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GreatSchools Rating

John Tyler High School

Public | 9-12 | 2015 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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21 reviews of this school


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Posted May 30, 2014

I have been so impressed the the change at John Tyler that has been implemented by Dr. Gay, the administrative staff, and teachers. John Tyler is moving in a positive direction and you can tell the students are excited and enjoying the school. The focus has finally moved from discipline to instruction and the teachers that are not doing their best are being found out. The school is not yet perfect, but it is headed in the right direction. They are bringing back a lot of programs that have been missing like ag and cosmetology. John Tyler is becoming a place of pride again. The Orchestra won sweepstakes for the first time in the history of the school and the new UIL coordinator is a person that seems to be excited to focus the students on academic events besides the usual athletics. Some great things are happening at John Tyler and I can't wait to see where we are headed next. Go CUJO!!!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted April 8, 2013

This districts' high schools are STILL too crowded! And they've just lost ANOTHER principal at John Tyler!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 4, 2013

This school needs improvement academically. The teachers NEED to get involed with the students. Of course there are some teachers who care but thats only a small fraction of a staff. It's as if they only cared about athletics. Not happy at all
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 28, 2010

From what I read & as a former teacher with MANY years of experience from another district, it sounds like the administration & staff need a huge raise for even staying. It sounds as if the school's student body needs a reform. The merchandise is BAD!!! Try to hang in there, teachers.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted July 18, 2010

My daughter-in-law was a teacher at this school for one year. During that time she encountered daily altercations between students. There were either gang or racially motivated. The administration was helpless to do anything. One of the teachers was fatally stabbed by a student. The faculty is so concerned for their own safety and trying to maintain discipline that they have little time to do any real teaching. Even though jobs are hard to get these days, my daughter-in-law quit her job at the end of the year rather than go back again. The school district needs to wake up to the situation and get some discipline going, starting with uniforms for all students, and active presence of competent law enforcement on campus. Get the parents involved too.


Posted May 19, 2010

I am a teacher at this school. John Tyler has problems. We have been through several principals in the last few years--our current principal was not even allowed to finish serving to the end of the year, but was removed and replaced with someone from the District who knew how to manage the campus. We are currently looking at a new principal to find a good fit for next year. Not to say that the principal was our school's only problem, of course. The majority of my 10th grade students start the school year with poor reading/interpretation skills, a complete lack of study skills, and absolutely no investment in their futures or academic success. It doesn't help that some other teachers on campus are too lax, letting students use phones, listen to music, curse, and act crude in the school. What JT needs is strong leadership, consistency, and support.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted July 28, 2008

I am a student at UT Tyler and in accordance with educator preperation classes, I conducted my last 2 months of the semester at John Tyler High. To be honest, after hearing numerous bad reviews of the students, the teachers and the school itself, I was understandably nervous. By the end of my 2 months, I was almost in tears at the thought of having to leave the students and the teacher I had the pleasure of working with. In fact, I returned to the school on my own time to spend more time in the classroom. I agree that new teachers that really care about the students and their education would be a good addition to the school, but this idea is only based on my encounter with one teacher! The students are more than capable to reach their dreams....someone just needs to help guide them through the rough patches.


Posted May 14, 2008

I think John Tyler needs new teachers that actually care, and the administraters have no control over the students
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 12, 2008

This is one of the worst schools I've ever encountered. The children are out of control and the administration is completely ineffective in dealing with them. Reading and writing skills are abyssimally low.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted January 20, 2007

John Tyler is an outstanding school. I had one student graduate from John Tyler last year and was well prepared for college. Dr. McFarland has done a outstanding job of removing the barriers to a college education for his students. My daughter and many of her classmates were able to take numerous college visits during the senior year and was given quite a bit of one on one help with scholarships and college enrollment applications. If I am not mistaken over 95% of her classmates were accepted to college and her entire class recieved over $5 million dollars in scholarships. I am excited about his leadership and the changes he is making at the school. I have a 9th grade student and she loves the school and her teachers. They are already talking to her about college. I wish more people in the community recognized the outstanding things happening at JT.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 13, 2007

John Tyler is OK, but nothing like it use to be! I believe that some of the teachers should be replaced with teachers who actually care.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 4, 2006

