Non-Gifted76%
Bilingualn/a

English II Reading

All Students95%
Female98%
Male92%
Black or African American91%
Asian91%
Hispanic92%
Multiracial87%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Economically disadvantaged89%
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Special education56%
Not special education96%
Limited English proficient (LEP)68%
Proficient in English96%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant95%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted94%
Bilingualn/a

English II Writing

All Students82%
Female89%
Male76%
Black or African American57%
Asian86%
Hispanic75%
Multiracial67%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Economically disadvantaged49%
Not economically disadvantaged84%
Special education33%
Not special education84%
Limited English proficient (LEP)32%
Proficient in English84%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant82%
Gifted/talented98%
Non-Gifted80%
Bilingualn/a

English III Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

English III Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

Geometry

All Students97%
Female98%
Male96%
Black or African American76%
Asian94%
Hispanic96%
Multiracial88%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Economically disadvantaged90%
Not economically disadvantaged97%
Special education72%
Not special education97%
Limited English proficient (LEP)83%
Proficient in English97%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant97%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted96%
Bilingualn/a

Physics

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

U.S. History

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

World Geography

All Students97%
Female98%
Male97%
Black or African American87%
Asian94%
Hispanic98%
Multiracial93%
American Indian or Alaska Native100%
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Economically disadvantaged95%
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Special education75%
Not special education98%
Limited English proficient (LEP)90%
Proficient in English98%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant97%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted97%
Bilingualn/a

World History

All Students95%
Female94%
Male95%
Black or African American91%
Asian97%
Hispanic92%
Multiracial93%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White95%
Economically disadvantaged82%
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Special education65%
Not special education95%
Limited English proficient (LEP)61%
Proficient in English95%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant95%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted94%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 70% 29%
Hispanic 20% 52%
Asian or Pacific Islander 5% 4%
Black 3% 13%
Two or more races 2% 2%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander N/A 0%
Source: TX Education Agency, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Limited English proficient (LEP) 3%N/A17%
Source: TX Education Agency, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Beginning teachers 2%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
Music
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • German
  • Spanish
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • GREGG COLSCHEN
Fax number
  • (936) 709-1299

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • German
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Library
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Golf
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Golf

Arts & music

Music
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing arts
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Join PTO/PTA
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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6101 Research Forest Drive
Spring, TX 77381
Website: Click here
Phone: (936) 709-1200

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