As a former student of John Tyler High School and a graduate of Robert E Lee, out of the two schools I would prefer John Tyler any day. While I attended school there I had great teachers who were willing to help and without any hesitation. I also attended Chapel Hill High School and out the three I would put John Tyler at #1. I was enrolled in several AP classes and found them very challenging and rewarding John Tyler also is respected in the area for its athletics having won 3 state championships in football. I loved every aspect of John Tyler and still do to this very day and I rank it number one in East Texas.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted June 6, 2006

This is supposed to be a 'parent review'. However, as an involved student, I would like to speak. The International Baccalaureate program (which I am involved in) has excellent academics and the enrollment is in this program is one the rise. The extracurricular activities are engaging and inspiring. I feel that John Tyler High School and Micheal McFarland's leadership skills are two of the best kept secrets in Tyler education.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 14, 2005

The school has a variety of great programs, but the faculty is not involved nearly enough with parents and in the community. A majority of the teachers are willing to help a struggling student, but some have a 'don't care' attitude towards the success of the students. There is also an issue with the classroom environment. Students who should not be in AP classes are made to take the class anyways taking away valuable time away from serious students.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 8, 2005

As a former student of John Tyler High School, I know that this is the best school that I have attended. The faculty do not try to help but actually help with the situation. There are many extracurricular activies available for each student's choice. I personally was part of two activities and loved it. The teachers would work around our schoolwork to help us be better in their club. I know that my parents were not really involved in the school when I was a student. This was my fault. Now as I am older I know how beneficial it would have been if they knew where I spend most of my time. It was a great school and I am proud of being a graduate from JOHN TYLER HIGH SCHOOL.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted January 12, 2005

I graduated from this school, and I would like to say that I had some fantastic teachers, some better than my university professors. If the student is genuinely interested in learning, they should look into programs that nurture that curiosity, and there they will find some of the best teachers in the state. However, overall the school needs alot of work, the only way I would send my child to John Tyler is if they were in the IB programme.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted December 28, 2004

I think since Mr. Mcfarland is there this school has and will progress in to a great high. He has done so much for the seniors this year I have seem a lot of progess I have wanted to thank him for everything. But I think there needs to be more parental involement and teacher involement . And the counslers need more help from the parents or parent volunteers so the seniors that are headed for college can have more information. Especially the parents that do not know anything a bout college or hto get the information.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 30, 2004

I am a graduate of this school and my two children graduated from this school as well. I graduated in the early 70s when racial tensions were high, where I only attended one year because the high school I attended was closed. It was the year for the biggest band, choir, drill team etc. My children graduated in the late 90s and things seemed to have changed after that point. Teachers simply have a job and no genuine concern for students. There have always been obvious differences made between JT and the school across town. There very definitely needs to be some changes made quick, fast and in a hurry. I am ashamed to say that I and my children attended John Tyler High School with the negatives that accompany it now.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 13, 2004

This school is on the move with the installment of its new principle Michael McFarland. This leader is in the process of taking John Tyler to the next level of education. He has put together the first Key Communication Group at this school that I know of. This group is poised to brain storm on key areas of concern that with the proper ideas and focus can make an impact on this years academics and social development. This type of leadership on the part of the principle and his staff should bring results.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted July 9, 2004

This is not a good school. There are too many gang related activities, the teachers are not involved in students lives and they are more involved in racial problems than teaching their students what they haven't learned yet.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 89% in 2011.

514 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
82%
Math

The state average for Math was 70% in 2011.

508 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
40%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 91% in 2011.

375 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
72%
Math

The state average for Math was 74% in 2011.

377 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
54%
Science

The state average for Science was 76% in 2011.

374 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
44%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 93% in 2011.

372 students were tested at this school in 2011.

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 95% in 2013.

343 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
85%
Math

The state average for Math was 89% in 2013.

341 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
81%
Science

The state average for Science was 95% in 2013.

343 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
78%
Social Studies

The state average for Social Studies was 98% in 2013.

343 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

English Language Arts

All Students90%
Female93%
Male87%
Black or African American91%
Asiann/a
Hispanic89%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White93%
Economically disadvantaged90%
Special education52%
Limited English proficient (LEP)68%

Math

All Students84%
Female86%
Male82%
Black or African American79%
Asiann/a
Hispanic87%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged85%
Special education47%
Limited English proficient (LEP)73%

Science

All Students92%
Female92%
Male93%
Black or African American88%
Asiann/a
Hispanic95%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged93%
Special education61%
Limited English proficient (LEP)88%

Social Studies

All Students97%
Female97%
Male96%
Black or African American95%
Asiann/a
Hispanic98%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
White100%
Economically disadvantaged97%
Special education79%
Limited English proficient (LEP)94%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) was used to test students in English language arts and mathematics in grade 11. The grade 11 exit Level TAKS is a high school graduation requirement. TAKS is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

  • In 2010-2011, this school was rated "Academically Unacceptable".
  • In 2009-2010, this school was rated "Academically Acceptable".
  • In 2008-2009, this school was rated "Academically Acceptable".

About the tests


Texas uses Accountability Ratings to indicate the overall performance of each school and district. The ratings are based on TAKS test results, dropout rates for grades 7 and 8 and school completion rates for grades 9 through 12. Schools and districts rated under standard accountability procedures are designated as Exemplary, Recognized, Academically Acceptable or Academically Unacceptable. Schools and districts rated under alternative education accountability (AEA) procedures are designated as either AEA: Academically Acceptable or AEA: Academically Unacceptable.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 78% in 2013.

469 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
73%
Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 97% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
n/a
Biology I

The state average for Biology I was 85% in 2013.

528 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
83%
Chemistry

The state average for Chemistry was 84% in 2013.

423 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
n/a
English I Reading

The state average for English I Reading was 65% in 2013.

598 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
52%
English I Writing

The state average for English I Writing was 48% in 2013.

666 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
25%

2012

 
 
31%
English II Reading

The state average for English II Reading was 78% in 2013.

404 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
n/a
English II Writing

The state average for English II Writing was 52% in 2013.

405 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
n/a
English III Reading

The state average for English III Reading was 63% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
English III Writing

The state average for English III Writing was 42% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 86% in 2013.

409 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
100%
Physics

The state average for Physics was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
U.S. History

The state average for U.S. History was 73% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
World Geography

The state average for World Geography was 75% in 2013.

571 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
70%
World History

The state average for World History was 70% in 2013.

439 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
n/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Algebra I

All Students71%
Female77%
Male67%
Black or African American70%
Asiann/a
Hispanic73%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White67%
Economically disadvantaged70%
Not economically disadvantaged79%
Special education42%
Not special education72%
Limited English proficient (LEP)56%
Proficient in English74%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant71%
Gifted/talented79%
Non-Gifted71%
Bilingualn/a

Algebra II

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black or African American100%
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged100%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Special educationn/a
Not special education100%
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant100%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted100%
Bilingualn/a

Biology I

All Students78%
Female78%
Male78%
Black or African American76%
Asiann/a
Hispanic79%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Economically disadvantaged78%
Not economically disadvantaged83%
Special education69%
Not special education78%
Limited English proficient (LEP)48%
Proficient in English82%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant78%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted77%
Bilingualn/a

Chemistry

All Students72%
Female78%
Male66%
Black or African American80%
Asiann/a
Hispanic66%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Not economically disadvantaged79%
Special education20%
Not special education73%
Limited English proficient (LEP)44%
Proficient in English76%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant72%
Gifted/talented90%
Non-Gifted71%
Bilingualn/a

English I Reading

All Students45%
Female48%
Male43%
Black or African American45%
Asiann/a
Hispanic45%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White60%
Economically disadvantaged43%
Not economically disadvantaged62%
Special education11%
Not special education46%
Limited English proficient (LEP)10%
Proficient in English51%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant45%
Gifted/talented87%
Non-Gifted43%
Bilingualn/a

English I Writing

All Students25%
Female30%
Male21%
Black or African American26%
Asiann/a
Hispanic24%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White24%
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantaged43%
Special education6%
Not special education25%
Limited English proficient (LEP)6%
Proficient in English28%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant25%
Gifted/talented61%
Non-Gifted23%
Bilingualn/a

English II Reading

All Students73%
Female78%
Male67%
Black or African American82%
Asiann/a
Hispanic66%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Economically disadvantaged72%
Not economically disadvantaged80%
Special educationn/a
Not special education74%
Limited English proficient (LEP)24%
Proficient in English78%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant73%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted71%
Bilingualn/a

English II Writing

All Students35%
Female41%
Male28%
Black or African American38%
Asiann/a
Hispanic32%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White45%
Economically disadvantaged34%
Not economically disadvantaged44%
Special educationn/a
Not special education35%
Limited English proficient (LEP)7%
Proficient in English38%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant35%
Gifted/talented59%
Non-Gifted33%
Bilingualn/a

English III Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

English III Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

Geometry

All Students86%
Female88%
Male84%
Black or African American85%
Asiann/a
Hispanic87%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Economically disadvantaged86%
Not economically disadvantaged90%
Special education43%
Not special education87%
Limited English proficient (LEP)76%
Proficient in English87%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant86%
Gifted/talented100%
Non-Gifted85%
Bilingualn/a

Physics

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

U.S. History

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black or African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Special educationn/a
Not special educationn/a
Limited English proficient (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Migrantn/a
Non-migrantn/a
Gifted/talentedn/a
Non-Giftedn/a

World Geography

All Students55%
Female52%
Male58%
Black or African American53%
Asiann/a
Hispanic55%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Special education12%
Not special education56%
Limited English proficient (LEP)19%
Proficient in English60%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant55%
Gifted/talented94%
Non-Gifted53%
Bilingualn/a

World History

All Students52%
Female50%
Male54%
Black or African American58%
Asiann/a
Hispanic47%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Economically disadvantaged49%
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Special education25%
Not special education52%
Limited English proficient (LEP)29%
Proficient in English55%
Migrantn/a
Non-migrant52%
Gifted/talented82%
Non-Gifted49%
Bilingualn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) was used to test students in reading and math in grades 3 through 8; in writing in grades 4 and 7; in science in grades 5 and 8; in social studies in grade 8; and end-of-course assessments for English I, II, and II, Algebra I and II, biology and US History. STAAR is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Texas. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Texas Education Agency; if there are a small number of students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Texas Education Agency

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 55% 52%
Black 40% 13%
White 4% 29%
American Indian/Alaska Native N/A 0%
Asian or Pacific Islander N/A 4%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander N/A 0%
Two or more races 0% 2%
Source: TX Education Agency, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Limited English proficient (LEP) 12%N/A17%
Source: TX Education Agency, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
Beginning teachers 3%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
College counselor(s)
Computer specialist(s)
Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
Dance teacher(s)
ELL/ESL Coordinator
Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Math specialist(s)
Nurse(s)
PE instructor(s)
Reading specialist(s)
Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
School psychologist
School social worker/counselors(s)
Security personnel
Special education coordinator
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Tutor(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

Special education / special needs

Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Staff resources available to students
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • Math specialist(s)
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
School facilities
  • Computer lab
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Industrial shop
  • Science lab
Visual arts
  • Architecture

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Dance teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
Visual arts
  • Architecture
  • Ceramics
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Instrumental music lessons
  • Jazz band
  • Orchestra
  • Vocal lessons / coaching
Performing and written arts
  • Dance
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • German
  • Spanish
Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
  • Dance teacher(s)
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Gym
  • Kitchen
School leaders can update this information here.

School basics

School Leader's name
  • KENNETH GAY
Fax number
  • (903) 531-9916

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • German
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • College counselor(s)
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
  • Dance teacher(s)
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Math specialist(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Reading specialist(s)
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
  • School psychologist
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Security personnel
  • Special education coordinator
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
  • Tutor(s)
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
  • School shares bus/van with other schools
  • Transportation provided for special education students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Art room
  • Audiovisual aids
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • College/career center
  • Computer lab
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Gym
  • Industrial shop
  • Internet access
  • Kitchen
  • Library
  • Music room
  • Parent center
  • Performance stage
  • Science lab
School leaders can update this information here.

Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Power lifting / Weight lifting
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross country
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Architecture
  • Ceramics
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Instrumental music lessons
  • Jazz band
  • Orchestra
  • Vocal lessons / coaching
Performing arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
Media arts
  • None
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Coach sports teams or extracurricular activities
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Serve on school improvement team or governance council
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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1120 N Nw Loop 323
Tyler, TX 75702
Phone: (903) 262-2860

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